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Analytical Chemistry Paperback – 11 Dec 2003


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Product details

  • Paperback: 360 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (11 Dec. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0198502893
  • ISBN-13: 978-0198502890
  • Product Dimensions: 24.4 x 2.5 x 18.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 555,165 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

It is essential that students have access to good textbooks, which give enough information to be useful to the specialist but do not overwhelm those begining in the subject. Higson had gone a long way towards providing such a book, which I am certain will be used widely in teaching analytical chemistry. (Education in Chemistry 2004.)

There is a simple design with well laid out text and uncomplicated diagrams. I particularly like the diagrams as they are very clear and would be easy for students to reproduce. The author has eradicated mathematics wherever possible, which will be popular with undergraduates. (Chemistry World)

About the Author

Lecturer in Analytical Chemistry, Manchester Metropolitan University, 1993-1996 Lecturer in Biomedical Materials Science, UMIST, 1996-2000 Senior Lecturer in Biomedical Materials Science, UMIST 2000-2002 Professor of Bio and Electroanalytical Science, Cranfield University, 2002-

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
We might not realize it, but many of us unwittingly carry out analytical chemistry on a daily basis. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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my daughter wanted this book for her Uni studies & worked through it during the summer, it seems to have been a great help in getting her good grades & she swears it made the difference between a pass or a fail, so I'm delighted.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By omatseyin kenneth on 9 Jan. 2013
Format: Paperback
as advertised the book was new and arrived even before the time proposed, the packaging was very good. simply wonderful
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Amazon.com: 1 review
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Errors in Chapter 5 30 Sept. 2012
By Athula Attygalle - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Chapter 5

5.3 "Energy is imparted to the atoms or molecules, causing the excitation of valence electrons"
Well valence electrons are those that participate in the formation of chemical bonds with other atoms. Energy is absorbed sometimes by excitation of non-bonded lone electrons. In ions sometimes d electrons are excite to empty d levels (that how copper ions get color). So Higson's statement is not universally valid.

5.3 "It follows that objects that are irradiated with light will often adsorb radiation and so be heated and we all know, for example, that objects placed in sunlight are warmed.

This could well be a typo. Adsorption is a surface phenomenon. Unless light acts as a particle (it does sometimes but not practical spectroscopy) it does not get adsorbed.

5.5 "The Beer¡VLambert law is sometimes expressed in terms of transmittance, T, where T = 1/A."

This is totally wrong. According to this so-called "Higson's Equation," Transmittance and Absorbance are indirectly but linearly related. According to "Higson's Equation," when T = 0.1, the Absorbance should be 10. The correct relationships on the hand are
T = 10-A (ten to the power minus A)
log10T = -A
A = -log10T
So, when T = 0.1, the Absorbance is 1.

5.5 "E is most commonly described in terms of mol dm-3 cm-1 in which case, l, the path length must be quoted in terms of cm."
This is incorrect. A= E bC

If C is given as mol dm-3 , and b in cm, then E should be mol-1 dm3 cm.

5.5 "Some reference books, however, will quote E values in terms of mol dm-3 cm-1 in which case the path length, l, must also be quoted in terms of, m."
Well no reliable textbook would quote this in this way. It should be mol dm-3 cm-1 . : quoted in terms of, m" this could be a typo; it should read cm.

5.5 "It should be noted, however, that the absorption of light is highly wavelength specific"
It is not highly specific. UV and visible absorption peaks are very broad that means compounds absorb a light of a rage of wavelengths. Lmax shows the peak absorption.

5.5 "If the compound is coloured then there will be at least one and even a number of differing wavelengths which show maximal aborbances."

Better to say, "a compound is coloured then there will be at least one and even a number of differing wavelengths which show maximal aborbances in the visible region"

5.10.4 L-max values are frequently in the order of 10000 mol dm-3 cm-1 or more, which makes them both highly coloured and easy to quantify even at very low concentrations."
If the Lmax lies in the UV region, the compound will be colorless no matter how large the magnitude of is Emax is.
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