American Monsters and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading American Monsters on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

American Monsters (Book I) [Paperback]

Sezin Koehler
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: £13.42 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 23 Sep.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £3.72  
Paperback £13.42  

Book Description

20 July 2014
An important work of post-modern feminist horror, American Monsters is a poignant, angry volume about predation, the corruption of the rave scene, and empowerment through trauma-related super-abilities. The first section of American Monsters is The Succubi Sideshow, a series of compelling vignettes introducing a wide range of characters. You'll find no happy, well-balanced individuals in this disturbing gallery. In the second section, The Phantastic Carnival, the Monsters are brought together through the murderous designs of a soul-hungry goddess. What could be a better lure for a big haul of youthful life-force than a spectacular Halloween party in a peculiar hill-top mansion? Non-Fiction, the third and final section of American Monsters, is a collection of moving and insightful essays. Packed with horror homages, American Monsters is a book for adventurous readers - ones who are not scared of non-traditional narratives, of evil smog-goddesses, or of women turning the tables.

Product details

  • Paperback: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Lulu.com (20 July 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1304376982
  • ISBN-13: 978-1304376985
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 15.2 x 1.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Sezin Koehler is a half American/half Sri Lankan adult Third Culture Kid whose resume of living abroad includes Sri Lanka, Zambia, Thailand, Pakistan, India, California, Switzerland, France, Spain, Turkey, Czech Republic, Germany, and now calls Lighthouse Point, Florida home. For the moment.

Sezin looks to Stephen King, Louise Erdrich, Alice Walker, Amy Tan, "Alice In Wonderland", "The Wizard of Oz", and "The Neverending Story" as great sources of inspiration, as well as a constant stream of horror films and television.

Reader, screenwriter, blogger, researcher, dancer, astrologer and photographer, Sezin writes horror fiction, fairy tales for grown ups, anecdotes about being an expat, movie and book reviews as well as academic theory about Lady Gaga.

Product Description

About the Author

A true third culture kid, Sezin Koehler had lived in five different countries on three continents by the time she was 15. It was in the USA however that her best friend was executed in front of her one night. Much of the spirit of American Monsters was shaped by this horrific event. She’s lived in six more countries since then, and is currently in Cologne, in Germany. A passionate defender of human rights, indigenous cultures and women’s interests, Sezin has (amongst others) worked for UNICEF, the Sioux Nation, Davos, Interfaith International, and Mars, Inc – the last position as a researcher into the history of chocolate in America. American Monsters is her first novel, although she has been writing since she could hold a pen. So far, there are four follow-up novels in the works, along with a collection of short stories and several photo books documenting her time in Prague. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.2 out of 5 stars
4.2 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gory and fascinating 23 Aug 2011
Format:Kindle Edition
American Monsters is half horror story, half reflections on horror, feminism and Sezin Koehler's own experiences. Both halves are very interesting to read. You'll want a strong stomach for the horror story, which features some powerful, vengeful and superpowered women and some extremely unpleasant men. Visceral and gripping.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Format:Kindle Edition
American Monsters is an unconventional work, part novel, part screenplay, part memoir, part academic thesis, whereby author Sezin Koehler explores the dark and female-phobic worlds of rave culture, horror fiction and academia.

The novel/screenplay is the story of a group of magical female characters who each discover hidden powers with which they destroy the men who abuse them and encounter each other at a rave held at the mansion of a hotel magnate in LA. They are lured into situations where they are forced by monstrous men to defend themselves with magical and physiological weapons worthy of Angela Carter, Kathy Acker or William Burroughs. It's a feminist revenge narrative in the form of Urban Fantasy replete with spirits, dark energies and creatively gruesome acts of violence. The memoir is the terrible and moving story of the murder of the author's friend Wendy by a girl who robbed her and her companions at gun-point one awful night in 2000. It tells of the author's trauma in the wake of the event and how she tried to heal herself and how the story of American Monsters was shaped by this life-changing experience. It's a tough read but it illuminates the fiction in an utterly compelling manner. The illumination is further brightened by the academic section of the book, which treats of the problems Koehler encountered as a 'third culture kid' who became embroiled in the LA rave scene and then became a participant-observer in that very scene when she studied anthropology. She gradually saw through the hippyish veneer of peace, love and co-operation to the ugly misogynistic truth underlying the ideology of the 24-hour-party-people generation in woman-hating America.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating Read From a Fascinating Person 19 Feb 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
Okay, firstly I'm going to come out and admit that I know the author, and though we've never met in person, we've conversed on a number of occasions and gotten to know each other somewhat. I admit this because I don't want what I have to say about Sezin's work to be construed as some hidden agenda. I believe that my reviews of films, books and TV shows on various websites require me to be as open and honest about what I critique, even when it's from my friends.

