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Angels of Albion: Women of the Indian Mutiny Hardcover – 16 Sep 1996


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 298 pages
  • Publisher: Viking; 1st edition, 1st impression edition (16 Sept. 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670846708
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670846702
  • Product Dimensions: 15.8 x 3 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 831,919 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Jane was born in Edinburgh and brought up in North Yorkshire. After reading English at Somerville College, Oxford, she became an antiquarian book dealer, and later a writer. Her eight books to date have been critically acclaimed, and have confirmed her as one of our most engaging and original social historians.

Jane lives near Oxford with her husband and - during university holidays - her two sons. She writes full time, apart from when she's happily travelling to give talks or broadcasts about her books, or working one day a week at Somerville College as an assistant archivist.

Learn more about her books, work in progress, and future speaking engagements on www.jane-robinson.com, where you can also send her a message.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Richard Bristol on 24 May 2010
Format: Paperback
This is a really excellent book and gave me the opportunity to read stories and sources that I would not usually have the chanceto read. The stories of the women and children caught up in the Indian Mutiny make you understand the hardships that normal people from Britain endured in the India of the East India Company. India is littered with their graves, and the letters and stories in this book makes them real people that you can relate to.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amy Foster on 10 Jan. 2009
Format: Paperback
I read this book by way of William Dalrymple's excellent book The Last Moghul and it has really enhanced my understanding of the situation. Wonderful to read it from the woman's point of view.
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3 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 6 Aug. 2008
Format: Paperback
The author is unfortunately rather detestable which somewhat marrs the rather interesting subject. One soon tires of her ramming phrases like "We'll shall see" at the end of every chapter and her passing of her opinion as if it were fact also soon begins to great. The book is written by someone who seems to mourn the passing of Empire and the "civilising" effect it had upon the natives and whilst the nature of the subject implies a certain view point it is a little unseemly for an alleged historian to so rabidly champion a view point. However there are some good points to this book, namely she allows the memsahibs to tell their story in their own words. There are large chucks of text which consist of letters written at the time or published later. There is an unfortunate absence of sources used from the Indian side and little attempt is made to find out what the Indians views on the memsahibs were. This book would have been a lot better had the author merely presented a selection of experts from the women caught up in the mutiny at the time and provided some biographical information. Unfortunately she tries to be a historian and fails horribly.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
The Great Mutiny from the Memsahibs' Perspective 3 July 2003
By Dennis J. Buckley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Robinson provides a unique analysis of the Great Mutiny from the perspective of the British women involved. Robinson conveys, in a manner that strictly military writers do not, the scope of the Mutiny and its "domestic" impact.
Only another woman could have written this book. Robinson combines sympathy with a certain level of judgment of the actions and opinions of some of the participants in a straightforward way. She is unencumbered by the Victorian deference to women and current fear of radical feminism.
The selection of photographs-- current and historical-- and old wood cuts that accompany the text reflect great care and excellent judgment.
In all, an important addition to the field of Mutiny scholarship related in a very human way.
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