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Assignment In Eternity Mass Market Paperback – 6 Aug 2013


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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Baen Books; Reprint edition (6 Aug 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1451639074
  • ISBN-13: 978-1451639070
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2.5 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,301,154 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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About the Author

Robert A Heinlein is considered one of the Big Three of classic science fiction (along with Isaac Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke). Heinlein is a seven-time Hugo Award recipient and was given the first Grand Master Nebula Award for lifetime achievement. Heinlein's juveniles alone have influenced generations of scientists, engineers and creators the world over (for instance, it was once estimated that everyone in the Apollo 11 mission control room had read and loved at least one Heinlein novel). His worldwide bestsellers include "Have Space Suit--Will Travel, Stranger in a Strange Land, Starship Troopers, Time Enough for Love," and "The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress."

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THE FIRST-QUARTER ROCKET from Moonbase put him down at Pied-a-Terre. Read the first page
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Joss Delage on 13 Nov 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Heinlein is one of my all time favorite, with F. Herbert, J. Vance, P.J. Farmer, and a few others. I trully love 'Stranger in a Strange Land', 'Friday', 'Time Enough for Love', and 'Starship Troopers'. This book doesn't get even close to those.
As far as I'm concerned, the merit of a book can be most safely assessed by asking oneself the question "Had this book been written by a total stranger rather than the Grand Master himself, would it (1) still be in print, and (2) sell as much?" In this case, I think that the answer would be a clear no. The stories are very dated, both in their vision of science and in cultural references (blacks are "negroes", women are treated in a superbly paternalistic way...) The story-telling itself is not up to Heinlein's standard: most of them are half finished at best. Finally, the stories totally lack the humor and wittiness that makes Heinlein such a great author.
I'll grant that this book looks into some serious themes, and fosters reflexion. However, some of the themes are just silly.
'Friday', 'Stranger...', and 'Starship...' are as much if not more thought provoking, and the storytelling is light years better than 'Assignment...'
Overall, I would recommend this book to Heinlein's fans - not to people who do not know his work or enjoy it more casually.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Shepherd on 14 Feb 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a collection of various stories that did not fit into Heinlein's Future History series (at least not at the time they were first published). Like most collections, the quality varies considerably from one story to the next.
"Gulf" first appeared in the Nov-Dec 1949 issues of Astounding magazine, and is the best fleshed out story here. A novella, the first portion of this reads like a James Bond thriller (perhaps better), the action is fast paced and our hero's actions make sense. But it quickly becomes apparent that he is far more than an average man, in fact he is something of a superman in terms of intelligence, reaction time, and decision making, items which are not lost on an entire society of such individuals, who recruit and train him. Some of the science presented here about how such a group of people came to be and the methods used for training them will seem a little dubious to today's readers, and the moral points raised (is a superior being justified in eliminating, without recourse to the law, those he feel are a threat to his society?) might raise a few hackles, but this is still a fun, fast read that will make you do a little thinking. Kettle Bailey is introduced in this story, and it might be considered a prequel to his much later novel Friday, which dealt with some of the same moral issues. Like almost everything else he wrote, this story was tied into his Future History in his last books.
"Elsewhen" is very minor Heinlein, with almost no characterization and very little plot. It originally appeared in Sept 1941 issue of Astounding (as by 'Caleb Saunders'), and clearly showed that Heinlein was still learning the craft of writing at that time.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By bernie VINE VOICE on 14 Sep 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
There are two major Heinlein camps and a few crossovers. This may account for the wide variation in what people think of this book. Artists in any field paint what is real, and then what is real to them. Realists like the early works that they can relate to on their daily lives and see the later works as off the deep end. Others see the early works as silly or something that they could do better and the later works as profound and insightful. They see two people instead of one in the process of transition.
The reason I bought this book is for a story that deals with transition. "Lost Legacy" (1941) I do not want to go into too much detail as it is fun to have the story unfold in its time. However the story speculates as to what the so-called unused portion of our brain is for. Heinlein is not the first to speculate, but he does put together a great story combining many previous speculations.
While enjoying his story, look at the rudiments that will be used in later Heinlein writing, [Stranger in a Strange Land]. Even some of the names are the same
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By bernie VINE VOICE on 31 Oct 2005
Format: Unknown Binding
There are two major Heinlein camps and a few crossovers. This may account for the wide variation in what people think of this book. Artists in any field paint what is real, and then what is real to them. Realists like the early works that they can relate to on their daily lives and see the later works as off the deep end. Others see the early works as silly or something that they could do better and the later works as profound and insightful. They see two people instead of one in the process of transition.
The reason I bought this book is for a story that deals with transition. "Lost Legacy" (1941) I do not want to go into too much detail as it is fun to have the story unfold in its time. However the story speculates as to what the so-called unused portion of our brain is for. Heinlein is not the first to speculate, but he does put together a great story combining many previous speculations.
While enjoying his story, look at the rudiments that will be used in later Heinlein writing, “Stranger in a Strange Land.” Even some of the names are the same.
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