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Animal House [DVD]

43 customer reviews

Price: £2.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
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£2.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Actors: John Belushi, Karen Allen, Tom Hulce, Stephen Furst, Mark Metcalf
  • Directors: John Landis
  • Writers: Douglas Kenney, Chris Miller, Harold Ramis
  • Producers: Ivan Reitman, Matty Simmons
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: None
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Audio Description: None
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Universal
  • DVD Release Date: 26 Jan. 2004
  • Run Time: 104 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0000DCXS1
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 21,435 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

John Landis' raucous college comedy, set in the early Sixties, now has semi-cult status. Delta House is the fraternity that will take anyone no other club wants as a member and makes sure nothing comes in the way of their partying. The college dean (John Vernon) is desperate to close Delta House down and enlists the help of another fraternity full of sanctimonious, white, rich boys. However, Delta House's affiliates are equally determined to continue their partying and high-jinks: culminating in a showdown during the homecoming parade. John Belushi's film career took off after playing the toga-loving John 'Bulto' Bultarsky, and Donald Sutherland puts in an appearance as a free-thinking, pot-smoking professor.

From Amazon.co.uk

A groundbreaking screwball caper, 1978's National Lampoon's Animal House was in its own way a rite of passage for Hollywood. Set in 1962 at Faber College, it follows the riotous carryings-on of the Delta Fraternity, into which are initiated freshmen Tom Hulce and Stephen Furst. Among the established house members are Tim Matheson, Peter Riegert and the late John Belushi as Bluto, a belching, lecherous, Jack Daniels guzzling maniac. A debauched house of pranksters (culminating in the famous Deathmobile sequence), Delta stands as a fun alternative to the more strait-laced, crew-cut, unpleasantly repressive norm personified by Omega House. As cowriter the late Doug Kenney puts it, "better to be an animal than a vegetable".

Animal House is deliberately set in the pre-JFK assassination, pre-Vietnam era, something not made much of here, but which would have been implicitly understood by its American audience. The film was an enormous success, a rude, liberating catharsis for the latter-day frathousers who watched it. However, decades on, a lot of the humour seems broad, predictable, boorish, oafishly sexist and less witty than Airplane!, made two years later in the same anarchic spirit. Indeed, although it launched the Hollywood careers of several of its players and makers, including Kevin Bacon, director John Landis, Harold Ramis and Tom Hulce, who went on to do fine things, it might well have been inadvertently responsible for the infantilisation of much subsequent Hollywood comedy. Still, there's an undeniable energy that gusts throughout the film and Belushi, whether eating garbage or trying to reinvoke the spirit of America "After the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour" is a joy.

On the DVD: Animal House comes to disc in a good transfer, presented in 1.85:1. The main extra is a featurette in which director John Landis, writer Chris Miller and some of the actors talk about the making of the movie. Interestingly, 23 years on, most of those interviewed look better than they did back in 1978, especially Stephen "Flounder" Furst. --David Stubbs --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By The BlackFerret on 7 Dec. 2006
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Most films in National Lampoon's canon are interesting, funny in a fairly juvenile way, and you sometimes feel they are for Americans only.

This little devil, however, was amongst the first they made, and bucks all those later trends. You can easily watch it once a month, the humour is broad and black at the same time, and it's got such universal appeal, I've always wished I'd still been at Grammar school when it came out, so I could've tried a few tricks from the movie here. Unfortunately, I'd have been a peculiar retard to still be there aged 27!!

One good reason for its' success is the excellent weaseally performance of John Vernon as Dean Wormer. His crypto-Fascist efforts to squash Delta fraternities fun and excesses have remained ursurpassed, even by Alan Rickman as Sheriff of Nottingham in Prince of Thieves-talk about the pantomime villian incarnate.

But, of course, it helps to have a hero to match and finally outwit that villian. Luckily, it isn't an anaemic and tree-hugging one-it's the one and only John Belushi. There's probably no point in anyone else being on screen in every scene he's in-he just dominates events quite wonderfully.

