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Andrew Marr's Megacities [DVD]


Price: £9.20 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Andrew Marr's Megacities [DVD] + Andrew Marr's History of the World  [DVD] + Empire [DVD]
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Product details

  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Exempt
  • Studio: Acorn Media
  • DVD Release Date: 22 Aug 2011
  • Run Time: 217 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004NPD14U
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 34,029 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Presenter Andrew Marr goes on a journey of discovery around the world to reveal the anatomy of some of the world’s most incredible cities and the people who make them work. We’ll meet both the engineers and technocrats who control our cities, and the ordinary people who must live with their decisions. Often, it’s the ordinary citizens who are the unsung heroes, finding ingenious ways to keep the megacity functioning.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Alice Buckner on 31 Aug 2011
I thoroughly enjoyed this series when it aired on BBC. I do tend to get Andrew Marr mixed up with Evan Davis (Dragon's Den) but I guess that is more my problem the his! Certainly Andrew Marr's energy and enthusiasm turned what was potentially a fairly dry series into one which was fascinating to watch as well as being very colourful and entertaining - although in the case of the Mexican sewer diving perhaps a bit too colourful eghhh! The series is packed full of information about the megacities of the world amd in particular London, Tokyo, Mexico City, Dhaka and Shanghai and also it is interspered with very human touches such as Andrew Marr working as rickshaw driver or being swamped by dance partners in Mexico.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By horoscopy on 30 Oct 2012
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I actually give this documentary 3.5 stars.,,but the reasons i deduct at least 1 1/2 stars is that I think this documentary should have included more cities such as Sao Paulo , Paris, Sydney , Bangkok,, New York, Moscow, Berlin, Mumbai (Bombay) ,etc. This documentary only covers about 5 "mega cities"...:Shanghai, Tokyo, Mexico City, Dhaka (Bangladesh), and London. There is very interesting things to see on each of the 5 mega cities shown in this documentary but seems to focus too much on only certain cities..example Mexico City and Tokyo..although these are interesting to see....It would have been much better if had spread the focus to include at least the top 10 or 15 major cities of the world.

Also I think that it seems a bit too "entertaining" at times.....such as the segment on kidnappers, gangs, bullet proof vests and defensive driving in Mexico City. It kind of goes off into tangents in several places in other cities reviews too and i think these might just would have been better time to show us other major cities of the world and how they are developing.

As a side opinion....with the exception of London, this documentary sure made me feel thankful that i do not live in ANY of these "mega cities"..as it shows life in them to be just plain awful.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Baby~ on 10 Aug 2013
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It's an amazing programme. The DVDs are very good. I was very enjoying watching this with my friends and family. The deliver spped was also very fast!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By victoria on 1 Sep 2012
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Super fast delivery. Thanks very much! Everything was as described. An insightful DVD about the impact of urbanisation throughout the world and the detrimental effects associated with an ever increasing world population.
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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Rowena Hoseason HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 29 Jun 2011
This is one of the BBC's flashy, globe-trotting documentary series, which fills three hour-long episodes with snappy segments filmed in five of the world's major cities.
In some ways, `Megacities' presents a nightmare scenario: it suggests that by the end of this century a scary 70% of the landmass of the planet could be covered in sprawling city-states. Andrew Marr uses this springboard to look more closely at some of the existing cities with populations over 10 million: London, Tokyo, Mexico City, Shanghai and Dhaka in Bangladesh. He meets the locals from all walks of life, and examines the infrastructure of the cities. Very often his conclusions do not reflect what you might expect: Marr suggests that life in the most well-ordered and established megacities may be safe but it can also be sterile, isolating and unfulfilling. By contrast, life in Mexico City (the most dangerous city shown) is portrayed as vibrant, engaging and social.

No doubt these films skim the surface of the subject and are guilty of presenting a non-representative snapshot of the situation. It's hard to believe that a slum-dweller who has to carry all drinking water by hand for 2km each day could possibly be `happier' than the recluse in Tokyo who never leaves his bedroom but has all mod cons brought to him. Likewise, a view of London as a quirky capital which allows roller-blading through the streets as a demonstration of social coherence is... facile.
However, some of the segments are truly interesting. The investigation into transport (and how it can enhance or degrade quality of life was enlightening. The effect of fast food on the Victorian sewer system in London was shocking.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By tallmanbaby TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 13 July 2011
Doing a TV documentary series about Megacities is a rather obvious idea, books like Endless City and The City Reader (Routledge Urban Reader) (Routledge Urban Reader Series) are fascinating and surprisingly topical. I would also suggest that Linguistics is long overdue a decent TV documentary.

The BBC have sent out Andrew Marr to go round the small number of Megacities, basically very very big cities, so not Coventry then. There is some attractive filming, though some of it does get overused. It was broadcast mid 2011 in three episodes.

Unfortunately rather than do a straight documentary, the BBC decided to add in a Michael Palin style travelogue element to the whole thing. I actually found Marr to be surprisingly likeable, behind the lives of these denizen of slums and the like, there was an element of heartwarming Dickensian-ism. In the most part, people were far more likeable than you would have imagined.

In terms of analysis it was all rather feeble, a few facts and figures, some nice filming, but references to London did feel tagged on, and all in all it said very little that was not obvious.

It was watchable enough, but it fell clearly between two stools, not quite a full on Palin-esque travelogue, nor decent analysis, I enjoyed the series, and if you have not seen it, it is worth a look, but this is no classic.

EDIT - I would recommend Urbanized [DVD] [2011] if you are interested in this topic, I think it is better.
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