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...And Then We Saw Land
 
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...And Then We Saw Land

1 Mar. 2010 | Format: MP3

£6.59 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Mar. 2010
  • Label: [PIAS] Recordings Catalogue
  • Copyright: 2010 Full time hobby
  • Total Length: 47:23
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0037LQ1SY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 47,672 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mike Mantin on 2 Mar. 2010
Format: Audio CD
Tunng's fourth album sees them operating as a full five-piece band rather than simply the personal project of Mike Lindsay and the now-departed Sam Genders Thinking cynically, this could be an attempt to finally shake off the `folktronica' tag, a tiresome label which presumably gets as much welcome as a one-star review to the bands lumped with it. But of course, that's not the case (though it might be a nice side-effect): this is a natural evolution, and it's yielded some joyous results.

`...And Then We Saw Land' is by far Tunng's most accessible work yet, its bigger scope allowing Lindsay's ear for melody to take centre stage. In `Hustle' they have their first radio-friendly hit, a cute shuffle flavoured with banjos and African-flavoured percussion (they've clearly been taking some notes since touring with members Tinariwen last year). Elsewhere they take their trademarks of delicate fingerpicked guitar and nature imagery and apply them to their most memorable tunes yet.

But this is by no means a reluctant bid for commercial appeal. It is a shame to see a curtail of the liberal use of samples and electronics which made their earlier albums so distinctive - the bleepy refrains which make up the second half of the album will be greeted warmly by their fans - but the songwriting is stronger than ever and the fact the band has been fleshed out never compromises the songs' intimacy. There's none of the grating filler that 2007's `Good Arrows' suffered. "Don't look down or back" sings the 15-person `Mega Chorus' of mates on the epic track of the same name. It's a philosophy that the confident and fully-formed Tunng of this fine fourth album clearly shares.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Simon on 18 Mar. 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Earlier albums featured moments of song writing genius linked by pleasant musical meanderings. These were as if they had set out to complete a song or two but the sun was shining and they were smiling, so the songs remained unfinished but delightful. This album is a more cohesive set of individual songs yet it is no less Tunng. Whether or not any of the individual songs matches your favourites from the past is a matter of personal taste but the overall quality is far more consistent.

They are often described as Folk but there is no Celtic nostalgia here, no melodies reverse engineered across the pond through modal tuning, no longing for the mines, no working hardship, pirates, poachers, highwaymen or lords and ladies dancing. If this references the past it is the whimsical innocence of Barrett's Floyd or the lyrical brilliance of Ray Davies at his peak. Their work speaks not to the England that would break us but to the England in our hearts, or perhaps the one just a step or two beyond the looking glass.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By N. Kirkby on 21 April 2010
Format: Audio CD
Tunng's fourth album felt long overdue. I've been following the band since Comments of the Inner Chorus was released, and loved it all.

There is some very different stuff here from This is Tunng - Mother's Daughter and Other Songs and Comments. This feels like a continuation of some of the trajectories in Good Arrows. I like it a lot, although it doesn't appeal to me quite as much as the earlier stuff.

But then, if they stayed in the same groove with each new record then it would get boring wouldn't it?
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Format: Audio CD
Well first, I've read the other reviews and don't particularly disagree with any - both those that like it and the one that doesn't. That could sound silly in a review of most bands, but maybe fitting for a Tunng album. All those new ingredients are there and most are as good as claimed. I like the opening acoustic guitar opening, and the heavy guitar solo and general power of "don't look down or back", the extra colours of the tonal palette and increased dynamic range compared to earlier albums. With a few exceptions ("santiago" is just a bit irritating), it all works well, there's lots of good bits. So what's missing? Why doesn't it hold my attention over time? Where's the bigger resonance of the ideas of the earlier albums? Oh yes, the songs aren't as good. It's all a bit more ordinary. Or accessible, if you like. The claim is that it's more like the live band, and this may be true - I've seen them a few times, and they've not come across that well. OK, sometimes that was problems with the sound, and they really need the right venue, festival stages just fail them. And like the live shows, I really want to like this, and kind of do. It's ok. But come on, this is Tunng, they have been AWESOME. This is, well, a little bit awesome and a little bit bland. Guess I better check out what Sam Genders is up to...
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By Jago Wells VINE VOICE on 15 Mar. 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I'll certainly go along with the four star ratings offered by the other reviewers. This is once again,an excellent offering from those new age minstrels from London Town.
For someone who hasn't heard Tunng before then this is probably their most instantly accessible work. The experimental electronic jiggery pokery is less evident and several of the tracks have-dare I say it- a poppy vibe! As someone else has mentioned, Tunng female vocalist Becky Jacobs is much more to the fore than previously. The album has a lovely flow which fits in with its nautical feel. Each track melding effortlessly into the next.The sound quality is to my ear,really fresh and sharp. The instruments and vocals clearly defined in their own spheres. Tunng go back to basics with some of the tracks drawn from their folk roots. Not surprisingly,there is a sea shanty-esque sound coming through as both instruments and lyrics suggest that they have consciously set out to create a seafaring concept album of sorts.
A great live band and a great studio outfit to boot!
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