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Applying UML and Patterns: An Introduction to Object-Oriented Analysis and Design and the Unified Process Hardcover – 13 Jul 2001


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 656 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall; 2 edition (13 July 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0130925691
  • ISBN-13: 978-0130925695
  • Product Dimensions: 21 x 3 x 26.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 606,952 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Amazon Review

Good software starts with a good design, and Applying UML and Patterns' subtitle, "An Introduction to Object-oriented Analysis and Design (OOA/D) and the Unified Process" reflects this.

The first edition of Applying UML and Patterns became a standard. The second edition uses the unified process (UP) as the interactive process within which OOA/D is introduced and extends the case study used in the first edition. Other changes have been made to reflect the growing consensus on the most effective ways to work with OOA/D and patterns.

Although you will learn UML this isn't what Applying UML and Patterns is all about. It's designed to teach you to think of software as a collection of objects with properties and to manipulate the relationships between them. This is far more profound.

The case study enables Craig Larman to carry the design through to Java code. In practice you will need a basic understanding of OO programming to benefit from Applying UML and Patterns though you needn't know Java--you could implement the designs in the OO language of your choice with equal facility.

When it comes right down to it, Applying UML and Patterns is all about providing you with a language in which to think about software design. This is quite a different from learning a language in which to code a design.

A facility with OOA/D will enable you to design and discuss programs independent of code, to produce more elegant and maintainable software and to take a 30,000-foot view of the way your software interacts with the world. In effect, it can shift your viewpoint from that of a mechanic to the more sophisticated viewpoint of an engineer. --Steve Patient

From the Publisher

Table of contents
CONTENTS:

I. INTRODUCTION.

1. Object-Oriented Analysis and Design. 2. Introduction to a Development Process. 3. Defining Models and Artifacts.

II. PLAN AND ELABORATE PHASE.

4. Case Study: Point-of-Sale. 5. Understanding Requirements. 6. Use Cases: Describing Processes. 7. Ranking and Scheduling Use Cases. 8. Starting a Development Cycle.

III. ANALYZE PHASE (1).

9. Building a Conceptual Model. 10. Conceptual Model-Adding Associations. 11. Conceptual Model-Adding Attributes. 12. Recording Terms in the Glossary. 13. System Behavior-System Sequence Diagrams. 14. System Behavior-Contracts.

IV. DESIGN PHASE (1).

15. From Analysis to Design. 16. Describing Real Use Cases. 17. Collaboration Diagrams. 18. GRASP: Patterns for Assigning Responsibilities. 19. Designing a Solution with Objects and Patterns. 20. Determining Visibility. 21. Design Class Diagrams. 22. Issues in System Design.

V. CONSTRUCT PHASE (1).

23. Mapping Designs To Code. 24. Program Solution In Java.

VI. ANALYZE PHASE (2).

25. Choosing Development Cycle 2 Requirements. 26. Relating Multiple Use Cases. 27. Extending the Conceptual Model. 28. Generalization. 29. Packages: Organizing Elements. 30. Polishing the Conceptual Model. 31. Conceptual Model-Summary. 32. System Behavior. 33. Modeling Behavior in State Diagrams.

VII. DESIGN PHASE (2).

34. GRASP: More Patterns for Assigning Responsibilities.

35. Designing with More Patterns.

VIII. SPECIAL - TOPICS.

36. Other UML Notation. 37. Development Process Issues. 38. Frameworks, Patterns, and Persistence. Appendix A. Recommended Readings. Appendix B. Sample Development Activities and Models. Bibliography. Glossary. Index. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 29 Oct 2001
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
At last a book about using UML, rather than simply describing the elements of the language.
Many readers will be familiar with OO concepts, but not so knowledgable about elements in UML beyond class diagrams. This book helps fill that gap.
The overarching theme is the discussion of a single project and you are shown you how to go through the Analysis and Design stages ( two cycles ) using UML.
It's oriented towards Use Cases, so if this is what you want to learn about you'll be happy.
It also covers collaboration and system sequence diagrams ( two UML standard diagrams ) and introduces constructs of the authors own e.g. contracts.
Some UML artefacts are brushed over - state diagrams and activation diagrams - so if you want to know how to use these, consult another source.
Although good as a primer, I was not convinced by this book that Use Cases are the best way to understand system requirements.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 9 Jun 1999
Format: Hardcover
I wanted a book that: a) Introduced UML b) Wrapped a process around UML and actually apply it to via a case study c) Refer to common design idioms (patterns) where applicable d) Use a modern language for any illustration but not get bogged down in length code samples
Craig comes out on top on all 4 accounts. He cuts through a lot of the jargon (explaining clearly) and even spends time on requirements specification and use cases (analysis and design - and "actually" differentiates between them). Most authors merely give a 2 page gloss over on use cases - yet they also state what a core part of analysis they form. Craig gives them the attention they deserve. He also does a great job on collaboration diagrams and appropriately includes a second iteration in the development process, so the architect can see how the diagrams from UML are intended to evolve from one development cycle to the next.
He then takes some of the popular gang of four patterns and explains in UML notation how these could be applied in subsequent iterations.
Overall a very good introduction. Although no one book can cover everything on a topic, Craig does what a lot of other authors flounder to achieve in books double the size.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 31 Mar 1999
Format: Hardcover
I appear to be somewhat less optimistic about this book than other reviewers. In general, I thought it didn't do enough justice to any one of the three topics I listed above (OO development processes, UML, design patterns). Some UML notation features are barely mentioned until the last section of the book; and then they are just very briefly mentioned. I found the first three parts of the book somewhat lacking in substance. The patterns section (a relatively small portion of the book) was quite useful.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Paul Hart on 5 Mar 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book is more about how to run a development project using the Unified process Unified Process than about UML and Patterns. The subtitle 'An introduction to Object Oriented Analysis and Design and the Unified Process' is more accurate, and would have been even for accurate if it has been 'An introduction to Object Oriented Analysis and Design using the Unified Process'
Following a single project, it shows the principles behind UP's iterative methodology, gives a good understanding of how UML can be used to support the Analysis and Design Process, provides an explanation of the more basic patterns that you can use in OO design, and probably most importantly drums home some basic lessons in what makes for good OO design.
The book has definately inspired me to try and get us to make use of some of the UP methodology within my development team.
For developers more interested in design than analysis and process it is definitely worth buying for the OO design advice alone (Chapter 21 onwards) and then dipping back in to fill in details of the UML notation knowledge as required.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 24 Mar 1999
Format: Hardcover
I've been developing software systems with C & C++ for about 5 years now with the infamous "Rush To Code" development process. Craig's book has not only provided me with a generalized roadmap for the software development process, but it has given me a solid understanding of the most essential features of UML and some excellent references for additional printed resources on this topic. After finishing the book this morning, I am starting development of my first project using UML. That pretty much explains the books usefulness.
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Format: Hardcover
Bueno mis chavos, este libro está mucho más entendible que el Design Patterns. De hecho, creo que para una experiencia en objetos de poco tiempo (menos de cinco años) necesitamos primero este libro para llegarle al Design Patterns. El libro es excelente. Tiene un conjunto de Patterns (GRASP) que a primera vista (sobretodo después de haber incursionado en los del GofF) parecen muy, muy sencillos y triviales. Sin embargo, después de un rato de estarlos mascando en algún sistema real, se verá el poder de los GRASP. De aquí implementar varios de los del GofF ya parece mucho más natural. Además, por si fuera poco, te va llevando de la mano hacia un manejo decente de UML. Unas palabras más: el punto es que después de una semana que lo haz leído y estás desarrollando algún sistema, te van cayendo muchos veintes y de pronto tu código parece que lo ha hecho otra persona mucho más grueso que tú. Para los que manejan equipo de desarrollo también vale la pena por otra razón saber Patterns y UML, la comunicación de los problemas y soluciones se hace en un lenguaje común y poderoso; si en tu compañía se comienza a oír frases como "hazte los Use Cases y recuerda que 'chuchita' debe ser un Singleton", o "esa clase ya tiene baja cohesión y tiene mucho acoplamiento con esa otra, así que métele otro nivel de indirección", etc., significa que van por buen camino. CÓMPRENLO, LÉANLO Y PRACTÍQUENLO.
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