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Appointment in Dallas Mass Market Paperback – 1 Nov 2013


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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Pinnacle (1 Nov 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786033150
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786033157
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 1.6 x 17.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,174,784 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 July 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I first bought this book twenty five years ago or so. My copy is so worn out it has split down the middle. I was about to add a silver duct tape binding, when I discovered this reprint. If you haven't come across this little known book before do yourself a BIG favor and buy it. Hugh McDonald is not your typical conspiracy theorist. He was a on the "short list" when replacing the director of the FBI. This man has written many classic textbooks on interrogation techniques that are in use at police academies around the world. He invented the I-Denti-Kit, virtually eliminating the need for police sketch artists. In short, he is a master detective first. He makes a convincing argument on who killed JFK. (Interviewing the assassin makes for a pretty strong case.) He includes photos of the assassin and a complete timeline provided by the assassin on how he pulled of the crime of the century. If you want to know who hired the assassin you need to buy his sequel. "LBJ and the JFK Conspiracy"
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By john armitage on 2 Nov 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Halfway through this book I could'nt work out if I was reading a novel or a true account, of the assassination, surely if the author had contact, with the alleged assassin he could have done something to apprehend him, especially with the contacts he has made over his career, the alleged assassin says all shots were from behind when medical and eye witnesses state they believe there was strong evidence of shots and wounds from the front, in summing up the scenario immediately after the assassination, the author states Oswald was in such a panic after shooting Officer Tippit heran into the cinema theatre throwing money at the attendant, every book I have read says he walked in without paying, and that is why suspicion was aroused sorry just can't take this book to serious John Armitage
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 23 reviews
24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
Hugh knew more than is in this book. 27 May 2002
By Patricia A. Thomas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I actually knew Hugh C. McDonald. In the early 70s, I worked for a talent manager, Bob Marcucci ("The Idolmaker"), who represented Mr. McDonald in the promotion of his books, "Appointment In Dallas" and "The Hour of the Blue Fox." When I met him, Hugh was retired from the CIA and was writing his books and working in security for a southern California racetrack (Hollywood Park, I think) and interfacing with the IRS and FBI on matters such as illegal gambling and racketeering. I had the good fortune to read the follow-up manuscript to "Appointment In Dallas" entitled, "The Kennedy Conspiracy," in which he not only released more details about the Kennedy murder, but he also named three men whom he said were directly involved in the conspiracy and, at the time he wrote the manuscript, were still living. By the time I read his manuscript, two of the three men mentioned were dead with Ralph DeMorenschild being the only one remaining alive. A couple of months after I read the manuscript, an article appeared in the L.A. Times (not in a prominent location) telling of the death of DeMorenschild. It stated that he had given an interview some place in Belgium in which he said that he was going to go public with what he knew about the Kennedy assassination. A few days after the interview, he was killed by a shotgun blast to the head in a hotel room in Belgium. The article stated that the wound was self-inflicted.
The upshot of this is that Hugh tried for years to get "The Kennedy Conspiracy" published and no publisher would touch it. I've often wondered why.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Interesting premise, but flawed,,, 1 Dec 2009
By a customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
There probably still exists an academic oriented website owned by a scholar who is a determined defender of the Warren Commission Report. It has a great deal of interesting material, and one of these is a paper written by another scholar, another WC apologist, who felt the need to answer the question of why the material from the President's head hit Dallas motorcycle policeman Bobby Hargis with such force that he, Hargis, thought he had been shot.
Most people are aware that Hargis was riding IN BACK OF and TO THE LEFT OF the President's position in the limo. This would indicate the kill shot came from the front and to the right of the President, somewhere in the picket fence area of the Grassy Knoll.
The scholar answered the question of why a shot from the rear landed with such force on Hargis that he thought he had been shot by stating that there was a breeze blowing in Dealey Plaza that afternoon, from west to east, and it was this breeze that blew the material from the President's head backwards with such force. He really wrote that.
In his book McDonald is also a WC apologist, and his assassin named Saul fired all the shots from the rear, while Oswald was a patsy who was to be killed by Saul. Things didn't work out as planned, but Saul still did the job he was paid to perform.
The only problem is, the bullet that killed the President, coming from the rear as postulated, would surely have covered the two Secret Service men in the front seats, as well as the windshield of the limo, as Saul was firing from ABOVE the position of the President, and the bullet would have had a downward projection.
McDonald ignores all this, which appears to me a major flaw that makes his book not credible.
16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
A Professional's View of the JFK Murder 27 Sep 2002
By Maynard F. Allington - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Appointment in Dallas is an essential addition to the library of any serious scholar of the JFK murder. My background is criminology. Years ago, as a short term graduate student at USC, I sat through a four hour lecture by Hugh McDonald on crime scene investigation. He was then Chief of Detectives of the LA Police Department. He lectured on the "Starved Rock" murders in Chicago, a case that had stumped the Chicago authorities, and which he solved in a period of days. He lectured on concepts, rather than nuts and bolts, and it was evident to the class (all professional law enforcement officers) that he was one of the premier detective investigators in the country. You will see this for yourself when you read Appointment in Dallas. It's a meticulous look at the crime scene and the author's own investigation. In the early days following the release of the Warren Report, Hugh McDonald was treated somewhat cavalierly in the media for his belief in the existence of a second assassin. Time has certainly vindicated his judgment.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
A real page turner! You may read it in only one sitting! 11 July 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I first bought this book twenty five years ago or so. My copy is so worn out it has split down the middle. I was about to add a silver duct tape binding, when I discovered this reprint. If you haven't come across this little known book before do yourself a BIG favor and buy it. Hugh McDonald is not your typical conspiracy theorist. He was a on the "short list" when replacing the director of the FBI. This man has written many classic textbooks on interrogation techniques that are in use at police academies around the world. He invented the I-Denti-Kit, virtually eliminating the need for police sketch artists. In short, he is a master detective first. He makes a convincing argument on who killed JFK. (Interviewing the assassin makes for a pretty strong case.) He includes photos of the assassin and a complete timeline provided by the assassin on how he pulled of the crime of the century. If you want to know who hired the assassin you need to buy his sequel. "LBJ and the JFK Conspiracy"
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
The Secret Assassin 1 Oct 2011
By Ray Stephanson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Appointment in Dallas

