Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now

Customer Reviews

62
4.2 out of 5 stars
Armageddon's Children: Book One of the Genesis of Shannara
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£7.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Many years ago I read some of the Shannara stories but I have to confess, I found them okay but not very memorable. I can remember books by Fiest, Eddings etc, but nothing stuck from Terry Brooks.

It wasn't until I picked this up and read the reviews that I realised that it linked into the Shannara stories and some of Brooks' other works, but you can read this in isolation.

This is a blend of post apocalypse survival with more then a bit of dark fantasy slung in. While the remains of mankind try to survive a holocaust, they have to defend themselves against emerging demons and those of mankind who are turning towards the emerging darkness.

I enjoyed this far more then I thought I would, with an interesting slant on the usual post apocalypse stuff. I was engaged quickly and keen to keep turning the pages to find where it was going. It does end on a bit of a cliffhanger which was a little frustrating and this probably pushed me to a three star score rather then four and it will be a frustrating wait until the next one.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on 18 March 2007
I have not been reading Terry Brooks in years, and I have to say "finding" him again with this book was a most pleasant surprise.

If you have read the Shannara books, please be wary and do not approach this book with the same ideas: this is no fantasy, or at least, not fantasy in the classic sense: the story unfolds in a post-apocalyptic scenario like has been told hundreds of times, but Mr. Brooks manages to add a new soul to it, avoiding all clichés you could expect.

The book unfolds "slowly", but this slowness does not affect the eagerness to go on, to turn page after page: as I see it, it is simply the price we have to pay to get to know well the main characters that will star in the next books, and once again I have not been disappointed by the level of insight that we are provided on each of them.

What truly crowns this book as a must-have for any Shannara fan, however, is the hints you get in the beginning (and the confirmations you get later on) that this story might have to do more with the world we learnt to know in the Shannara series than you might expected by a first glance.

The only warning I feel to give concerns the ending: this is a major cliffhanger, so if you think this may be a bother and maybe spoil a truly good story, then you might want to wait for the whole trilogy to be published before buying this book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 9 October 2007
I have read a lot of Terry Brooks' works but have never got around to the Word and the Void series so some of the mythology eluded me while I got into the book.

However I found this to be a good start to the trilogy and have always been intrigued by the background to Brooks' Shannara world. It is obvious he has pondered in depth the nature of the human animal and how it would respond to a catastrophe and come out the other end. Added to the mix are the usual magic plus a persecution by the forces of darkness and the inevitable re-emergence of the elves.

The only real criticism I would have of the book is it seemed to skim over various sections to make the book punchy and lacked depth in places. Some of the characters are one dimensional and there is virtually nothing of the humans in the domes who are portrayed as universally close minded and ineffectual and humans are not that black and white. It comes across a bit like a film director having to cram his vision of a three hour epic into ninety minutes.

Still reservations aside a good read and worth sticking with.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 4 May 2009
Welcome to the post apocalyptic USA as defined by Terry Brooks.
"Armageddon's Children", is the first volume in a continuing story. There were at the last count two further audio works which continue the themes set out in this volume. These continuations are in order: "The Elves of Cintra" & "The Gypsy Morph"
This is a workmanlike attempt to combine Science Faction and Fantasy. (For those who do not know Science Faction unlike Science Fiction takes as its premise known technology in this case nuclear war, germ and chemical warfare.)
Terry Brooks introduces us to the main characters, gives us potted biographies wrapped in the memories of these characters and sets out what will be continuing story threads throughout all three volumes.
If you are familiar with the author's earlier fantasy works, you will not be disappointed. If you are a new reader your acceptance will depend on your fondness for the fantasy genre and all that this entails.
This audio work and the other volumes mentioned earlier each take over fifteen hours to run through. To get the full impact of the epic tale it would be advisable to invest in the other volumes.
There have been other works dealing with end of civilization scenarios; John Wyndham's "Day Of The Triffids"(The Book Not the film), George R Stewarts's "Earth Abides" and more recently Stephen King's "The Stand". All of these have there own view about what happens after the big event. I think "Armageddon's Children" is a worthy addition to this genre.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
34 of 37 people found the following review helpful
Those of you who read Terry Brooks will know what to expect from this book. It will be written tightly with precise brush strokes of storytelling from a masterful writer. What I am going to tell you is simple: More than any other Terry Brooks book, I cannot wait for Book Two of this trilogy to be released! The first book centers around the destruction of the world and those who have been called upon to save a sliver of it. The two Knights in this book are written extraordinarily real - I honestly felt their plight and what it means for them to serve the Word. The story is dark and eager to be told, the characters real, and the only bad thing about this book is the wait for Book Two! Note: New readers to Terry Brooks can read this book without having read a single thing from the man! So buy it, enjoy it as I did!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 29 September 2008
Terry Brooks has wriiten some excellent books - Shannara, The Word & Void being the pinnacle. This new series is very disappointing - it's as though the author was given a premise to write a trilogy around and he came up with this vapid and uninspiring script. Given this was supposedly linked to the Word & Void (which is superb) it is just plain dull. I was really looking forward to reading this trilogy, but after reading the first half, I'd completely lost interest in completing it
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 29 August 2007
When i first saw this book i was not sure what to make of it, as I had always bin unsure of Brooks' setting for his "word and the void" books. Mixing fantasy with modern day seemed a strange combination, but in the end, the fact the book also contained elements of the shannara series (which i loved) meant i had to read it. I made sure first however, that i overcame my trepidation about his word and the void series first by reading all three of those books.

