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An Illustrated History of Greater Harrisburg: Life by the Moving Road Hardcover – Aug 1998


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Hardcover, Aug 1998
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Product details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Amer Historical Pr (Aug. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0965475441
  • ISBN-13: 978-0965475440
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 22.2 x 29.8 cm

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Amazon.com: 2 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Excellent Photographic and Narrative of Harrisburg History 15 Dec. 2009
By LEON L CZIKOWSKY - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book is an excellently researched and written book on many specifics of Harrisburg history. It presents a terrific photographic travel through the lives of generations of Harrisburg area residents. Readers learn how John Harris traded with Native Americans. In 1722, according to legend, he refused to trade rum to Native Americans he deduced were already drunk. This refusal angered them, so they tied John Harris to a tree and announced their intention to burn him. Hercules, a slave of John Harris, ran to friendly Paxton Native Americans for help. The Paxtons arrived before the fire was applied to Harris and Harris was saved. Harris then freed Hercules. It is unknown how much if this actually happened, yet several versions of this event were passed down.

Numerous interesting facts are presented. For instance, readers learn the Pennsylvania State Lunatic Hospital opened in 1851. Causes for admission included "novel reading" and "politics". Opium was a commonly prescribed medication.

In 1904, Harrisburg had 450 streets lights and 180 schools, 19 newspapers (daily and weekly), and 100 passenger trains stopping daily.

In 1928, Harrisburg had 33 schools, 13 theaters, 22 hotels, 3 major newspapers, and 142 passenger trains stopping daily.

Harrisburg had a "City Beautiful" movement that attempted to attract more single family homes rather than row homes that later became known as the "City Practical" movement.
A look into Harrisburg history 8 Dec. 2014
By Leon Czikowsky - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book is an excellently researched and written book on many specifics of Harrisburg history. It presents a terrific photographic travel through the lives of generations of Harrisburg area residents. Readers learn how John Harris traded with Native Americans. In 1722, according to legend, he refused to trade rum to Native Americans he deduced were already drunk. This refusal angered them, so they tied John Harris to a tree and announced their intention to burn him. Hercules, a slave of John Harris, ran to friendly Paxton Native Americans for help. The Paxtons arrived before the fire was applied to Harris and Harris was saved. Harris then freed Hercules. It is unknown how much if this actually happened, yet several versions of this event were passed down.

Numerous interesting facts are presented. For instance, readers learn the Pennsylvania State Lunatic Hospital opened in 1851. Causes for admission included "novel reading" and "politics". Opium was a commonly prescribed medication.

In 1904, Harrisburg had 450 streets lights and 180 schools, 19 newspapers (daily and weekly), and 100 passenger trains stopping daily.

In 1928, Harrisburg had 33 schools, 13 theaters, 22 hotels, 3 major newspapers, and 142 passenger trains stopping daily.

Harrisburg had a "City Beautiful" movement that attempted to attract more single family homes rather than row homes that later became known as the "City Practical" movement.
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