An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£15.99
  • RRP: £18.99
  • You Save: £3.00 (16%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Trade in your item
Get a £6.25
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth Hardcover – Unabridged, 29 Oct 2013


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Unabridged
"Please retry"
£15.99
£11.32 £4.00

Frequently Bought Together

An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth + You Are Here: Around the World in 92 Minutes + Postcards from Space: The Chris Hadfield Story
Price For All Three: £32.62

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £6.25
Trade in An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £6.25, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan; Unabridged edition (29 Oct 2013)
  • Language: Unknown
  • ISBN-10: 1447257103
  • ISBN-13: 978-1447257103
  • Product Dimensions: 15.8 x 2.8 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (220 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 111 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'Houston, we have a superstar' Washington Post 'Hadfield has done more than probably any astronaut since the Apollo missions to transform the image of space exploration ... Space has rarely seemed to close, or the world so astonishing' Daily Telegraph

From the Back Cover

'Space has rarely seemed so close, or the world so astonishing' Daily Telegraph

Chris Hadfield spent decades training as an astronaut and has logged nearly 4,000 hours in space. During this time he has broken into a Space Station with a Swiss army knife, disposed of a live snake while piloting a plane and been temporarily blinded while clinging to the exterior of an orbiting spacecraft. The secret to his success - and survival - is an unconventional philosophy he learned at NASA: prepare for the worst - and enjoy every moment of it.

You might never get to pilot a spacecraft like Colonel Hadfield, but his refreshing, hard-won wisdom will teach you how to think like an astronaut, and will change the way you view life on Earth - especially your own.

'An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth is the book Chris Hadfield was destined to produce . . . [It] makes the case for human space exploration in the post-Apollo, post-Shuttle age' Sunday Times

'He's the kind of astronaut who'd be great to grab a beer with' National Post

'Chris Hadfield prove[s] humour and humanity can reach Earth from space' Toronto Globe and Mail

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

66 of 67 people found the following review helpful By John Saltford on 21 Nov 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a book about ambition. But not the sort of ambition we usually hear or read about - the climb over everyone else ambition of politics and is found in many organisations or the 'I want it so much' ambition of X factor. It is about the 'I've got to work hard' ambition.
Chris Hadfield wanted to go into space. But he knew things might not work out and he was not going to define his success in life by whether he got there. As he said (not an exact quote) he wasn't going to define his life by something that may happen once in 10 years, but by doing 10 good things every day. He valued working with people and not over them. He was happy to do seemingly menial tasks if it helped the greater goal of the team. He would be pleased for other people's success. And all the time he would go the extra mile to achieve success for himself (that's hours of hard work) - to be the best at whatever he did. He would work hard. Very hard. And when he got there he would give back.
But if you think this may be an 'Aren't I wonderful?' type book you'd be wrong. Although the book is about him, it certainly isn't an ego trip.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Jason Mills VINE VOICE on 21 July 2014
Format: Hardcover
The title is not merely a lure into rocket anecdotes or a nod to Douglas Adams, though it's surely both of those. Hadfield does provide some solid life lessons, based not on a guru's revelations or the latest semi-scientific fad, but on decades of hard work and experience. For a book centred on space, it's surprisingly down to Earth.

Hadfield tells us about his life, from childhood through college, and his years as a fighter- and test-pilot. After that come his years with NASA. This period includes three trips into space, but Hadfield is at pains to show how small a portion of time that is, and how extensive the training and preparation. From an early age he directed his life towards being an astronaut, whilst ensuring that he enjoyed everything he did even if the long shot never came: well aware of the role of luck, he nonetheless did everything he could to weight the dice his way.

His message might be encapsulated in the notion that a strong work ethic and constant learning are their own reward. Chapter titles such as "Sweat The Small Stuff", "What's The Next Thing That Could Kill Me?" and "Aim To Be A Zero" emphasise his insistence on taming one's ego and getting the job done, whether in a Space Shuttle or the family swimming pool.

But this is not a dry and didactic book: the space anecdotes are there a-plenty, from how to deal with something in your eye on a spacewalk, to what to do when there's a snake in the cockpit. Hadfield's suggestions arise naturally from his experience and are suffused with goodwill and good humour. I came away more impressed than ever with what it means to be an astronaut, and able to see how a little of that in everyone's life would do us all good.

The book includes a few pages of photos, acknowledgements, a good index, and a splendid opening sentence:

"The windows of a spaceship casually frame miracles."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Duncan Brodie on 7 Jan 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a really fantastic book with tons of insights into what it takes to achieve success. I loved the style of writing. Information about specific missions was nicely balanced with lessons about teamwork, attitude, dealing with problems, challenges and change.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Richard Wright on 19 Aug 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Like most people I became aware of the author during his most recent stint aboard the International Space Station as its commander. It's been a long time since anybody has made space exploration as relevant and fascinating as Hadfield has, and it was for more of the same that I checked out his book. That component is definitely there, and as compelling as you'd expect, but what I hadn't cottoned on to was that this is also something of a how-to manual. Not how to be an astronaut so much as how to make the most of the opportunities and wants that are specific to your own life. It's not preachy, but it's enthusiastic. Hadfield talks about the many hurdles he had to cross in order to get where he did in an autobiographical way, but the detail on the qualities and attitudes he believes to have assisted him and others in his trade makes this a little more than just that. Such a book runs the risk of being preachy, but Hadfield is engaging throughout and his perspective is both practical and relatable. There's nothing New Age about his understanding of what makes success possible, and a lot of his observations are striking in how they differ from what else you might find on the shelf (several, including his insistence that it's sometimes best to 'be a zero' instead of excelling from the start, will stick with me). Overall, a pleasant surprise.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Phil Aldis on 9 Jan 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A present for my daughter who is a Chris Hadfield fan and was delighted to read the book. She insisted on sharing her favourite bits and read it cover to cover in a short time. It was then snapped up and read by a second daughter who enjoyed it equally.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Calum on 30 Dec 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was disappointed when this book ended. Aside from giving a real insight into the space program from the left seat of the Soyuz, it serves to pass on real wisdom and philosophy.
It carries good pace throughout. While the first part seems to verge upon Hadfield merely boasting of how wise and well-informed he has been through life, parts two and three make you feel guilty for even starting to suspect him of this.
We could learn much from this, I wanted to read more.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback