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Andrei Rublev [DVD] [1973]

18 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Anatoliy Solonitsyn, Ivan Lapikov, Nikolay Grinko, Nikolay Sergeev, Irina Tarkovskaya
  • Directors: Andrei Tarkovsky
  • Writers: Andrei Tarkovsky, Andrey Konchalovskiy
  • Producers: Tamara Ogorodnikova
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: Italian, Russian, Tatar
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Artificial Eye
  • DVD Release Date: 21 Jan. 2002
  • Run Time: 185 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005UCZI
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 44,114 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Andrei Tarkovsky's acclaimed epic about the life of 15th century icon painter Andrei Rublev. Rublev (Anatoli Solonitsyn) lives in a world consumed by feudal violence and human degradation, and the turmoil he sees all about him makes him lose the will to speak. After many years of silent travelling around medieval Russia, he meets a young boy who has taken charge of the construction of a large silver bell, and in him discovers the inspiration to speak again.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Richard Bowden on 6 Nov. 2007
Format: DVD
If picture quality is your main concern, then this is the edition for you, as the image is splendid, a restored version the sharpness of which adds considerably to the majesty and impact of Tarkovsky's masterpiece. Purchasers ought to be aware however that the director's Soviet masters took exception to the sex and violence in the director's original and this, a cut down version, is the result. For this edition originally the BBFC have also very kindly lopped out a few more seconds - because of a horse falling down some stairs (though I have heard it may have been accidently reinserted for the DVD release). It's still a great film, of course, but I'd argue it ultimately lacks a dimension originally intended, in the process making the film much more static and contemplative than the director conceived. The 'red cover' version, also on sale here on Amazon I see, offers 15 mins more, albeit with a picture which is less impressive.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Master Jacques on 2 April 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Five stars for one of the greatest films ever made - other reviewers have put it so well that there's no point in repeating their comments.

No point either in repeating the comments about the differing lengths of different editions - the choice lies between the longer edition on the American Criterion issue (205 mins) and the Ruscico/Artificial Eye cut which is about fifteen minutes shorter - although approved (and possibly preferred) by Tarkovsky himself.

However, at time of writing (2nd April 2012) there is a need to be sure what you are getting. I ordered the 2002 Artificial Eye Edition as shown above, fulfilled by Amazon from "FilmloverUk"; but what I received was a 2-DVD thinpak edition with a different cover, extracted from the 2011 barebones set The Andrei Tarkovsky Collection [DVD] [1962]. This has a rather unimpressive film tribute to Tarkovsky on the second DVD, but none of the much more valuable extras advertised with the 2002 edition. It is also about ten minutes SHORTER than Artificial Eye's own 2002 edition, in order to fit it onto one disc.

So... the film itself is the same Ruscico remastering on both sets, but truncated. And until Amazon make it clear that there are two different AE versions of "Andrei Rublev", please check what you are ordering - the 2002 or 2011 Artificial Eye edition. It does make a huge difference!
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70 of 73 people found the following review helpful By L. Davidson VINE VOICE on 6 Mar. 2006
Format: DVD
Like all of Tarkovsky's films, "Andrei Rublev" stays with the viewer long after it ends and it fully warrants repeat viewings. The film is a semi-biographical account of the life of the mediaeval Russian icon painter Andrei Rublev. It is filmed as a series of discrete episodes, most of which see Rublev as merely a spectator to various events, rather than the central focus of the viewer's attention. Each episode provides the viewer with a deep insight into the life and politics of Russia in the early 15th Century, which were heavily influenced by the monastic, religious vision of life ,coexisting uneasily alongside extreme barbarity, personified by the Tartar hordes. However "Andrei Rublev" is much more than just a Russian historical epic. Each scene is sculpted exquisitely by Tarkovsky creating a haunting ,melancholy ,yet uplifting film that is a work of art of supreme quality. The sack of Vladimir and the Bell Casting scenes are particularly memorable and the cinematography throughout "Andrei Rublev" is exceptional. The film is ultimately a tribute to the indefatigability of the human spirit, battered and bruised by acts of brutality, cruelty and injustice throughout life's journey , but capable of sublime acts of creation, love and forgiveness which transcend the baseness of the material world and the inevitabilty and omnipresence of sin.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Film Buff on 12 Sept. 2014
Format: DVD
With Andrei Roublev Andrei Tarkovsky and fellow screenwriter Andrei Konchalovsky couldn't have picked a more ambitious subject. Though little known in the West, the 15th century Russian iconographer is considered in Russia as emblematic not only of artistic creativity at the highest level, but of the very creation of Russia itself as a united country. The story of the production of this film is a fascinating but complex one. I recommend reading Johnson and Petrie's outstanding survey The Films of Andrei Tarkovsky: A Visual Fugue to get a full account of it. The authorities originally okayed a script which consisted of 2 parts with 12 episodes and 2 prologues. Lack of money and other production problems led to the film being reduced to 2 parts, 8 episodes, a prologue and an epilogue. The cuts made shifted the tone away from a Socialist Realist perspective (gone is the planned opening depiction of the Kulikovo Field battle which would have shown a 'Russian' leader in a positive heroic light) towards an inner deeply religious meditation on the nature of art and the permanent link between religion and culture. Communism and Christianity are of course anathema to each other and the post-Krushchev administration attempted to suppress the film completely when they realized its full nature. It was only due to foreign pressure (particularly from the Cannes Film Festival which awarded the film the International Critics Prize in 1969) that the film was released inside Russia and people could at last see what all the fuss was about.

The struggle to get Andrei Roublev released led many western critics to interpret Tarkovsky's extraordinary depiction of an artist struggling to find a voice in Medieval times as an allegory on the director's own struggles with the Communist regime.
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