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Area 7 Mass Market Paperback – 17 Feb 2003

94 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; Reprint edition (17 Feb. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312983220
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312983222
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 2.8 x 17.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (94 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 798,733 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Matthew Reilly wrote his first book, Contest, in 1994 whilst attending the University of New South Wales. It was rejected by every major publishing company.

This caused Reilly to self-publish 1,000 copies using money borrowed from his family.

Reilly went to a bookstore in Sydney and asked if he could place the copies on one of their book shelves. They accepted the offer. Very shortly after, the books had sold out and the owner of the bookstore called Reilly to order more books.

One copy was read by Pan Macmillan, who immediately signed Reilly up to write Ice Station, which became an international bestseller.

Since then, he has been published in over fifteen countries, including Norway, Australia, the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, The Netherlands, South Africa, Japan and China.

Reilly's main influences include Michael Crichton, Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, and possibly Art Bell.

Product Description

Amazon Review

Matthew Reilly's Area 7 shows an even more concentrated skill at keeping us turning the pages than his previous bestsellers Ice Station and Temple. He knows just the kind of book he wants to write, and he's repeatedly said that the key agenda behind his kinetic thrillers is to keep the reader's pulse quickened throughout.

In Area 7 America's most secret base is the eponymous Area 7, and hidden deep in the Utah desert, this high-tech Air Force installation is visited by very few unauthorised personnel. But when the President of the United States pays a call, he encounters a nasty surprise: a hostile force is waiting inside. And as mayhem erupts, Schofield, a young marine in the President's entourage, finds himself obliged to live up to his reputation: that he's a good man in a storm. Reilly's speciality is the steady accumulation of cliffhanging situations (as he demonstrated so readily in Temple) and he pulls off the trick with his usual aplomb in this one. If the President here seems considerably brighter than the current real-life incumbent, that's a minor distraction in a thriller that maintains a Rottweiler-like grip on our attention:

The flashlight was the only thing that saved Book II's life. Primarily because it blinded the man on top of the decompression chamber, if only for a moment. That was all the time Book II needed. His shotgun boomed, blasting their commando's goggles to pieces, sending him flying off the top of the chamber. It was a small victory, for at that exact moment, gunfire erupted around the darkened room as a legion of dark figures emerged...
--Barry Forshaw --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

The President is visiting Area 7, America's most secret base hidden deep in the Utah desert - but hostile forces are waiting inside. However, amongst the President's helicopter crew is the young marine Shane Schofield, hero of Ice Station and Temple. A third high voltage adventure thriller from the bestselling Australian writer. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mr. P. E. Walton on 25 Feb. 2006
Format: Paperback
I picked up this book with some trepidation after reading a few reviews but thankfully the result was well worth the effort. Yes elements of the story are somewhat too far fetched but it is no less unbelievable than a series of 24. The heroes continually get into ever increasingly tighter spots but manage to outsmart their opponents at every turn. Mr Reilly has produced an easy reading novel that is fun cross bred with 24 and Die Hard for a thrill a minute ride that helped me to finish this book much quicker than I ever manage to with a Clancy novel. I enjoyed it and have now started the follow up SCARECROW to see what new scrapes Mr Reilly can conjure up.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By D. Newstead VINE VOICE on 24 Aug. 2006
Format: Paperback
Well in my opinion anyway.

Forget Mission Impossible this is Mission Impossible and then some, with all sorts of action, presidents with ticking timebombs in them, missiles waiting to launch and some maniac wanting to create some kind of genocide. Granted Scarecrow and a lot of his colleagues would put Steve Austin (the bionic man) through his paces I felt that the worst part of the book was the end the last word on the end of the last page as the book certainly takes you to a different world full of action heroes and heroines and villains that are so over the top.

Get this book now.

