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Annie Hall [DVD]


Price: £11.27 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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£11.27 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 8 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Actors: Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Tony Roberts, Carol Kane, Paul Simon
  • Directors: Woody Allen
  • Writers: Woody Allen, Marshall Brickman
  • Producers: Charles H. Joffe, Fred T. Gallo, Jack Rollins, Robert Greenhut
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: Spanish, German, French, Italian, English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, German, French, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Danish, Polish, Dutch, Finnish
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: German, English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested) (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Run Time: 93 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00004XOCX
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 108,947 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

DVD

From Amazon.co.uk

Annie Hall is one of the truest, most bittersweet romances on film. In it, Allen plays a thinly disguised version of himself: Alvy Singer, a successful--if neurotic--television comedian living in Manhattan. Annie (the wholesomely luminous Dianne Keaton) is a Midwestern transplant who dabbles in photography and sings in small clubs. When the two meet, the sparks are immediate--if repressed. Alone in her apartment for the first time, Alvy and Annie navigate a minefield of self-conscious "is-this-person-someone-I'd-want-to-get-involved-with?" conversation. As they speak, subtitles flash their unspoken thoughts: the likes of "I'm not smart enough for him" and "I sound like a jerk". Despite all their caution, they connect, and we're swept up in the flush of their new romance. Allen's antic sensibility shines here in a series of flashbacks to Alvy's childhood, growing up, quite literally, under a rumbling roller coaster. His boisterous Jewish family's dinner table shares a split screen with the WASP-y Hall's tight-lipped holiday table, one Alvy has joined for the first time. His position as outsider is incontestable when he looks down the table and sizes up Annie's "Grammy Hall" as "a classic Jew-hater".

The relationship arcs, as does Annie's growing desire for independence. It quickly becomes clear that the two are on separate tracks, as what was once endearing becomes annoying. Annie Hall embraces Allen's central themes--his love affair with New York (and hatred of Los Angeles), how impossible relationships are, and his fear of death. But their balance is just right, the chemistry between Allen's worry-wart Alvy and Keaton's gangly, loopy Annie is one of the screen's best pairings. It couldn't be more engaging. --Susan Benson --This text refers to an alternate DVD edition.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jim on 3 Nov. 2013
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I am very disappointed with the Blu Ray of Annie Hall. It has a major audio sync issue. The sound is about half a second out in places, especially during the monologue at the beginning. I have been sent a replacement, which also has the issue. I have tested both discs on three players:

Sony Playstation 3 (Slim top loader)
Sony BDP-S185
Samsung BD-E5300

They are the same on the two Sony players and slightly worse on the Samsung! Some scenes are almost in sync, and others are noticeably out. Fast forwarding or re-winding makes the problem worse. The film is unwatchable.

This issue has been widely reported on the internet, but a re-call has not been announced yet. Some people with high end Blu Ray players have reported that the sync issue does not affect them.

Buyer beware!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Philoctetes TOP 500 REVIEWER on 8 Jun. 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Just got this DVD to replace our old VHS one. Love the colour and sharpness against the murky old tape we were used to. You get scene access and the original trailer.

You've got to admire Allen, not only as writer/director/actor, but also as writer willing to assign himself a leading role that is not altogether sympathetic. It starts and ends with his character's - comedian Alvie Singer - views on life and relationships. He looks back on his relationship with singer Annie Hall, the time frame jumping back and forth from different stages of their relationship, his first two wives, her former relationships, his childhood, their breakup, etc. This method of storytelling really keeps you on your toes.

Strange, but it only really sunk in now, on the umpteenth viewing, that Alvie and his friend Rob continually refer to each other as Max, for some private reason. I still don't know what Alvie means when he tells his second wife that he hates the country because there's no place to walk after dinner. Aside from that, this is a very funny and seminal film about a loving but problematic relationship between a neurotic jewish comedian and a kooky insecure nightclub singer.

An intelligent comedy that would make an ideal introduction to Allen's oeuvre. I still think Love & Death is the funniest one, Play It Again Sam the most romantic, Stardust Memories the most artistic. A personal favourite: Manhattan [DVD]
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By flahr on 27 April 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Annie Hall is a rather odd film, with Allen's character - a neurotic Jewish comedian, that must have been a stretch for him to play - frequently addressing us directly, in one scene switching seamlessly from real-life to fantasy when annoyed by a boor behind him in a movie queue, in others suddenly becoming a cartoon character or using subtitles to show the subtext in his and Annie's first conversation. But never mind this playing with the form because quite apart from that Annie Hall is a very funny film: it's because Alvy Singer's romance with Annie Hall (and with Brooklyn) is so affecting and awkwardly believable that it's so hilarious. Enjoyable, cheering - and only an hour and a half long! - I'd recommend Annie Hall to anyone.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By SJP29 on 30 May 2003
Format: DVD
What is there to say? If you haven't seen this film, you really don't know what you're missing. This is Allen's most celebrated masterpiece, and shows Diane Keaton and Woody at their best (Keaton's singing voice is as uplifting as her acting!). The relationship between Alvy Singer and Annie Hall is portrayed with the closest attention to detail, so that whether it is waiting in line to see a movie, buying books for one another, persuading Annie to take up an academic course or photographing Alvy during a very amusing lobster incident, the result is highly effective. You know, it's like the old Groucho Marx joke: "I don't want to join any club that will take me as a member"; this is Alvy's maxim; a man who is never satisfied, but always wants invitations! Annie, the nightclub singer, is, at the same time, just like Alvy and nothing like him - what is it they have in common? The answer is their individuality. From the moment Annie utters her non-sensical phrase, "La Di Da", Alvy is in awe. It is a relationship of mutual appreciation as much as it is companionship. The relationship is doomed to fail, but the journey from friendship to love, and love to friendship, and - guess what? - friendship to love again is compelling to watch. Alvy can't communicate with other women in the way that he does with Annie, to the point that there is no room for laughter: [Alvy] "I haven't been myself since I quit smoking" [Some girl] "O, when did you quit smoking?" [Alvy] "Sixteen years ago" [Some girl] "Wait, I don't get it. Is it a joke?". Well, you decide. This film is one on many levels, with Freudian undertones, and musical overtones, and each viewing is a new experience. What if Annie had married Alvy, for example? Her name would, ironically, be Annie Singer! See this film, or don't call yourself a Woody Allen fan!
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By G Dogg on 10 Feb. 2013
Format: DVD
[Spoilers Ahead]

After watching Allen's latest films, we embraced Annie Hall fully. Allen knows New York better than other locales. More importantly, his actors in Annie Hall are distinguished. So many characters in Allen's films through the years are more or less playing Woody Allen. That's incongruous in recent films when mall-brats read his script... "maturely." The players in Annie Hall have their own voices and let Allen play Allen. Tony Roberts shrugs off Allen's paranoia, Carol Kane sees through his complex stereotyping, Paul Simon plays against type - or plays one of his bi-coastal types - as the laid back guy, and Jeff Goldblum can't remember his mantra. (I forget the characters names -- hey, look man, names are just labels and I don't get into that). In one of his not-too-much-later films, Allen counters "You're a self-hating Jew" with "No, I hate myself - but not because I'm Jewish." One has to wonder if Allen wants to stay in New York because he's a masochist. That's one for the psychiatrists. Annie Hall wants to stay in (Allen's simply stereotyped) LA. Who can blame her? She starts anew as, it turns out, an equal to Allen and people with "III" and "IV" after their names. And with a little Pilates she can get more in tune with herself, get in touch with mind spirit body.

Finally, a film where Allen has equals.
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