I'll leave it there & not spoil the ending-let's just say the final battle between the WASP's and the anarachic Delta frat is something to behold, and beats Star Wars or Lord of the Rings hands down!
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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 Jan. 2005
Format: DVD
Just bought the new Animal House dvd. After all these years it's still a classic! Most people mention Belushi's performance but for me the underrated Tim Matheson as Otter steals the show. (Tim Matheson should've been a major star). However the big disappointment on this version is they've changed much of the music featured from the original film. No "Wonderful World", "Theme from a Summer Place", "Let's Dance" (from the foodfight scene). And what's worse they've replaced it with bland "modern" music and it's awful. This is the first time I've ever heard of this happening to film music. But at least they've kept Elmer Bernstein's classic original score. A superb film but one star deducted for the changes.
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35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 Jun. 2004
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Although the film is as good as it always was. This DVD has been ruined by the complete changing of some of the music in the film. I counted at least four songs that have been changed, including Money, and the Sam Cooke song Wonderful World.
I have given this DVD 2 stars not the film as the original was 5 stars.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mirko Mihaljevic on 16 May 2011
Format: DVD
The English version from 2001 (or feb. 4 2002) has the original music (Let's Dance in the foodfight scene).
It's in widescreen with black bars on top and bottom, and the picture is very dark. 104 min.
I prefer the new version even though 8 melodies (12 min. total) has been changed.
When a new version with the old music, fullscreen and more light arrives, I will buy it. But not before...
Maybe we could get a Directors Cut (120 min. +).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By ComedyGirl on 1 Jun. 2011
Format: DVD
Yes, they removed all the original, and classic, music from the film. When I looked it up on the internet - it happened for copyright reasons apparently.

Although the film is still great, the lack of hit music from that period really robs the movie of its charm. This was always a madcap comedy, but it is also a sweet and touching film. The characters are such great fun and it is still sad to see John Belushi at the height of his comedy powers when he was just making his big break.

A classic, that has been tragically mauled for the DVD release.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By M. Witcombe on 19 Feb. 2004
Format: DVD
Sorry about the title.
Animal house is a timeless classic, a comedy that draws on raw physical humour to form an empathetic band of beer-drinking, women-ogling outcasts in their pursuit of mindless anarchy. The film is a deft and clever parody of the American college system, an occassionally disgusting blueprint for teen movies to come. No Animal House, no American Pie. It's that simple.
Next to comedy classics of a similar vintage, like Airplane! or Blazing Saddles, Animal House can appear crude and simplistic, but that is the entire point of the film. The hilarious take on inspirational speeches by John Belushi ('Let's do it!'), the sparkling rendition of 'Jump' by Otis Day and the anarchic, gag-ridden finale combine in a glorious, technicolour celebration of 60s rebellion- and not a peace badge in sight.
Each character in the movie is a parody in itself, and the way they interact showcases extremes of college lifestyles brilliantly. The film has moments of obvious symbolism and mild racial undertones without being overtly political, and besides, it seems unfair to judge a comedy so dependent on accessibility from a philosophical standpoint. Whilst many teen comedies now seek to establish vague moral undertones (and often become saccharine in the process), Animal House continues to break the mould by being a no holds barred gross-out. If you want a no-brainer, outlandishly funny and parody-laden comedy, then Animal House is still the best on offer.
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Format: DVD
It's the undisputed heavyweight champ of frat-boy movies. Many erstwhile pretenders to the throne have come and gone (Porky's, Screwballs, Revenge of the Nerds to name but a few) but none of them have come close to matching this slice of genius from John Landis. Even today, many years after it first came out, Animal House still stands head and shoulders above the competition. Like its undoubted star - the late John Belushi, Animal House is loud, stupid, vulgar and more often than not: uproariously funny. As well as its influence on those who shamelessly copied the formula for their own efforts; the film's larger-than-life celebration of youthful excess also spawned a craze for drunken toga parties and food-fights in college campuses across America.
Set in the early 1960s at the fictional Faber College, the film deals with the story of the debauched Delta Fraternity: a collection of drunken headcases, misfits and screw-ups for whom higher education is just something that gets in the way of partying and screwing girls.
The plot itself is so simple a retarded five-year-old could follow it without much trouble. The big end of year parade is coming and the Dean doesn't want the Deltas to screw it up and embarrass him in front of the Mayor - so he sets out to get them thrown off campus by putting the Deltas on the mysterious `double-secret probation'.
To achieve his goal, Wormer enlists the help of the smarmy Omega fraternity. The Omegas are the antithesis of all that the fun lovin' Deltas cherish and hold dear to their drunken hearts. Headed by the sexually inadequate Greg Marmalard (`Shouldn't something be happening by now, Greg Honey?
Read more ›
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