Thats if your blood pressure can stand it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By S. Tilly on 1 Nov. 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I found this book something of a paradox. Chase and fight scenes that were really quite ludicrous; a list of superlatives that seemed to start and end with "shocking", a much overused description in this book; and a tendancy to overexaggerate ("a million shells ripped into his body"). Did I enjoy the book? Oh yes, I took it everywhere I went and literally couldn't put it down. It held my attention from start to finish and had some clever twists and turns to it. And needless to say the pace of the action was breathless - the whole book takes place in about 3 hours! I've already ordered the prequel and sequel to this book - I'm a Matthew Reilly fan now.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sam Tyler on 12 Nov. 2007
Format: Paperback
'Area 7' is a monster of a book seemingly written by a 12 year old with verbal diarrhoea - that's not to say that its not incredibly fun. A marine named Scholfield (codename Scarecrow) has been attached the helicopter that flies the President. They are on a secret visit to the mysterious Area 7, a covert science lab and airport hanger buried deep in the US desert. Things never run smoothly for the Scarecrow so when 50 rogue soldiers turn up intent on killing the Pres, he is the man to save the day. With bears, boats, planes, viruses, South Africans, Chinese, bad marines and a basement full of psychotic prisoners; you are in for a ride!

Its hard to dislike 'Area 7' as its one of the worst written books I have read, but Reilly writes with such enthusiasm that you feel mean criticising it. The story itself is ridiculous and convoluted with more twists and turns than Chubby Checker and the Fat Boys. The characters are also pretty poor with fewer dimensions than a sheet of A4. Despite all this, the book is crammed with high octane action and drags the reader along at break neck speed. This is daft entertainment at its best and if it were not for Reilly's insistence to reiterate things with explanation marks it could have scored higher just for being unashamedly hammy and fun.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. C. Mullan on 14 Mar. 2008
Format: Paperback
After being introduced to Matthew Reilly's books by my wife, with my first read being Temple. I have since been addicted to his high-octane style of writing. Being a massive fan of Cussler, I find Reilly a welcome change. He may not be everyone's cup of tea due to his unique unrealistic style of writing but one thing I can guarantee you is that once you start reading any of his books you won't be able to put it down, as is the case with Area 7.

This installment is the second in the "Scarecrow" series and follows Shane Schofield as he dodges bullets left, right and centre (and every other possible direction). There are some old faces and some new but the core of the story is fantastic with Reilly's premise for books usually being "What if this happened?". In this case that question involves the president, 'the football', a secret military installment, crazy weapons, futuristic vehicles, a space battle, a virus that kills certain races, a bunch of convicts and a crazy antagonist who will do anything to bring back the confederacy! How does he fit all that into 596 pages? Give it a go, and I'm sure that you won't be disappointed, regardless of how unrealistic the book MIGHT be.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 19 Sept. 2002
Format: Hardcover
Entertaining, if somewhat far fetched story line. Typical Reilly in that the action is non-stop and always unbelievable. Confines the story to one building, which adds to the claustraphobic feeling. There are lots of holes in the story, but dont dwell on them! Just enjoy it for what it is.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Rennie Petersen on 20 April 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Area 7" is a thriller containing an incredible amount of high-octane action. This huge amount of action, and the lack of realism in many of the things that happen, requires a great deal of suspension of disbelief on your part if you want to enjoy the book.
But there's more to "Area 7" than just page after page of action.
True, most of the book consists of action scenes with bullets flying everywhere and things exploding and a fantastic line-up of various groups of really nasty bad guys who are all out kill the good guys (and each other) in the most violent and horrifying way possible.
It's also true that the story is not particularly believable, nor are the characters very well developed. The bad guys in particular are nothing more than cardboard figures, and the good guys aren't much better when it comes to resembling real people.
But Matthew Reilly keeps you reading despite these weaknesses because he has a couple of tricks up his sleeve.
The plot is actually pretty interesting (despite being unrealistic), and there are a large number of imaginative plot elements and very creative twists and turns. Several times after you thought you'd worked out what's going on you discover that things are more complicated and the bad guys are more devious than you realized.
I especially liked the start of the book, where the leading bad guy, U.S. Air Force General Charles "Caesar" Russell, is executed in Leavenworth prison for treason and murder. But the execution doesn't "take" - as soon as his dead body is delivered to his Air Force cohorts they revive him! And at the same time we're informed that the newly inaugurated President of the USA has some kind of super-miniature electronic device implanted on his heart!
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