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Amortals Mass Market Paperback – 28 Dec 2010


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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 413 pages
  • Publisher: Angry Robot (28 Dec. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0857660020
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857660022
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2.7 x 17.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Matt Forbeck has worked full-time as a writer and game designer since 1989 with many top companies, including Angry Robot, Atari, Boom! Studios, Games Workshop, High Voltage Software, IDW, Image Comics, Mattel, Penguin, Playmates Toys, Random House, Simon & Schuster, Ubisoft, and Wizards of the Coast. He has designed board games, collectible card games, roleplaying games, and miniatures games and has written comic books,computer games, magazines,novels, nonfiction, screenplays, and short fiction. His work has been published in over 10 languages.

His projects have been nominated for 24 Origins Awards and won 13. He has also won five ENnies. He is a proud member of the Alliterates writers' group, the International Association of Media Tie-In Writers, the International Thriller Writers, and the International Game Developers Association. He lives in Beloit, Wisconsin, with his wife Ann and their children: Marty, Pat, Nick, Ken, and Helen. Visit Forbeck.com for more details about him and his work.

Product Description

Review

"Matt Forbeck does near-future so well, I think he's been there. Actually, I think he designed it. Then he kicked its ass."
- Dan Abnett

“a light-hearted, enjoyable fantasy”
- Dark Animus, reviewing Dead Ball

“non-stop action, adventure, humor, and blood… Even during the darkest parts of this story I kept finding myself laughing out loud”
- Huntress Reviews, reviewing Rumble in the Jungle

About the Author

Matt Forbeck has worked full-time on fiction and games since 1989.

He has written novels, comic books, short stories, non-fiction (including the acclaimed Marvel Encyclopedia), magazine articles and computer game scripts. He has designed collectible card games, roleplaying games, miniatures and board games. His work has been published in at least a dozen different languages.

Matt is a proud member of the Alliterates writers group, the International Association of Media Tie-In Writers, and the International Game Developers Association. He lives in Beloit, Wisconsin, USA, with his wife Ann and their children: Marty, and the quadruplets: Pat, Nick, Ken and Helen. (And there’s a whole other story.)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Michael Watson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 25 Dec. 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I rather enjoyed this frenzy of pure escapism, especially with the main character, Ronan Dooley who is, it seems, a sort of long-life Dirty Harry. Set in USA in 2168 when those who can afford it, when killed or reach the end of their normal life span, can have their clone take over as a reincarnation - or, in the author's words, a revivification.

Thus Dooley who has been killed off in the line of duty many times, is now some 200 years old and still working for the Secret Service. If he stops working, his chance to be recloned will expire with him - whenever that arrives.

Naturally enough, there are several people interested in killing him off. After all, over 200 years you're bound to make a few enemies, I would have thought. The action is frenetic. Dooley escapes death time and again in his search for those who decapitated him the last time. Sounds odd? Yes, it is but it's a premise which works pretty well in this story.

Then there is the matter of Dooley's social life. Given his lifespan, it's reasonable to accept he has acquired a large number of descendants, met a few women, had a good time but, apart from the first of these, apparently not so much, though his loss of re-cloned memory doesn't help matters. Anyway, we do meet up with some of them and their part in the story does not detract from the main thread.

I think a little tighter editing would have helped the book, there being instances where little things are repeated unnecessarily but, overall, if you like futuristic stories with more than a toehold on present day values, this book will keep you entertained. As I said, Dirty Harry mixed with Bruce Willis's character from The Sixth Sense mixed with ...oh well, you get the picture.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 30 Oct. 2010
Format: Paperback
This offering is a strange tale firmly in the realm of science fiction as Forbeck's vision of the future blends elements from films such as Surrogates and The 6th Day.

It's definitely a novel tale that certainly has an unusual outlook, bringing a possible future to the reader today within this techno thriller alongside an excellent sense of pace. However, the downside to this offering is initially the principle character himself. Dooley is difficult to get a handle on and for the first part of the story is aloof to the reader which unfortunately makes him unlikeable. Yet as the story progresses the author helps the reader to not only sympathise with the hero but clearly, through dialogue, demonstrates that he is a man out of his time through the clever use of modern references.

It is well written and will definitely give the reader an adventure to enjoy yet unfortunately I cannot quite give up on the notion that I've read most of the conventions within this title before. Don't get me wrong, it is a nice piece of escapism but when you add a pretty swift ending to the tale with everything tied up in a neat bow, I did wonder if the story had ended up more as a screenplay originally than a story and was adapted to fit the brief.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul Tapner TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 6 Feb. 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
A work of near future science fiction, this is a stand alone novel that runs for three hundred and ten pages and has thirty eight chapters.

It's the story of Ronan Dooley. Or rather the latest version of him. An American secret service agent who died in the line of duty, he was brought back to life - in a manner of speaking - via the amortal process. This involves copies of a persons memories being downloaded into a cloned body. Which has all sorts of ramifications. Not least if you didn't back your memories up recently because then the new you could have a gap in their memories.

Which is a problem for the latest Ronan because he hadn't backed up in several months. And thus he has no idea what he'd been doing prior to the previous version of himself being murdered. A murder that was recorded and played out all over the web, seemingly by those opposed to the amortal process.

Ronan narrates the book in the first person and it's the story of his investigation into his own murder. And the startling discoveries he makes as a result.

The chapters are short and most end with cliffhangers that do keep the pace going. The writing is descriptive and clear, and the whole thing rattles along nicely enough. The ramifications of a world where this process exists have been thought through and there is enough detail to show the effect that has on society, and the way in which this world is subtly different from the one we know now.

At the same time the personal ramifications are also considered. Of someone who in effect can't die. And how that would get to you. With loved ones long gone and descendants who you might just outlive.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on 19 Feb. 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The basis of the book is that the world (actually only America, but the author assumes that this means the world) is run by a small group of immortals - sorry, amortals - who, should they be killed or get sick, just start up again in a cloned body with their memories preserved.

Sadly the core idea is not original. Richard Morgan did it better in Altered Carbon (Gollancz S.F.) although fair play to the author as does say he thought of the idea independently but had trouble getting published! What this book does well - somewhat better than Morgan in fact - is to look at the social implications of mind transfer. If the rich don't need to worry about getting sick, for example, then medical advances stall and life expectancy for everyone else starts to fall. Also, if there is no change in the leadership cadre, there is no change in society.

What the book does badly is squander this premise on a dumb detective novel, where the hero (on his ninth incarnation) investigates his own murder, or at least the murder of the eighth incarnation. The novel soon degenerates into a sequence of fights and chases, although the last couple of chapters are genuinely interesting and exciting.

Entertaining and undemanding - suitable for the beach.
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