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on 28 October 2006
I waited a long time for the release of the wireless variant of Apple's Mighty Mouse; having been a user of the wireless Apple Pro Mouse for two years, I did not want to sacrifice my wire-free set-up when the original wired Mighty Mouse was announced.

Well, the wait was worth it. Apple Mighty Mouse Wireless is the same size as the wireless Pro Mouse but is made of a more opaque white plastic, which gives it a cleaner look. I was pleasantly surprised to notice that the mouse is lighter than the older wireless Pro Mouse that it replaces. It seems to glide across my desk more smoothly. Oh, and clicking is considerably quieter with the new mouse. (Is this too much detail?)

Functionally, Apple Mighty Mouse Wireless is in a different league from the old Pro Mouse. I no longer have to ctrl-click to access right-click functions within Mac OS and applications. The scroll-ball works wonderfully, and makes navigation (up and down, left and right) within applications and the OS so much quicker. My only complaint is that the ball feels a little on the small side to me.

Additional functions are accessed by either clicking whilst the scroll-ball is depressed or squeezing the sides of the mouse together. These functions, along the basic right/left click and scroll-ball behaviour are programmable from within the new Mouse System Preference panel that is provided on the installation CD.

As with all Apple products, set-up was extremely straight forward. I loaded the software from the enclosed installation CD, powered the mouse and restarted my Mac. Job done. Lost connections, for example due to removal of batteries, are recovered within seconds by Mac OS.

Apple has managed to retain the sleek look of its long-standing, single button mouse whilst cramming in all the functionality of a state-of-the-art, optical, four button, 2D scroll mouse!

Highly recommended.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 30 January 2007
I got one of these as a replacement for a Kensington Pocket Mouse. Right away I liked the absence of the "tail" and the freedom that gave me. I also liked the more solid, heavier feel (you can adjust the weight by putting in either one or two batteries).

There are no actual left and right buttons. Instead, there's a sort of rocker switch in the base which activates when you press the top of the mouse shell where the buttons ought to be. This takes a bit of getting used to. In particular, you need to avoid resting your hand too heavily on the mouse, which prevents it from rocking correctly.

The multi-directional scroll ball has a very light feel to it - you literally just need to brush it wish your fingertip. It feels fragile and it is: after 5 months of light but daily use the upward scroll function has now become intermittent. Another problem is the button function of the scroll ball. The ball is so delicate that pressing the button to click it invariably means you move the position of the ball slightly, which is annoying if you're trying to click on an item in a list.

The fourth button is built into the finger rests on the side of the mouse. You need to use a lot of pressure to activate it, squeezing the mouse as if you're trying to throttle the life out of it. I guess that's so you don't keep pressing it accidentally while you're mousing, but the difficulty of operating it limits its value for me.

Battery use is reasonable (about 2 months with both batteries installed) but only if you use alkali non-rechargeables. I've tried two types of rechargeable batteries, but I only get about a week's use before the "low battery" warning comes up. When I do replace the batteries the mouse doesn't always link up with my Mac, so I have to use my old USB mouse in order to navigate to the Bluetooth menu and re-establish the connection.

The software that comes with it allows you to set up some basic functions for the buttons, but if you want to program different functions for different applications, you'll need to install the shareware application SteerMouse. Unfortunately the excellent (and free) Kensington MouseWorks is not compatible with Mighty Mouse.
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on 22 November 2007
I loved this mouse from the very beginning - its ability to work on almost any surface without a mouse pad is a big plus. Some of the functionality like displaying all open windows by pressing the buttons on the side of the mouse (if programmed) is easier accessible with the mouse. What I find distracting every now and then is that it's easy to press the side buttons when you do a drag&drop operation, so depending on what functions you have programmed this can be very annoying. The scroll ball seems a little too small but feels right when you get used to it. Sometimes the horizontal movements are a bit too rapid but I assume that can be adjusted with the mouse configuration. Overall a good device, I don't regret the purchase!
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