As Luck Would Have It and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £20.00
  • You Save: £2.22 (11%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
As Luck Would Have It has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Greener_Books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: **SHIPPED FROM UK** We believe you will be completely satisfied with our quick and reliable service. All orders are dispatched as swiftly as possible! Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

As Luck Would Have It Hardcover – 12 Sep 2013


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£17.78
£3.39 £0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£17.78 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

As Luck Would Have It + Olivier + Stage Blood: Five tempestuous years in the early life of the National Theatre
Price For All Three: £49.59

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (12 Sept. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007458878
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007458875
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 15.9 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 203,105 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

‘An absolute delight of feel-good reading’ Sunday Express

About the Author

Born in Leytonstone, London in 1938, Derek Jacobi always wanted to be an actor. At the age of six, Derek made his acting debut, playing both lead roles in a local library production of The Prince and the Swineherd. He won a scholarship to Cambridge, where he studied and acted alongside other future greats including Ian McKellen. His talent was quickly recognised and in 1963 he was invited to become one of the founder members of Laurence Olivier’s National Theatre. Olivier’s protégé, Derek later, in turn, became mentor to Kenneth Branagh.

Derek Jacobi has worked nonstop throughout his career, starring in roles including the lead in I, Claudius, the monk detective Cadfael, Hitler in Inside The Third Reich and Francis Bacon in the controversial Love Is The Devil. But it is his numerous Shakespearean roles that have gained him worldwide recognition. He is the only actor, apart from Sir Laurence Olivier, to have the honour of holding two knighthoods, Danish and English.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By almaviva90 on 7 Oct. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Sir Derek Jacobi is one of Britain's greatest actors and therefore it was with immense pleasure that I heard a few months ago that he was publishing his autobiography in view of the rich and impressive career he has had so far (and hopefully this will continue for many years to come!). And Sir Derek the man emerges from this book very much like his acting portrayals: honest, truthful and moreover, wonderfully human.

The course of his life, from his childhood to the present, is pretty comprehensive and we get a nice balance of his experiences from both his personal and professional life, along with numerous interesting and amusing anecdotes. For those following the history of British theatre, this is a treasure trove of information regarding his time with the Marlowe Society at Cambridge, the Birmingham Rep, the National Theatre, the Old Vic/Prospect Theatre Company and of course, his highly successful tenure at the Royal Shakespeare Company in the early 1980s and after. Sadly, all this isn't indexed and one has to navigate via the chapter titles which of course is more than possible but not so convenient.

As mentioned by other reviewers though, a lack of proofreading and factual errors sometimes mar one's enjoyment of this otherwise very lovely book. As this is a collaborative effort between Sir Derek and Garry O'Connor (or to be more precise, the inside cover states that this is an 'as told to' book...it would have perhaps been better to explicitly state this on the front cover, or even in HarperCollins' press release/book description), it is rather difficult to know who (along with the proofreaders) is responsible for this.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Scott-mandeville VINE VOICE on 10 Sept. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Derek Jacobi has always been a favourite of mine and I loved his Hamlet (at the Old Vic) and fell off my seat laughing at his rendition of Benedict and his witty exchanges with Sinead Cusack as Beatrice in "Much Ado About Nothing". I adored his Claudius with the whole nation and lately enjoyed his portrayal of Alan in "Last Tango in Halifax". His gentle persona shines through this new autobiography as it has done through all his stage and TV performances.

Charming and unpretentious, in this book Jacobi has given his readers a tantalising glimpse of his life, focussing mainly on his career as an actor. He name-drops with aplomb, from "Sir" (Sir Laurence Olivier) to Ian McKellen and the book tends to read like a Who's Who of British theatre since the 1950s, but as Derek has spent his life in this world, the theatrical personalities are vital and essential threads of Jacobi's rich tapestry. There is an endearing candour in his writing - he doesn't pretend to be a great writer, telling his story in short, straightforward chapters without labouring points or boring his readers with tedious detail. An only child in a close-knit family, Jacobi makes no bones about his gay propensities, and delights in sly touches of humour and sometimes bold language and reference, but without a touch of malice. Jacobi's benign character shines through the pages as an Ariel "doing his spiriting gently".

Anyone interested in British theatre over the last half-century will enjoy this autobiography, and the refreshing lightness of touch which is Derek Jacobi's signature. A lovely book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Reviewer from Ireland on 16 Jun. 2014
Format: Hardcover
Jacobi is one of the finest classical actors in the world - even if his very famous portrayal of Hamlet in the 1979 BBC production now seems pretty hammy - and considering this and his vast experience and body of work, you would guess that this would be an exceptionally enjoyable and detailed memoir. But while the book is certainly readable and quite absorbing, Jacobi is no writer, and even with experienced biographer Garry O'Connor (incidentally, a former drama school colleague of Jacobi) to assist, this is a superficial and sometimes remarkably clumsy book. Some of the earlier chapters are merely two or three pages long, while later on Jacobi fails to go into much depth at all regarding how he plays characters. Several anecdotes are far from memorable, proving badly told and anticlimactic. (Perhaps the longest and most passionate of these is one about his dog recently going missing for a time on a walk). He even misspells the names of two of his most famous collaborators - Fred Zinnemann who directed him in 'Day of the Jackal' is spelled Zimmermann, and Jon Voight from 'The Odessa File' is now Voigt, although of course these may be the fault of the editor. We get only a brief mention of his superb Emmy-winning guest spot on Frasier, and even his work with Kenneth Branagh, who was inspired to become an actor after seeing Jacobi play Hamlet and who directed Jacobi in one of the finest ever Shakespearean performances put on film - as Claudius in his 1996 epic - is given surprisingly short shrift. But despite these major problems, this a very likeable and warm autobiography, at its best in the often very funny recollections of his time working with Olivier, Maggie Smith, and Edith Evans etc., while he is exceptionally generous and kind more often than not in his assessment of fellow actors.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback