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Antarctica (Lonely Planet Country Guides) [Paperback]

Jeff Rubin
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Lonely Planet Antarctica (Travel Guide) Lonely Planet Antarctica (Travel Guide) 3.0 out of 5 stars (1)
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Book Description

1 Nov 2008 Lonely Planet Country Guides
Discover Antarctica
Feel the salty kiss of sea mist when nearby whales exhale their startlingly loud 'ffffffffffffffffff' next to your boat
Sneak a peak a the secret harbor of Deception Island, where you can sail inside a restless volcano
Pay homage to intrepid explorers at their base camps, where objects remain eerily preserved a century later
In This Guide
Five authors, 30 specialists, a supporting cast of thousands of emperor penguins
Expanded coverage of environmental issues, climate change and ways travelers can make a difference
Complete pre-trip planning information for visits by air, private yacht, cruise ship or resupply vessel
Content updated daily - visit lonelyplanet.com


Product details

  • Paperback: 380 pages
  • Publisher: Lonely Planet Publications; 4th Revised edition edition (1 Nov 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1741045495
  • ISBN-13: 978-1741045499
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 2 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 374,625 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

As usual, the guidebook standard is set by Lonely Planet.

-- Outside (USA) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I know where I'm going 24 April 2009
Format:Paperback
I travel for pleasure, and photography. I read up about a destination long before the trip begins, so I know what to expect, where to find good food and accommodation and to ensure that I don't waste time and energy when I get there. We're booked to leave for Antarctica on 1 Feb 2010.

I always start trip-planning with Lonely Planet and Rough Guides, supplemented by internet 'research. For Antarctica, no RG is available, but I doubt that there is much that could be added to this comprehensive and attractive LP Guide as a means of preparation. My ultimate verdict will have to wait till we get back.

The Guide recognises that Antarctic tourists are most likely to arrive by ship, probably via South America, and may visit the Falkland islands and South Georgia as well as the Antarctic Peninsula, so it covers these places and deals with all the other modes of travel and possible directions of entry as well. The most popular landing sites are well-described, together with information on research stations, historic sites and places few of us are likely to be able or dare to visit. Brief accounts of Antarctic Exploration and recommended follow-up reads may require a warm blanket and a hot drink.
Access to various places is explained, applying to the ships, as well as the small boats used for in-shore cruising and landing. Blunt assessments are given of the potential for human beings to destroy the pristine environment and specific do's and don'ts for responsible behaviour, with warnings to observe best practice even if your tour-guides are lax in explaining it.
I hope that following the advice in this book will ensure that I leave no trace and take nothing away but my memories from this awesome place.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Antarctica - Lonely Planet Guide 14 Jan 2012
Format:Paperback
Great little book with good coverage of the major stopping-off points, research stations, animals and birds. Realistic price. Has kept us occupied all Xmas. Bit low on restaurants and youth hostels though! Not a bit like the other LP guides!
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good all round guide to Antarctica 2 Mar 2001
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This is a good all round guide to Antarctica but some of the islands get sparse treatment eg South Georgia.
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Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
32 of 33 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Little guidance for the prospective traveler 7 Sep 2010
By dickh - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book, while relatively well written with a good survey of the exploration history of the continent and much detail on the many parts of Antarctica where virtually no one goes, is almost totally useless as a travel guide.

The single, by far most important decision that a prospective traveler makes is to choose the type of ship and, within the type, which individual ship. According to IAATO there were some 38,000 visitors to Antarctica during the 2009/2010 season. Almost exactly half were passengers on large standard cruise ships that the big operators reposition to the Valparaiso (Chile) to Buenos Aires route during the Northern Hemisphere winter. As a little "bonus extra" these ships skirt Antarctica as they round the Horn and let their passengers view the continent between trips to the groaning buffet tables. Ships of more than 1000 passengers make no landings, while ships with between 400 and 1000 do sometime make a single landing of groups of 100 or less. The same is the case for ships of between 100 and 400 passengers which may venture to make a couple of landings.

The other half, some 19,000, opt for one of the "expedition travel" choices. The vast majority of these book a cruise on one of the roughly 20 ice strengthened ships that are able to navigate in Antarctic waters and, since they carry less than 100 passengers, can land passengers on the continent. As Mr. Rubin points out in the book, 80% of these travelers visit 30 different spots on the Antarctic Peninsula and half of these visit just 10 of the sites, and finally 30% visit only 5.

Therefore, while the 19 pages on the Antarctic Peninsula are useful, I question what value the other 200 pages on East Antarctica, Ross Sea, Weddell Sea, pre-Antarctic Islands and even South Georgia, the Falklands etc are since no more than a handful of tourists visit these locations.

But the real failure is that there is almost no information that could help prospective visitors choose with whom they will travel. There are obviously vast differences between the big cruise ships and the expedition ones. For the purpose of this discussion let's put aside passengers on the big cruise ships; they are at best accidental visitors to Antarctica. But there are also huge differences between the expedition ships. About half are Russian research vessels that are chartered out to large tour operators for the season. They are technically good ships but accommodations are often Spartan and onboard service frequently spotty. At the other end of the spectrum are the Lindblad ships and the Hapag-Lloyd ones which are super luxury and with price tags in accordance.

Then there are several ships in between, including the only two locally owned ships, the Chilean Antarctic Dream ( [...] ) and the Argentine Ushuaia ([...] ). Both offer typical cuisine of the two countries with notable examples of both countries wines. The Antarctic Dream is a bit more upscale while the Ushuaia is somewhat more for the backpacker set.

In short what this guide book lacks is guidance on the most important decision that an Antarctic traveler will make; how to get there.
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely best and most complete travel guide to The Ice. 22 Dec 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
If you plan a trip to The Ice, you will find this book invaluable. If you do not, you will find it fascinating, and it will make you want to go. In addition to all manner of practical advice for travelers, it is packed with thorough and interesting history of the continent, its wildlife, its geography, and also contains tempting suggestions for further non-fiction and fiction reading, films and videos, and even CD's. It is written with grace and humor, and contains really useful maps and charts. (How about that map of "Non-Existent Islands"!) Highest recommendation.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly good guide from Lonely Planet 15 May 2009
By Enjolras - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I usually associate Lonely Planet guides with backpackers and big cities. However, Lonely Planet did a great job with this tour guide for Antarctica. I used it this past winter during my cruise to Antarctica. It provides very useful background on the key sites and maps on the continent. It covers the history of exploration and international treaties covering the continent. It also has a decent section on Antarctic wildlife (although I would still recommend a dedicated book on the wildlife). More importantly, the book suggests the best sites for pictures and wildlife-viewing. While Lonely Planet isn't a replacement for a book on Antarctic wildlife, this book will help you take advantage of everything the "white continent" has to offer.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be considered an essential guide for anyone traveling to or through the region of the Antarctica 9 Feb 2009
By Midwest Book Review - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
While visiting the Antarctic Circle isn't in most people's plans when they think of traveling the globe, there is a great deal to interest both the causal visitor, the scientist, and the commercial traveler. That's where Jeff Rubin's compact, 380-page travel guide compendium of facts, maps, advice, and descriptive commentary comes in. A wealth of essential background information that includes how to start planning for a trip to antarctica, itineraries, history, expeditions, culture, environment, wildlife, as well as antarctic science are all relevant issues, and provided with solid information for the curious reader. The remaining chapters of Jeff Rubin's "Antarctica" guide book is organized regionally beginning with the Southern Ocean; and continuing with South Georgia, Shag Rocks & South Orkney Islands; Falkland Islands/Isles Malvinas; South Shetland Islands; Other Peri-Antarctic Islands; Antarctic Peninsula & Weddell Sea; Ross Sea; East Antarctica; and the South Pole. Enhanced with the inclusion of a directory, the Antarctic Treaty, a section on Transportation and another on Health, a glossary, an Index, the World Time Zones, and more, Jeff Rubin's "Antarctica" should be considered an essential guide for anyone traveling to or through the region of the Antarctica.
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for my friend! 8 Feb 2012
By Nicole - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I bought this as a gift for a friend who wants to go to Antarctica. She LOVED it! It's really the best guide book I could find on Antarctica and I looked EVERYWHERE. It came quickly with Amazon Prime.
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