Hugh C. McDonald was a member of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. His books are standard texts in most Police Academies. He holds patents on the Identi-Kit, and identification system used by police all over the world. He was a Major in Military Intelligence. In 1964 McDonald was head of security for Goldwater's Presidential campaign. One of his co-workers pointed out the second floor of the County Records Building in Dallas as where the fatal shot of JFK came from (Chapter I). Herman Kimsey told Hugh about the man who burst into his office while Hugh was there (Chapter II). He shot and killed JFK. McDonald read the Warren Report, but didn't believe their ballistics testimony (Chapter IX). He was shocked when he saw photography exhibit # 237. It was the man in Kimsey's office (see page 53). McDonald considered who was really behind the assassination (Chapter X).

Would an undercover agent recognize a photo (Chapter XI)? Was the flu in America the result of germ warfare (Chapter XIII)? An intruder in his room was stopped (Chapter XIV). A refugee made a statement (Chapter XVI). Kimsey warned McDonald against his research (Chapter XIX). McDonald returned to Europe (Chapter XX). He had a few near misses (p.114). McDonald learned of a new conspiracy (Chapter XXIII). Were amateurs being paid to assassinate officials? [Incredible.] Finally he meets Saul and they talk (Chapter XXIV). Saul tells his story (Chapter XXV). Saul would fire a bullet that disintegrated on contact and leave no traces (p.158). Part II tells what Saul did on November 22, 1963. Saul was supposed to shoot Harvey Oswald. [Would he have a clear shot without exposing himself (p.179)?] And so the story ends.

This book has no Table of Contents or Index to its 224 pages. Ballistic experts did not support a single-bullet conclusion. CE399 was a test bullet. [Who had access to Oswald's rifle to plant this bullet?] The experienced trauma doctors at Parkland Hospital said the throat wound was an entrance wound. The claim that the backwards movement of JFK's head was caused by a shot from the rear violates Newton's Law (a body in motion continues in the same direction). [Surely there are movies of executions that show a head snapping away from the gun that fired the bullet.] Appendix 2 fails to convince. Experts could not have shot Oswald if he was hidden away in a building. It would have been different for any man (or woman) on the street with a pistol. [Or would it? "Squeaky" wasn't shot.] What about a plan to shoot Oswald after he left the building (p.188)? McDonald says Oswald had to be killed so he couldn't talk (p.189)! Jack Ruby was connected to organized crime. Oswald's actions are not those of a man who just committed a murder (p.191).

Appendix 3 said the Warren Commission did not have even one expert police interrogator. [The autopsy of JFK did not have one experienced medical examiner.] No one asked if the assassination of JFK was done to support the interests of powerful groups (p.195). [Read "Who Killed Kennedy?" by Thomas G Buchanan.] Appendix 4 asked why Saul talked. Maybe by telling a trusted few he made sure the story would leak if he was bumped off? Appendix 5 analyzes Saul's personality and life. McDonald says the cover-up of the assassination had bad effects (Appendix 6). Yet this cynicism serves the interests of the Ruling Class (p.214). Appendix 7 lists his credentials: his commission as Major in Military Intelligence; graduate of the FBI National Academy; aircraft pilot for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department; thanks for his 26 years of service with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department; thanks from the city of Lakewood.

Why is Oswald "not guilty"? He was never convicted or even indicted! Why was he rubbed out two days later? To prevent him from proving his innocence! Lunch time is usually around noon. If Oswald went to lunch at noon and then washed down his meal with a bottle of soda from a machine when that policeman came by. Alive, he could have named the other people who were also in the lunchroom at that time (and they could have confirmed his alibi). Then the conspiracy would be obvious. Being in the second floor lunchroom solves the problem of hiding that rifle then running down four flights of stairs. Yes, this is my assumption, but it best explains the problem of Oswald's movements from the sixth to the second floor.

Another argument for Oswald's innocence is his denial of shooting the President. The killers of Presidents in the 19th century all boasted of their deed. So too those in the 20th century who attempted and failed. All used a pistol. Was Oswald lying about this? George O'Toole's book "The Assassination Tapes" explains why Oswald was telling the truth (or was crazy). The idea of a conspiracy also explains the differences in wounds seen in Parkland Hospital and those on the body in Bethesda. I think the conspirators simply sacrificed JFK's double to create a body whose wounds would fit the "lone gunman" theory. Why did the Establishment bump him off? JFK's use of drugs affected his judgment and risked a Nuclear War in October 1962. The book "Dr. Feelgood" explains JFK's health problems. Doesn't this theory best fit the known facts?
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