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An Audience for Einstein Paperback – 31 Jan 2005


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Product details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Mundania Press LLC (31 Jan. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594260966
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594260964
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 792,459 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

A well-written, at times riveting story. Wakely is clearly an excellent and concise writer. Great bedtime reading material. -- Ellen Feig, Skuawk Literature Reviews

In this science fiction thriller, Wakely presents rich character analysis in a theory of our not-so-distant future. -Will Petty -- West Suburban Living Magazine

Intelligent, moving.

Flowers For Algernon was good, but An Audience For Einstein is better.

What's next? Movie?

Bravo Mr. Wakely. -- penguincomics. net (Tim Lasiuta)

This was so much more than anticipated. Full of emotions and twists, you will not want this book to end. -- GetBookReviews.com

Thought provoking and entertaining. -- Genrefluent.com (Diana Tixier Herald)

From the Publisher

An Audience for Einstein is the winner of the Fountainhead Productions 2002/03 National Writing Contest and the 2003 Authorlink New Author Award for Science Fiction.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By TeensReadToo TOP 500 REVIEWER on 27 Nov. 2006
Format: Paperback
Young Percival Marlowe was a typical science geek; elderly Professor Marlowe is a Pulitzer Prize-winning astrophysicist who needs more time to complete all of the brilliant projects he has yet to share with the world. Unable to find a way to retrieve his own youth, Marlowe backs the project of neurosurgeon Carl Dorning, hoping but never truly believing that Dorning's revolutionary technique of transplanting memories will prove successful by the time Marlowe's rapidly-approaching death arrives.

Dorning knows that he only has one shot at transplanting Marlowe's essence, and realizes that the Professor doesn't have much time. When he meets a young homeless boy, Miguel Sanchez, all of the pieces begin to fall into place. But, when Marlowe finally realizes that this procedure may actually happen, he begins to question the moral implications of Dorning's potential success: "You've wrestled with the procedures and won, but not with the long term consequences, Dorning. Don't you see? If you're successful, you might have found a unique way to create a new class of slaves" (p. 42).

Mark Wakely's first novel tackles some big issues, forcing the reader to weigh the value of the life of a genius of science against that of an illiterate street urchin. Is the potential value of continuing a life already proven invaluable to mankind worth the sacrifice of one homeless boy who doesn't even know his own age? Or is the unique spirit Miguel brings to humanity more important than all of the equations and theories a second life for Professor Marlowe could offer?

2006 EPPIE Award

2003 Authorlink New Author Award for Science Fiction

2002/03 Fountainhead Productions National Writing Contest Winner

2003 Writemovies.com International Writing Competition, Finalist

Reviewed by: Mechele R. Dillard
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Detra Fitch TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 Jun. 2005
Format: Paperback
Professor Percival Marlowe is an elderly astrophysicist. The former Nobel Prize winner is one of the most brilliant scientific people of our century. He is at the brink of completing his greatest research. However, due to his rapidly declining health there is not enough time to finish it before he dies.
Doctor Carl Dorning was a highly regarded neurosurgeon who had a brain storm during an operation. He resigned from his work in order to turn his time toward proving his idea. For almost twenty years Carl secretly works in his basement lab on transferring one person's memories into another person's mind. Carl finally convinces Percival, the man he respects above all others, to fund the experiments.
Miguel Sanchez is a homeless, pre-teen boy. His mother is recovering in a medical facility. He has no idea where his cruel father currently is. So Miguel lives on the street with a few older kids, begging cash from passing traffic. Carl convinces Miguel to live with Percival for awhile and keep the fading professor company during his last days. In return, Miguel will have a roof over his head, three meals a day, and then receive "the gift of truly superior intelligence".
Percival and Miguel believes Carl's experimental surgery would transfer Percival's memories into Miguel's brain. Then Miguel would either instantly gain Percival's intelligence or occasionally get flashes of the elderly man's memories. Either way, someone would always remember Percival. Carl did not bother to inform either of them that only one set of memories could exist in the boy's head.
As the memories and essence of an astrophysicist comes forth, all that is the boy will be lost forever. The result is a tug-of-war for ownership of an eleven-year-old's body.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steven Mendel on 28 Aug. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
this book was really great. i dont want to spoil it for anyone but i have to say that i loved the mix of science fiction and morality. it really makes you think.
buy it!!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 72 reviews
151 of 153 people found the following review helpful
Interesting 23 Jun. 2005
By Detra Fitch - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Professor Percival Marlowe is an elderly astrophysicist. The former Nobel Prize winner is one of the most brilliant scientific people of our century. He is at the brink of completing his greatest research. However, due to his rapidly declining health there is not enough time to finish it before he dies.
Doctor Carl Dorning was a highly regarded neurosurgeon who had a brain storm during an operation. He resigned from his work in order to turn his time toward proving his idea. For almost twenty years Carl secretly works in his basement lab on transferring one person's memories into another person's mind. Carl finally convinces Percival, the man he respects above all others, to fund the experiments.
Miguel Sanchez is a homeless, pre-teen boy. His mother is recovering in a medical facility. He has no idea where his cruel father currently is. So Miguel lives on the street with a few older kids, begging cash from passing traffic. Carl convinces Miguel to live with Percival for awhile and keep the fading professor company during his last days. In return, Miguel will have a roof over his head, three meals a day, and then receive "the gift of truly superior intelligence".
Percival and Miguel believes Carl's experimental surgery would transfer Percival's memories into Miguel's brain. Then Miguel would either instantly gain Percival's intelligence or occasionally get flashes of the elderly man's memories. Either way, someone would always remember Percival. Carl did not bother to inform either of them that only one set of memories could exist in the boy's head.
As the memories and essence of an astrophysicist comes forth, all that is the boy will be lost forever. The result is a tug-of-war for ownership of an eleven-year-old's body.
**** A scary look at the world of science when an intelligent doctor's morals become twisted. The wish for immortality can be all consuming. Even when one knows that it is morally wrong to take without asking, especially in this manner, the temptation can still be great. Readers get a glimpse into how even the most brilliant minds alive can fear death, try to cheat it, and (hopefully) learn to let go. Do not begin this book believing that you can guess the outcome. This is a very good sci-fi that will leave you in deep thoughts long after you finish reading. ****
Reviewed by Detra Fitch of Huntress Reviews.
121 of 123 people found the following review helpful
An Audience for Einstein 24 Jun. 2005
By Charlene Austin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
"He was not ready, not ready, not ready."

