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Annexed: The Powerful Story of the Boy Who Loved Anne Frank MP3 CD – Audiobook, 4 Oct 2010


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Product details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Corporation; MP3 Una edition (4 Oct. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1441878106
  • ISBN-13: 978-1441878106
  • Product Dimensions: 13.7 x 1.3 x 19 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)

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Review

A delicate, poised and scrupulous re-enactment. -- Mal Peet Guardian Dogar's decision to write the novel from Peter's point of view is inspired. (His) story is complex and moving (and) his voice is eloquent. -- Irish Times John Boyne Dogar has ... done the memory of Anne Frank a great service Mal Peet Dogar has been utterly respectful ... [Annexed is] an author trying to get her head around a time of atrocity and how it perhaps felt for one ordinary young man in extraordinary circumstances. -- Keith Gray The Scotsman Peter's story is complex and moving. Irish Times --This text refers to the Digital Download edition.

Review

"A delicate, poised and scrupulous re-enactment." (The Guardian)

"A powerful and captivating story... told in intense, harrowing detail." (The Bookseller)

"Dogar's decision to write the novel from Peter's point of view is inspired. (His) story is complex and moving (and) his voice is eloquent." (The Irish Times)

"Oliver Wyman portrays a resentful 15-year-old Peter van Pels, who lives in Amsterdam in 1942. This novel is another of those based on Anne Frank’s diary. En route to meeting the Frank family in their secret annex, Peter is determined to see his girlfriend one last time. Instead he views his girlfriend’s family being taken away by the Nazis. When his family joins the Franks in the annex, he lurks in the shadows, feeling powerless and frightened. Wyman’s voice measures the way Peter has been robbed of his sense of self. The rest of the full cast plays the other annex residents, their tones and voices contrasting vividly with Peter’s sense of darkness—especially Anne Frank’s. Peter’s longing and her optimism give credibility to the two teens, who are united by uncertainty and growing feelings of mutual attraction and frustrated by a lack of privacy. Later, the cast’s haunting voices give a fuller depiction of Peter’s guilt, remorse, and despair at Mauthausen concentration camp." (AudioFile Magazine) --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Heather VINE VOICE on 25 Oct. 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The premise of this novel is really interesting... It takes the historical figure Peter Van Pels who appears in The Diary of Anne Frank and re imagines Anne's story from his point of view and even continues the story beyond where Anne's diaries end, into Auschwitz. The author has attempted to maintain as much historical accuracy as is known about the annex and the families who stayed there in order to frame her imagining of Peter's story. For those who have read The Diary of Anne Frank this may be an interesting read but we must remember that it is fictional and Peter is not known to have kept any diaries so the novel cannot provide any further insight into the facts of Anne's life or those of the families she hid with in the annex.

For me, the major let down of this novel was the writing style and the 'voice' that Peter is given. It seems to rely too heavily on jaunty, basic dialogue and exchanges between 'characters' seem trivialised. I would love to have seen more of a development of Peter's thoughts- longer passages where the reader got to connect with him and have a greater insight into his thoughts and feelings while trapped in the annex. Despite the difficulty of the subject matter at hand I feel that the author's target audience could have handled a much more authentic engagement with the seriousness of the events of the time.

All in all an interesting idea but poorly executed and written at too basic a level for it's 'young adult' target audience.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By RM/TM TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 Aug. 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I loved the premise of this book - that someone sharing Anne Frank's 'Secret Annex' could provide an alternative viewpoint of the time spent in hiding - but the execution itself was a little disappointing for me. Whereas the 'real' diary is packed full of trivial, but compelling information (meals the families ate, gifts given on birthdays, gossip from outside), 'Annexed' focuses mainly on the very insular thoughts of teenage Peter van Pels, separated from his girlfriend, feeling lonely and awkward among the strong female characters. The author seems reluctant to provide the same day-to-day minutiae that were so fascinating in the original (possibly to avoid repetition) but equally seems to be wary of moving too far from Anne's version of events (out of respect for historical fact?). The book thus seems to be 'caught between two stools'. The end (recounting time spent in the concentration camp and on the march) is more successful - possibly because there are no detailed records of Peter's life after the Annex (that I'm aware of), thus allowing a little more poetic licence. There is also a moving section describing the various fates of all the other Annex occupants. In short, a very original idea, but not nearly as arresting as the real thing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Miss E. Potten on 23 April 2012
Format: Paperback
I didn't know quite what to expect from this novel. The Diary of a Young Girl is one of my favourite books of all time, so the idea of a novelisation of the same events was simultaneously exciting and just a little bit worrying. Happily - and to my great relief - I found that for the most part, Dogar's endeavour manages to walk the fine line between 'respectful tribute' and 'artistic license' quite successfully!

The book is written from the point of view of Peter van Pels, the teenage son of the family in hiding with the Franks. It begins with Peter watching his (entirely fictional) girlfriend Liese and her family being rounded up and driven away. He can only stand in the road in despair. He makes his way reluctantly to the warehouse to join the Frank family - and his first impressions don't exactly fill him with joy... But slowly he adapts to life in the annexe, finds a new strength he didn't know he had, and begins an odd flirtation with livewire Anne.

This romantic element seems to be the main issue for many of the novel's detractors, but actually I found it quite subtle and entirely plausible. In such a confined space, with hormones raging and very little to engage their attention elsewhere, I found it completely believable that precocious young Anne could set her sights on Peter - and that he might feel extremely conflicted about it, but also tempted by her quick wit and cheerful charm. I occasionally found Peter's narrative a little self-conscious and slow, even manipulative at times, and it didn't have all the little details about daily life that made Anne's journal really come alive, but I still enjoyed it!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By TheBookAddictedGirl on 7 Aug. 2011
Format: Hardcover
Everyone knows the story of Anne Frank, the girl forced into hiding during World War Two by the Nazis. But have you ever thought about what it was like for the others in the Annexe? Peter van Pels lived there, with the Franks and his parents. He hates it to begin with, hates everyone - Anne in particular. But then it all changes, and he falls in love with the girl who annoyed him most. How long can they stay hidden? And what happens to Peter afterwards, if they get found?
I remember reading Anne Frank's diary as a little girl, whilst doing WW2 at school. The true horror was sort of lost on me then, but when I picked it up again recently, I saw everything. The death, the pain, the world. And I also saw her life, her spirit, her essence. Annexed made it all feel so much more real. It was an incredible book: sad, beautiful, and horrible, it shows that love grows in the unlikeliest places and that to many bad situations, there can be something worse. I just sped through it, devouring it. My mind is still spinning.
Written in a diary-like form of memories, with the currently dying Peter in a concentration camp sick-bay chipping in now and then, revealing what he now sees as obvious, cherished, stupid. The writing was amazing, real, so full of life and hope and despair - so raw.
Peter was a wonderful character: so strong and smart. He may not have said a lot out loud, but inside he told all that was important. What really got through to me was how scared he was to hope, how terrified he was of being disappointed. He was scared that he'd die, without doing any of the things he wanted to do. And all because he was Jewish. All Peter longed for was no labels, to be seen simply as Peter, not a German, not a Jew, just Peter.
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