This book is definitely worth reading, its very engaging and i found it really hard to put down for too long. If your a fan of the word and the void and/or the shannara series then it is really a must read. I would recommend that you read Brooks' original word & the void trilogy first before reading this since, whilst its not essential, it certainly helps to understand whats going on and just who the Knights of the Word are and so forth.

All in all the concept behind this series is very interesting and whilst this book was fantastic, I cant wait to see where the other two go.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 18 July 2009
Having not read any of Terry Brooks previous novels I had no expectations of how this book would compare to any other Shannara series, but I was a little worried I might be lost in a world where characters had a history or future that I was unaware of and this would diminish the tale. However after reading the book I never felt I was missing out on anything, Brooks fans probably know better though. Armageddon's Children is set in a post apocalyptic world where the remnants of humanity fight for survival against Demons and their vast armies. Throw in a few elves, some magic and knights on quests and you have a novel that tries to meld two distinct genres and it does work for the most part. This is an enjoyable read but it is no masterpiece and while I have purchased the next two books in the series, I doubt I will find myself re-reading Armageddon's Children.
Oh and this book is very much one part of a trilogy. It does not stand alone in any respect, you are essentially purchasing one third of a book. If I had of bought this book when it first came out and had the prospect of having to wait for the other two to be written, I probably would have felt a bit cheated.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 24 June 2007
Once again another excellent book by Terry Brooks, a post apocalyptic twist, and a joining of the Shannarah series and the Word and the Void - absolute magic. I would recommend that someone thinking of buying this book, reads at least some of the other two series. As it would have no sense whatsoever, otherwise. Fantastic characterisation, and a gripping story throughout. I eagery await the next book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 1 August 2008
I'd never read a Terry Brooks novel before, despite his line of books being the type of thing I'm into. I took this out of the library recently, and when I started reading it I couldn't put it down.
It follows three main characters- Hawk, a child who is somehow special, in the way he leads a band of children in the ruins of the city. He 'haunts the ruins of his parent's world'.
Logan- A Knight of the Word, the mystic force that represents 'good'
Angel- Another Knight of the Word, helping compounds escape from the once-men and demons.

The story is set after an apocalypse, the country ravaged by chemicals, war and poisons. Most people live in compounds- barricaded buildings or complexes which protects them from reality. No real people live outside- the street children don't count, and neither do the many Freaks and once men that roam the US and probably the world. And neither do the demons.

Its a great book. Read it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
The Gypsy Morph: Genesis of Shannara Book Three
The Gypsy Morph: Genesis of Shannara Book Three by Terry Brooks (Paperback - 2 July 2009)
£7.19

The Elves Of Cintra: Genesis of Shannara, book 2
The Elves Of Cintra: Genesis of Shannara, book 2 by Terry Brooks (Paperback - 3 July 2008)
£7.99

Bearers Of The Black Staff: Legends of Shannara: Book One
Bearers Of The Black Staff: Legends of Shannara: Book One by Terry Brooks (Paperback - 7 July 2011)
£7.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.