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Apocalypso Paperback – 1 Jul 1999


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Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Corgi; New Ed edition (1 July 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0552145890
  • ISBN-13: 978-0552145893
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 2.5 x 17.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 610,751 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Robert Rankin describes himself as a teller of tall tales. The Morning Star describes him as 'The Master of Silliness', and his publisher describes him as The Master of Far Fetched Fiction. He is the author of more than thirty novels, of which he has sold millions of copies, and he is published - and making people laugh - around the world.

Despite his remarkable publishing success, Robert has never taken himself too seriously. He loves going on tour, signing books for readers, and his appearances at signings and conventions are legendary, often including a stand-up routine, a song (accompanied by his 'air-ukulele'), and an always-entertaining question-and-answer session. Robert Rankin is a great entertainer, whether in person or through his novels, with wit, humour and an incredible personal warmth.

But that's not all! In addition to being a talented writer, comedian and musician, he's also an incredible artist . . . so incredible, that he creates his own stunning book covers.

Reading his books can and will inspire you, scare you, thrill you and, above all, entertain you. His novels are an outlet for the soul, and food for the imagination.


The Brentford Trilogy:

The Antipope
The Brentford Triangle
East of Ealing
The Sprouts of Wrath
The Brentford Chainstore Massacre
Sex and Drugs and Sausage Rolls
Knees Up Mother Earth
The Brightonomicon

The Armageddon Trilogy:

Armageddon: The Musical
They Came and Ate Us
The Suburban Book of the Dead

Cornelius Murphy Novels:

The Book of Ultimate Truths
Raiders of the Lost Car Park
The Most Amazing Man Who Ever Lived

The Trilogy That Dare Not Speak Its Name:

Sprout Mask Replica
The Dance of the Voodoo Handbag
Waiting for Godalming

The Witches Trilogy:

The Witches of Chiswick
Knees Up Mother Earth
The Brightonomicon

Eddie Bear Novels:

The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse
The Toyminator

Standalone Novels:

The Greatest Show Off Earth
The Garden of Unearthly Delights
A Dog Called Demolition
Nostradamus Ate My Hamster
Apocalypso
Snuff Fiction
Web Site Story
The Fandom of the Operator
The Da-da-de-da-da Code
Necrophenia

Product Description

Amazon Review

Robert Rankin's comic fantasies have a laddish good humour which rely heavily, if not excessively, on teasing, class and beer. His protagonists are always forced to compete in a world in which someone else has a silver spoon in their mouth; they muddle their way through his amiably Heath-Robinsonish plots by a mixture of chutzpah, bluster and endurance. Porrig, hero of Apocalypso has a bad attitude that makes even his parents dislike him, but he inherits a shop from a conjuror uncle--a shop which serves as a gateway to other worlds. Not only has he to redeem his uncle from damnation, he also has to save the world from an unpleasant alien vegetable with the power to cloud human minds. Amid all this, we find out what Nelson's Column is for, why railway ticket clerks take so long to sell tickets and the secret that lurks under Mornington Crescent Underground Station. Rankin's humour is a scatter-shot that misses targets as often as it hits, but his unabashed preparedness to use old jokes and the crudest of slapstick is part of a shaggy-dog enthusiasm that is more endearing than otherwise. --Roz Kaveney

Review

"'We read Rankin for his exuberant salmagundi of old jokes, myths urban and otherwise, catchphrases, liberatingly crazy ideas, running gags, recurring characters and locations, unreliable autobiogrpahical anecdotes...His impressively individual style means that he becomes funnier the more you read him'" Independent "'He does for England what Spike Milligan does for Ireland. There can be no higher praise'" Mail on Sunday

