Buy Used
£1.48
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

As If Paperback – 12 Jan 1998

3.8 out of 5 stars 37 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 12 Jan 1998
£3.43 £0.01
Available from these sellers.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Granta Books; New edition edition (12 Jan. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1862070458
  • ISBN-13: 978-1862070455
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 623,485 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Blake Morrison was born in Skipton, Yorkshire. He is the author of two collections of poetry, Dark Glasses and The Ballad of the Yorkshire Ripper; of a children's book, The Yellow House; of critical studies of the movement and Seamus Heaney; and is co-editor of The Penguin Book of Contemporary British Poetry. His bestselling memoir And when did you last see your father? won the Waterstone's/Esquire/Volvo Award for Non-Fiction, and the J.R. Ackerley Prize for Autobiography in 1993. He lives in London. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
First Sentence
"As if this were the start of a dangerous adventure, the small boy puts his hand in the bigger boy's, and they follow a third boy through the square . . ." Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This was a book I wanted to read for some time. Coincidentally, as I finished it (Jan 2001), news broke that the two convicted boys will be granted anonymity on their release. Shortly afterwards, a telephone poll in the media reported 94% of the public disagreed with this judgement. Those 94% would rather the boys' location be public knowledge, inviting retribution. Those 94% should read this book. Blake Morrison doesn't have all the answers to the questions thrown up by this tragedy, nor does he claim to. All he does is implores them to be asked, implores us to ask them of ourselves. For example, do we not all have a memory, however vague, of some incident in our childhood which we are now at a loss to explain? It doesn't have to be murder, nor even violent. The point being there exists in all our formative years some act which we now, as adults, find morally questionable and so prefer to forget. The author recalls such events, and made me do the same. Sadly, it seems the majority of the public are too happy merely to demonize these boys, the more comfortable option. Now, I'm a father of a little boy, also called James. I found reading the detailed description of the route to murder (abduction finally culminating in the act itself), hard going; difficult to avoid thinking about my own son. However, this book is not about morbid fascination. It raises topics about upbringing, parenthood, nature/nurture, all in the quest to answer THE ONE QUESTION: WHY?
Comment 35 of 38 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By C. Bannister TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 11 Dec. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I discovered this book on reading a quote in The Child Who which is a novel with a similar, although not the same, basis as the murder of James Bulger.

Blake Morrison takes us through his days and thoughts while he sat in court where Robert Thompson and Jon Veneables were tried for murder, committed at the age of 10. The trial is intersperced with his thoughts of his own childhood as well as that of his children. His empathy includes everyone, the three sets of parents involved, the three children involved as well as the social workers, the teachers and the city of Liverpool. Don't be fooled though this isn't a simplistic no-one is to blame, the book reads well as he argues to and for several of these points e.g the parents are to blame; what about their parents?. Blake Morrison puts across the view that these children shouldn't have been tried in an adult court, rather they should have had access to pyschiatric help as soon as their involvement was discovered.

Although the premise of the book was to find out why? No obvious answers are found, was it pre-meditated or a prank gone wrong? How will we ever know when 10 year old boys don't think like adults? A sad book particularly in light of the revelation that Jon Veneables has had his parole licence revoked.
Comment 8 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book is absolutely stunning. It's a gripping and truthful account of the murder of James Bulger. It is remarkably written leaving the reader deeply shocked and overcharged with emotion. This is the type of book that has you in tears but you still can not put it down. You feel compelled to read on. It is a must read for everybody if only to warn people how easily tragic events like this can occur. But be warned it is an unforgetable book which will haunt you after reading it. Blake Morrison writes the events beautifully and honestly. He tries wonderfully to answer the question 'Why' but his comments will go towards the great debate which will go on for a long time and may never be solved. As a reader who was only a couple of years older than the boys who killed James at the time I did not understand all the goings on surrounding the killing and court case so it was a must read for me when the book came out. As a case which is still very much in the headlines to this day, the book makes you realise that James's killers will be freed in a couple of years and will only be young men with all of their lives to live and James never saw past the toddler years. This book should be read by anyone who cares for children.
Comment 14 of 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
"As If" is the author's attempt to understand the "why" of the murder of James Bulger. In an attempt to do this, comparisons are made with his own home life, history and feelings, and while there is no question that his writing is exquisite, too much of the book is given over to describing the author's circumstances. I agree with the reviewer who thought this rather self-indulgent, and I felt a little frustrated since I bought the book to read about the Bulger murder, and not Blake Morrison. I also would have liked more transcripts, drawings, etc.
And yet this seems a small price to pay, since it would then not be the extraordinary book it actually is. One particular account of the author visiting the murder scene left me overwhelmed by some of the most moving and powerful writing I think I have ever read! Morrison's honest treatment of the Bulger murderers is truly commendable, and anyone with so much as a passing interest in the case should read it, so long as they are prepared to forego sensationalism for something altogether more intelligent.
Comment 26 of 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not a comfortable read, but does make you question your own values and assumptions about the public version of events surrounding this crime. Also puts children to the forefront as sentient beings, and asks us to weigh up the balance of culpability and vulnerability of all concerned in the terrible murder of James Bulger and the resultant media reports of the trial and convictions.
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback