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Areopagitica: Un Discurso Por la Libertad de Imprenta Dedicado al Parlamento de Inglaterra (Coleccion Conmemorativa 70 Aniversario) (Spanish) Paperback – 31 Dec 2005

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Paperback, 31 Dec 2005
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Product details

  • Paperback: 69 pages
  • Publisher: Fondo de Cultura Economica USA (31 Dec. 2005)
  • Language: Spanish
  • ISBN-10: 9681676963
  • ISBN-13: 978-9681676964
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 13.5 x 0.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Product Description

About the Author

ROBERT MORRIS is the senior pastor of Gateway Church in Southlake, Texas. He is a gifted communicator with over 20 years of experience imparting biblical principles on prosperity and personal growth. His passionate, practical and often humorous presentation touches believers and impacts even the unchurched. Pastor Robert resides in Texas with his wife and three children. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In this superbly argued and sometimes highly sarcastic speech to the English Parliament, John Milton defends masterfully totally unlicensed printing. He sees licensing as a new kind of Inquisition, which has nothing to do with morality and only aims at prohibiting the knowing of the truth and the freedom of learning. It is an insult of humanity. This speech constitutes also a formidable meditation on writing (art) and on the fear of the powerful of man's genius.

Inquisition
`Licensing crept out of the Inquisition' and was `snatched up by our inquisiturient bishops'. If these powerful men and their censors fear that their parishioners will be infected by `bad' books, the first book `to be removed out of the world' should be `the Bible itself', for `it describes the carnal sense of wicked men not unelegantly.'
For John Milton, licensing is not less than an oppressive, arbitrary and hypocrite tyranny: `the State shall be my governors, but not my critics.'

Liberty, freedom of writing and learning, truth, morality
`Liberty is the nurse of all great wits: give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience.'
For John Milton, `licensing is an affront offered to learning and the learned men. Not to count them fit to print his mind without an examiner is the greatest indignity to a free and knowing spirit that can be put upon him.' `He who destroys a good book, kills reason itself.'
`Licensing hinders and retards the importation of our richest merchandize, truth. Truth and understanding are not such wares as to be monopolized and traded by tickets and statutes and standards.'
`Evil' manners are `as perfectly learnt without books a thousand other ways. Yet `only books are to be prohibited.
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Beautifully written, in a nice printing from Arc Manor. Whether Milton's arguments really stand up, is another matter; certainly there is and has been plenty of censorship in England since 1644, both against the word, spoken and written and against the visual image. Then there is the question of Defamation, Heresy, and that feudalism which is Copyright: food for Milton to ponder down in Hades with Satan.
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"When complaints are freely heard, deeply considered and speedily reformed, then is the utmost bound of civil liberty attained, that wise men look for". John Milton, like a boss!

A letter from John Milton to the court regarding freedom of speech in the printing industry, 1644.
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Essential reading on free speech. I was hoping perhaps for an introduction, and perhaps some commentary, but this is only the text. Having said that, it is a perfect edition to be used as a text book, for common reading in the classroom. Large print and accessible.
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