Amour 2012

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(93) IMDb 7.8/10
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Focusing on the lives of an elderly couple and the strain their relationship undergoes after one of them suffers a mild stroke, AMOUR is one of the most powerfully moving, emotionally devastating pieces of cinema ever made. From one of, if not the greatest director working today â MICHAEL HANEKE. Winner of the 2012 Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

Starring:
William Shimell, Isabelle Huppert
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_12_and_over
Runtime 2 hours 7 minutes
Starring William Shimell, Isabelle Huppert, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Emmanuelle Riva
Director Michael Haneke
Genres Drama
Rental release 18 March 2013
Main languages French
Subtitles English
Original title love
Discs
  • Feature ages_12_and_over
Runtime 2 hours 7 minutes
Starring William Shimell, Isabelle Huppert, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Emmanuelle Riva
Director Michael Haneke
Genres Drama
Rental release 18 March 2013
Main languages French
Subtitles English
Original title love

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 39 people found the following review helpful By schumann_bg TOP 100 REVIEWER on 28 Jan 2013
Format: DVD
As others have said, this is a very moving film, and takes us into an area I haven't seen focused on like this in any other film. I had feared it would be too harrowing to watch, but the bond between the couple, which felt as though it had existed for many years as the director intended, and the devotion shown by the Trintignant character towards his wife, made me feel the value of life and love very strongly; and that it was a film that has to be seen, really. It is a noble example of the art of cinema, conveying a sense of dignity and the deepest caring. Michael Haneke's usually dispassionate style here has the unexpected effect of making it more affecting; by refusing all sentimentality he creates something that is very moving while never giving us more - or less - than the truth. It seems to go so much further than words can express, and much of the emotion of the film remains mute. Music is also present as a consolation, even if one that is rejected by the wife at a certain point, puzzlingly. Nevertheless the husband continues to take solace in it, imagining his wife's playing before she fell ill. The flat itself also has an amazing resonance, seeming to represent the years spent together, and being a refuge of sorts for Anne, even though, of course, this can only go so far. But her clear aversion to going back into hospital allows us to sense this, as well as her feeling the overriding desire to be near Georges in her hour of need. You can only hope that she feels less alone than her confinement in her body implies, but ultimately this is unknowable. The film points up a number of paradoxes and questions of this sort, but lightly - it is always concerned mainly with love and suffering.Read more ›
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64 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Stephen on 8 Dec 2012
Format: DVD
This film has to have five stars, for the quality of the acting, the film-making and the whole conception. It is not always easy to watch - it isn't meant to be. And the whole action, such as it is, unfolds gradually. The camera is mostly static, there is no background music, and scenes are quite long and their significance not always obvious.

The film is about an octogenarian French couple, wonderfully well acted (well, lived) by Jean-Louis Trintignant and Emmanuelle Riva. She suffers first one stroke, then another. He looks after her, because she has made him promise not to put her in a home. The task gets more and more difficult, and their life becomes turned in completely on itself. Almost all the film takes place in their apartment.

The faces of the two stars are unforgettable, and the way Riva deteriorates is shocking but very realistic. It is a very moving film, and highly recommended, but anyone who has experience of this kind of ordeal may find it difficult.
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Steve Paul on 8 Dec 2012
Format: DVD
I am not often motivated to write a review. But this is the best film I have seen for a while. Not an easy film to watch by any means though.
Superb direction, cinematography and acting make this surely the best French film of the year.
Minimalist in presentation, the acting is captivating and the story compelling. No special effects or background music to wind up the emotion.... just stark and profound acting in what at times seems real time.
If you are to watch just one foreign language film this year, watch this one.
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Format: DVD
Michael Haneke's `Amour' is the story of an elderly married couple, Georges (Jean Louis Trintignant) and Anne (Emmanuelle Riva), who have to come to terms with the last stages of their life together.

One morning over breakfast, Anne experiences a moment of open-eyed paralysis that changes her life entirely. Anne has an operation which fails, leading to a steady decline in mobility, wheelchair confinement, dementia and finally being bed-bound. Anne never liked hospitals and Georges had to promise Anne that he would never take her back, although Georges keeps his word this arrangement had its own problems as Georges has to cope with caring for Anne.

Haneke rejects the idea that death is a communal experience, Anne's journey towards death is an intensely solitary experience. Only Georges can understand her pain, their daughter (Isabelle Huppert) is marginalised through no fault of her own. Anne's degradation and embarrassment at not being able to look after herself is evidently real and hard to watch. Emmanuelle Riva is a revelation as Anne, revealing the physical indignity and vulnerability of Anne's unravelling state in such a frank and utterly brave performance.

Georges and Anne's relationship releases all sorts of emotions and questions, not least how we adapt and cope within a relationship which is constantly changing, regardless of age. You may not see them kiss, hug, hold hands or even say "I love you", theirs is a love borne of loyalty, kindness and devotion. Its heartbreaking to watch Georges who has spent so many wonderful years building a life together with his beloved Anne, facing up to the reality that she is slowly disappearing before him.

As harrowing as Anne's and Georges deterioration is, `Amour' is still fundamentally a touching story between two people who are utterly in love with each other till the very end.
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