Neurosurgeon Carl Dorning gave up his lucrative practice and devoted his life to one thing, one dream. His experiment, his work was everything. Now a panicked phone call from Professor Percival Marlowe's housekeeper, Natalie, threatens to destroy it all. He's just not ready, until... an accident gives Dorning the perfect subject, Miguel Sanchez. His mother is in a drug rehab. His father is an abusive drunk who will just think his son is hiding from him again. Carl will be doing the boy a favor. After all, he is offering him one of the most brilliant minds in history, and all that goes with it.

Despite the vast amounts of money he has invested in Dr. Carl Dorning's experiments, Nobel prize winning Professor Percival Marlowe doesn't really believe Dorning can pull off his promise of a new extended life. Still, there is that one small chance, the offer of hope. Doesn't he owe it to the world to continue his work, to continue to share what his brilliance can develop and bring to it. Besides, young Miguel is a pleasant and entertaining relief from the pain and knowledge of his rapidly approaching end.

But it does work.

But at what cost?

Mark Wakely's talents and imagination combine nicely with his background and "interest in all things scientific" in "An Audience for Einstein." The story is well crafted and fast paced. Wakely's characters are rich with human desires, fears, problems, foibles, and reality, and he teases and tempts them and the reader with possibilities, then taunts with doubts and questions. I was tugged into the in-depth self-examination and insight, and moral and ethical issues that haunt scientific endeavors-or should- while Wakely's story crafting skills kept me engrossed in the tale.

Well written, well told, and well worth the read. "An Audience for Einstein." is a bookshelf keeper.
30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
Has an emotional impact 23 Mar. 2005
By Jenny from Miami - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
While I basically agree with the first review, one thing it did not mention is that this novel is emotionally charged. The last two chapters in particular really stir your feelings, and throughout the book there are moments that pull on your heart strings. It might be a cliche, but I was sorry when it came to an end. I'm not a big science fiction reader, but this book kept me reading because I wanted everything to be all right for both the professor and the young boy. The ending is something of a tearjerker because of what ultimately happens (I guess it was inevitable) but still you can't help but be affected. I would read more from this author.
26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
A Wonderful Book! 13 July 2005
By Linda Yung - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Every now and then, you read a book by a new author that not only engages your mind, but your heart as well.

An Audience for Einstein is just such a book- and what a wonderful book it is.

I actually read it twice to make sure I hadn't missed anything the first time through- the plot twists and turns are just so clever. It's one of those rare novels you find yourself thinking about and reacting to for days afterwards- to me, that's not just good fiction, that's great fiction. And because I cared about these characters, I was drawn in emotionally, which is an investment I expect to make. No matter how "thoughful" a book is (and don't get me wrong- this book really makes you think!) if a novel doesn't stir and involve my feelings as well as my intellect, it's like I wasted my time.

This was time very well spent indeed.

An Audience for Einstein should be a "must-read" on everyone's list.
25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
A clever story 29 Mar. 2005
By Laura C. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This was such a clever book. The back-and-forth personality switch between the old professor and Miguel "made" the book for me; I really enjoyed how and when it happened. There's also a lot of soul-searching here, mainly on the part of the professor, who ends up a better person for it at the end. And yes it "reads" like a movie, although if they ever do make it a movie, they would need a phenomenal young actor to play the part of Miguel. The ending was somewhat sad, but hopeful too; the professor didn't seem to have much choice what else to do once he realized things had gone too far. And I was really caught by surprise at how the memory transfer actually occurred; it shocked me as much as it shocked the professor. Overall, a very worthwhile book that I would recommend, whether you like science fiction or not.
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