Shop now Shop now Shop now Up to 70% off Fashion Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Amazon Fire TV Subscribe and Save Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now

More Options
Assemblage
 
Zoom
See larger image (with zoom)
 

Assemblage

9 Sept. 2006 | Format: MP3

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:13
30
2
4:45
30
3
2:45
30
4
6:48
30
5
5:00
30
6
3:31
30
7
3:39
30
8
4:14
30
9
4:51
30
10
3:45
30
11
5:02
30
12
5:17
30
13
4:03
30
14
6:15
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.co.uk (UK).
  

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 9 Sept. 2006
  • Release Date: 9 Sept. 2006
  • Label: SONY BMG Catalog
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:04:08
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B006K0BRJM
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 23,827 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Having got the original Japanese dble (and also the UK double-play cassette) you can guess buying this reissue on top of those indicates I rate this compilation highly, even if the 'record of two halves' is slightly lost on continuous play. "Suburban Berlin" is an interesting transition track though, relying a lot more on synths and oddly paving the way for the increased BPM 'disco' era. Even "Adolescent Sex" and "Rhodesia" sound quite good, though a far far cry from their Virgin era material.

However there are some gripes with this release, and also two different track 14's, depending upon whether you buy the digi-pack remaster or this later standard jewel case release (still remastered). Firstly, from the liner notes, and the CDr promo that popped up, this should've been a 15 track release, featuring 3 (yes 3) remixes of "Life In Tokyo" in the bonus audio tracks. However for some reason Virgin decided to scrap the rarer 6.15 mix (previously only available on the cassette or Old Gold 12"/compilation CD for us in the UK) and keep Part 1 plus the cool 1982 Extended Remix (comes in at 7.05 and is similar to 1979 12" but with bass-line revamped, sequencers lowered and solo female BVs during the break) on the digi-pack release. So what about the later 'standard' jewel case release? Hmmm, track 14 is now the 6.15 mix, albeit with about 5 seconds of the outro completely cut off (very sloppy). As this is the rarer mix this may be a bonus for some, but the track change is inexplicable in terms of a simple repackage.

Then we come onto some remastering (or maybe CD manufacturing) problems that effect the first half of Track 1, and Track 13 even worse after the break.
Read more ›
Comment 9 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
A classic LP, even if its a compilation, it doesn't matter. So for that fact its top marks.

But this CD, like <especially> Quiet Life, too many of the extra tracks are repeated in their vaguest form, yet 2 of the best tracks are not included. I'm talking the Steve Nye 12" remix of European Son and the Life In Tokyo (Theme), which where both radically different than say 3 versions of "All Tomorrows Parties" (on the Quiet Life CD).

With these 2 omissions across the whole range of the remaster, you are really missing out on what are 2 great tracks, especially the European Son Steve Nye version, as I count that as their best track ever.

A shame then that unless you track down the vinyl, you'll now never get to hear them again, as I can't see Hansa (or Virgin) doing any more repacking of Japan.
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
"Assemblage" is an interesting album by the chameleon like early 1980's pop group .Listening to the album is like listening to two different bands. The first five songs have a jagged,punky edge;the likes of "Adolescent Sex" and "Communist China", however these tracks are then followed by the quite different sounding ,polished "New Romantic" synth- pop of "European Son" and "Quiet Life" ,for example. David Sylvian's vocals seem to miraculously transform from an unattractive,non-descript snarl into the smooth,honeyed tones most listeners would associate with him. Clearly the advent of the synthesiser around the late 1970's made a deep impact with the band as the jettisoned their tinny guitars in favour of a more contemporary sound.Japan gained commercial success with a string of Top 30 singles in the early 1980's,the most noted being the excellent cover version of "I Second That Emotion" which is included on this compilation."All Tomorrow's Parties" is another exceptional cover version included on this album. The first five tracks aren't the strongest,but they do grow on you after a few listens,however the better known commercial stuff is the highlight and these songs still sound great today. The main downside of this album is the inclusion of extended versions of "Life in Tokyo", "I Second That Emotion" and "European Son", all of which basically sound the same as the originals. Why not include a couple of different tracks instead ?
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Japan never quite seemed to fit into a particular market. Too stylish and sophisticated for punk, too raucous in their early days for synth pop, they fall somewhere into the "new wave plus" category that's reserved for the likes of Ultravox and Talking Heads.

It's well worth investing in this album just to hear how different the band sounded on their first three ( and particularly their first two ) albums compared to their later and higher-regarded works, "Gentlemen..." and "Tin Drum". Sylvian's voice is an unrecognisable squawk, a cross between Bowie, John Foxx and David Johanssen of the N.Y. Dolls, and sleazy guitars bounce out of the speakers. Standouts are the intense opener, "Adolescent Sex", the reggae-styled "...Rhodesia", the Bowie-esque "Suburban Berlin", the restained hit, "Quiet Life" ( for many the greatest moment for the band ) and the otherwise difficult to find disco pleasure of "European Son" ( here in 2 different versions ).
Comment 8 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
The original digipack includes the Life in Tokyo original 12" Disco Version, but labeled it as the 1982 Remix. This is a fortunate mistake, for the original 12" is far superior to the 1982 remix, which kept the disco feel, but introduced an annoying Mick Karn fretless bassline. The original is produced by Giorgio Morodor. The non-digipacks replaced the 12" version with the aforementioned annoying 1982 remix (ughh). The rest of the album is an excellent version of Assemblage with all of the key 12" remixes added to the original album. A fine reissue!
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category