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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jane Aland VINE VOICE on 18 Mar. 2005
Format: Paperback
Apocalypso, Robert Rankin's 18th novel, struggles a little during it's first half, with two seemingly unconnected tales; one concerning a young lad called Porrig who inherits a magical bookshop, and the other telling the tale of a god-like alien vegetable's awakening from cryogenic suspension and it's plan to enslave humanity - this being Robert Rankin the alien bears a liking not dissimilar to that of a giant sprout. The tale of the alien also features that trio of investigators Sir John Rimmer, Dr Harney, and Danbury Collins, the psychic youth and masturbator, who appeared in The Garden of Unearthly Delights and Sprout Mask Replica, although as they had previously only really appeared in cameos this book is well suited for the first time Rankin reader.
The first half of the novel ambles along in a reasonably pleasant fashion, but it's nothing we haven't had from Rankin before, and with his typically Rankin-ish mysterious family inheritance, and his foot in mouth habit not quite working as a running gag, hero Porrig fails to really engage with the reader.
It's only when the two story strands combine in a tale taking in alternate realities vibrating on different harmonic frequencies, a stage magician called Apocalypso caught in his own version of hell, and an 18inch tall imp called Rippington (that's him on the cover) who is obsessed with his own genitalia (or 'rubbing parts' as he calls them), that Apocalypso clicks into top gear, and the novels second half is as good as anything Rankin has ever written, with some laugh out loud jokes and terrific set-pieces.
While I wouldn't say Apocalypso was consistent enough to rank as one of Rankin's very best books, its still a damn fine comedy - an inventive satire on Hollywood action film cliché with even more bum jokes and knob gags than normal. Apocalypso is a marvellous example of good toilet humour, so come on in, the water's lovely!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 19 Jan. 1999
Format: Hardcover
Mr Rankin entertains once again with a confused plot regarding the true controllers of the planet and the great Apocalypso. There are areas of the book which show a fertile imagination excellently manipulating bizzarre situations, and if developed further, the title would make for a great read. Unfortunately, in this particular outing, Mr Rankin lets his rather unnescessary running gag lead the book. One gets the idea that the thread was lost long before the end and that situations were created purely to feed into the running gag. I know that the running gags in his books are amongst his trademarks (General Electric Minigun etc..) but this book is so dominated by the one theme - (You'll know what I'm talking about if you read the book.)- that it ceases to become literature and becomes something that fifth formers would giggle over in the school toilets. This is a flat joke ... an overplayed hand. Maybe if a bit more time was taken with the current title rather than pushing for a new release in 6 months time, he might produce a more creditable effort. He is a very witty and amusing man ... He doesn't need smut & innuendo to satisfy his followers. I would be happier if he could produce one quality Item every two years instead of production line inadequacies such as this at regular six month periods.... Snuff Fiction .......June 99.... Sex & drugs & Sausage rolls ......December 99.
Release predictabilty = quality decline!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 25 Aug. 2000
Format: Paperback
While reading this book you are never drawn away,on almost every page there is a reason to pee your pants while laughing. This book is beyond hillerious. You'll be intrigued all the way through. Robert Rankin is a brilliant writer and always maneges to make you laugh. THis book is a perfect example of his work. So read and laugh
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By BR on 1 Aug. 2006
Format: Paperback
I've read Rankin books previously, but this book was the one of his I have most enjoyed.

The humour throughout is fantastic and Rankin, so often the master of the running gag, is in inspired form.

The plot is a parody of a standard alien invasion type scenario, but Rankin manages to put his own unique twist on events.

Some Rankin books can be a bit too fantasy based. This book is not like that, and I would recommend it to anyone who enjoys humourous books.

Overall this is an excellent, light-hearted book that combines some very funny characters with some fantastic gags throughout.

Well worth reading and worth 5 stars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 May 1999
Format: Hardcover
The thing about Rankin is that you know what you are going to get. He's almost the Status Quo of comic litereature. That is his strength. It is also his weakness but who cares. This story is every bit as funny as all the others. Like eating Milky Ways his books are great for reading in between heavier books, and he has never ruined my appetite. He is not as good as Flann O Brien, (an obvious influence) but he is definitely better than the Discworlds. (a bit controversial that??) Nobody reads Rankin for any reason than having a quick (cheap?) laugh. Long may he continue, more Pooley and O Malley please.
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Format: Paperback
I picked this book up when I was much younger and haven't read it since but the plot has never left me. It was fantastic and although it may not be the best thing since sliced bread I prefer a nice thick slab anyway! I remember coming home from the library with this and few other books which I can't remember the names of now. I sat on my sofa and instantly became engrossed in this hilarious tale. The jokes are plentiful, the humour is top class and the serious bits - if they can be called so - hit home because of that. So while the book is all a bit of fun it also mirrors real life in so many detailed ways that you'll be able to relate to some of the situations which seemed so fantastical as younger reader.
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