AMERICAN MONSTERS is many things: open, honest, intelligent, original, harrowing, intriguing. It is *not* shallow, light reading. But it *is* a compelling and thought-provoking work on feminism and the horror genre.

Sezin has divided her work into two parts, of differing formats but still connected once seen as a whole, though you can read each of them, separately and gain something different from them. The first part is fiction, and is headed by The Succubi Sideshow, a dark collection of vignettes introducing a wide, wild range of different but still related characters, people with monstrous natures both within and without, who are both offenders and victims, and the vignettes explore equally monstrous themes such as violence, rape, exploitation, suicide, loneliness. There are unflinching scenes, but nothing is done with exploitation or titillation in mind. Sezin depicts these terrible things for what they are.

The Monsters presented here are assembled together in The Phantastic Carnival, which is presented in a movie script format, which on reading it would make for a heady and satisfying movie experience (I should also make note of the wonderful, stylistic watercolour illustrations throughout, provided by artist Rose Deniz).
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing horror 11 Sep 2011
Format:Kindle Edition
Half slasher horror screenplay, half treatise on the genres of horror, Koehler pulls no punches in her character creations and mad scenario. She turns the classic American slasher on its head with detailed female characters with both pasts and presence. In a fascinatiing series of essays that accompany the fiction, she reveals the personal and creative processes that lead to American Monsters.

I'm looking forward to more from this author.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating Read From a Fascinating Person 19 Feb 2012
By Derek Shannon - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Okay, firstly I'm going to come out and admit that I know the author, and though we've never met in person, we've conversed on a number of occasions and gotten to know each other somewhat. I admit this because I don't want what I have to say about Sezin's work to be construed as some hidden agenda. I believe that my reviews of films, books and TV shows on various websites require me to be as open and honest about what I critique, even when it's from my friends.

AMERICAN MONSTERS is many things: open, honest, intelligent, original, harrowing, intriguing. It is *not* shallow, light reading. But it *is* a compelling and thought-provoking work on feminism and the horror genre.

Sezin has divided her work into two parts, of differing formats but still connected once seen as a whole, though you can read each of them, separately and gain something different from them. The first part is fiction, and is headed by The Succubi Sideshow, a dark collection of vignettes introducing a wide, wild range of different but still related characters, people with monstrous natures both within and without, who are both offenders and victims, and the vignettes explore equally monstrous themes such as violence, rape, exploitation, suicide, loneliness. There are unflinching scenes, but nothing is done with exploitation or titillation in mind. Sezin depicts these terrible things for what they are.

The Monsters presented here are assembled together in The Phantastic Carnival, which is presented in a movie script format, which on reading it would make for a heady and satisfying movie experience (I should also make note of the wonderful, stylistic watercolour illustrations throughout, provided by artist Rose Deniz).

Possibly the most difficult part to read was in the second part, The Night the Sky Opened Up, but only because it was so difficult to read the account of events which truly happened to someone I know. It's an open, honest, distressing autobiographical account of the worst day in Sezin's life, when in Los Angeles she bore witness to the murder of her best, dearest friend Wendy, to whom this book is dedicated. It was an event which pushed Sezin into a brutal time, full of trauma, depression and distress, but which also spawned her into writing the fictional parts of this book. Her account is rich in detail and minutiae, harrowing and compelling, giving us a glimpse not only into real-life horror, but also the psyche of a fascinating, erudite individual and how this shaped her life and thinking.

The essays which follow are an intelligent, fascinating read, discussing and analyzing a wide variety of topics: The Compiler: On Truth and Synchronicity, for instance, touches on the rave culture, the portrayal of vampires, the unique perspective afforded "Third Culture Kids" like Sezin (and myself) in anthropological discussions, and the dichotomy between male and female psychologies when interpreting horror film and fiction. And What Horror Means - An Essay focuses on women/mothers as the Monster in works such as Stephen King, in particular The Shining, and this one I found a particular eye-opener, allowing me to look on a story I thought I knew with new eyes.

There's also an Afterword, written more than ten years following the events, and I am grateful for this section, for it was an uplifting coda to the life of a woman who had gone through Hell, had been changed by it, but not destroyed. She has led a fascinating life, and I want more people to know her through this.
4.0 out of 5 stars A must read for women and horror lovers 14 Oct 2012
By Tammy - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
For a truly unique and in depth look at the myriad faces culturally entrenched misogyny wears, American Monsters pulls no punches. Author Sezin Koehler digs deeply into the collective consciousness of women across America and flips pile after pile of dirt off the coffins of rape and abuse survivors' fear, shame, guilt, and horror, allowing those ugly and emaciated skeletons to dance again and bare their shunned stories for all to see. And that type of storytelling is what is needed in a culture that still treats the subject of rape as a thing for entertainment and titillation.

And this is only part one of American Monsters.

In part two, Sezin provides a series of non-fiction analytical essays that unpack a variety of theories on the horror genre in American culture, arguing convincingly that the genre itself is rooted on the victimization and otherizing of women. Using examples from works by the King of Horror himself, as well as many popular movies, Sezin's understanding and explanation of the roots and impact of the genre on women and societal attitudes in general gives readers a fascinating and thought-provoking range of ideas to digest.

This book will take you through a roller coaster of emotions--ferocious anger, divine celebration, and marveling thoughtfulness. I highly recommend it to anyone with a uterus, an interest in those with a uterus, and a hunger for a more thorough look at our society's trends and attitudes towards women, specifically as it relates to the horror genre. If you're a fan of the book (Amazon won't let me post the title, so I'll just say it rhymes with Runt) by Inga Muscio, American Monsters will take the place on your library shelf beside it.
5.0 out of 5 stars Under the radar, but brilliant-- 29 July 2012
By Michael D. Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
The review by D. O'Brien does an excellent job breaking down and building up this stunning book, but I have to add my voice to the chorus and encourage people to read American Monsters. Unique in its structure and organization, the writing is alternately breathtaking, frightening, crazy amazing stories, tears made of words, the whole of it just raw being. Just, Wow. I do not review here, but in this case I needed to shout, "Must read!"
5.0 out of 5 stars Under the radar, but brilliant-- 28 July 2012
By Michael D. Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The review by D. O'Brien does an excellent job breaking down and building up this stunning book, but I have to add my voice to the chorus and encourage people to read American Monsters. Unique in its structure and organization, the writing is alternately breathtaking, frightening, crazy amazing stories, tears made of words, the whole of it just raw being. Just, Wow. I do not review here, but in this case I needed to shout, "Must read!"
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating Read From a Fascinating Person 18 Feb 2012
By Derek Shannon - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
Okay, firstly I'm going to come out and admit that I know the author, and though we've never met in person, we've conversed on a number of occasions and gotten to know each other somewhat. I admit this because I don't want what I have to say about Sezin's work to be construed as some hidden agenda. I believe that my reviews of films, books and TV shows on various websites require me to be as open and honest about what I critique, even when it's from my friends.

AMERICAN MONSTERS is many things: open, honest, intelligent, original, harrowing, intriguing. It is *not* shallow, light reading. But it *is* a compelling and thought-provoking work on feminism and the horror genre.

Sezin has divided her work into two parts, of differing formats but still connected once seen as a whole, though you can read each of them, separately and gain something different from them. The first part is fiction, and is headed by The Succubi Sideshow, a dark collection of vignettes introducing a wide, wild range of different but still related characters, people with monstrous natures both within and without, who are both offenders and victims, and the vignettes explore equally monstrous themes such as violence, rape, exploitation, suicide, loneliness. There are unflinching scenes, but nothing is done with exploitation or titillation in mind. Sezin depicts these terrible things for what they are.

The Monsters presented here are assembled together in The Phantastic Carnival, which is presented in a movie script format, which on reading it would make for a heady and satisfying movie experience (I should also make note of the wonderful, stylistic watercolour illustrations throughout, provided by artist Rose Deniz).

Possibly the most difficult part to read was in the second part, The Night the Sky Opened Up, but only because it was so difficult to read the account of events which truly happened to someone I know. It's an open, honest, distressing autobiographical account of the worst day in Sezin's life, when in Los Angeles she bore witness to the murder of her best, dearest friend Wendy, to whom this book is dedicated. It was an event which pushed Sezin into a brutal time, full of trauma, depression and distress, but which also spawned her into writing the fictional parts of this book. Her account is rich in detail and minutiae, harrowing and compelling, giving us a glimpse not only into real-life horror, but also the psyche of a fascinating, erudite individual and how this shaped her life and thinking.

The essays which follow are an intelligent, fascinating read, discussing and analyzing a wide variety of topics: The Compiler: On Truth and Synchronicity, for instance, touches on the rave culture, the portrayal of vampires, the unique perspective afforded "Third Culture Kids" like Sezin (and myself) in anthropological discussions, and the dichotomy between male and female psychologies when interpreting horror film and fiction. And What Horror Means - An Essay focuses on women/mothers as the Monster in works such as Stephen King, in particular The Shining, and this one I found a particular eye-opener, allowing me to look on a story I thought I knew with new eyes. There's also an Afterword, written more than ten years following the events, and I am grateful for this section, for it was an uplifting coda to the life of a woman who had gone through Hell, had been changed by it, but not destroyed. She has led a fascinating life, and I want more people to know her through this.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback