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Amarcord [DVD] [1973]


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Amarcord [DVD] [1973] + Roma [DVD] + Federico Fellini 8 1/2 HD Remastered [DVD]
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Product details

  • Actors: Pupella Maggio, Armando Brancia, Magali Noel, Ciccio Ingrassia, Nando Orfei
  • Directors: Federico Fellini
  • Format: PAL, Mono, Subtitled, Widescreen, Colour
  • Language: Italian, French, English
  • Subtitles: English, French, Italian, German, Spanish, Arabic, Dutch
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: 27 Sept. 2004
  • Run Time: 118 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0002KRU0G
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 10,153 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Fellini's Oscar-winning homage to his home town of Rimini remains his most popular film. An ensemble drama with notes of both comedy and tragedy - as well as a piquant infusion of the politics of the era (the 1930s, which saw the emergence of fascism) - the film captures a year in the life of the Mediterranean seaside town through a series of nostalgic anecdotal vignettes of a fantastic array of events and characters, all tenderly shot in soft, muted colours. Loopy teachers, strange foreigners, curvaceous women, a skinny nymphomaniac and a crazed solitary motorcyclist are just a few of the bizzare, but very human, characters whom Fellini depicts experiencing the wonder and disillusionment of their everyday lives.

Synopsis

A year in the life of a provincial seaside town in the 1930s through a series of nostalgic vignettes which reflect the bizarre mixture of characters and events that the town attracts.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

80 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Budge Burgess on 9 Feb. 2005
Format: DVD
"Amarcord" ('I remember') is Federico Fellini's impression of a year in the 1930's: a surreal carnival of memories, it is a film with no plot, but with haunting images - caricatures of the petit bourgeoisie, satires of provincial institutions. Teachers are portrayed as inflexible, autocratic. The Church is obsessed with stamping out masturbation. Families are dysfunctional - a crazed uncle climbs a tree to shout that he needs a woman ... only to be coaxed down by a midget nun. The whole town takes to the sea to wait, late into the night, for a glimpse of a passing liner.
"Amarcord" is a series of loosely linked vignettes. A lawyer tries to act as ringmaster, giving us background information about the town of Rimini. It had been bombed flat in 1943-44. Fellini reconstructs fantastic memories of the place. Nostalgia, he implies, is fantasy - our reconstruction of memories as little dramas.
There is a monochrome quality to "Amarcord"; the actors wear dark clothing ... a few appear in red, such as the local hairdresser, Gradisca, focus of much teenage lust. The costumes evoke a sense of how and why that person is remembered.
If there is a central character, it is the town square, the focus of communal life. Here, the townsfolk come and go, participating in spectacles like burning an effigy of a witch or watching a Fascist politician deliver his speech.
The direction emphasises Fellini's affection for people. Fellini's politics is humanist rather than doctrinaire ... he invites an exploration of consciousness, famously asking his audience to see his films, not to try to understand them. Many of his films are autobiographical - you take to them and from them something of your own memories ... some shared feeling, some new insight.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Claude on 30 July 2009
Format: DVD
Already having a video recording (complete with adverts) I was pleased to see 'Amarcord' was finally out on DVD however, unfortunately in the transfer to DVD the film has suffered from a number of cuts. Why ?
It was a wonderful film.
I can only presume that whoever has done this is frightened to death to have a portrait of 'Fascist Italy' shown sometimes rather sympathetically and with humour, although I don't think the film seeks to make an opinion one way or the other. It is too busy telling the story of Fellini's childhood and this is, inevitably, set against the backdrop of 'Fascist Italy'.
The cuts do seem to focus on these areas.
How sad. Anyone who has seen the original complete version will be disappointed by this (abridged) version.
A word to the editor (censor) 'Don't live your life in fear !'
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dr René Codoni on 17 Aug. 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Amarcord (Federico Fellini, 1973, 124')

Amarcord is a 1973 Italian comedy-drama, a semi-autobiographical coming-of-age tale about Titta, an adolescent boy growing up among an eccentric cast of characters in the fictional town of Borgo (based on Fellini's hometown of Rimini) in 1930s Fascist Italy. The film's title is Romagnol for "I remember". Titta's sentimental education is emblematic of Italy's "lapse of conscience". It skewers Mussolini's ludicrous posturings and those of a Catholic Church, which "imprisoned Italians in a perpetual adolescence", by mocking himself and his fellow villagers in comic scenes that underline their incapacity to adopt genuine moral responsibility, or outgrow foolish sexual fantasies.

Federico Fellini (1920-1993) was a film director and scriptwriter. Known for a distinct style that blends fantasy and baroque images, he is considered one of the most influential filmmakers of the 20th century. Amarcord won the 1975 Oscar for Best Foreign Film - his fifth after La Strada (1954), Le notti di Cabiria (1957), 8½ (Otto e Mezzo, 1963), I clowns (1970). The film was destined to be Fellini's last major commercial success. I have already written for amazon uk my reviews number 20 on La dolce vita (1960), 105 on Boccaccio '70‬ (episode Le tentazioni del dottor Antonio, 1962), ‬‬‬‬106 on Histoires extraordinaires (episode Toby Dammit, 1968), and for amazon us 50us on E la nave va (1983). Other major films are I vitelloni (1953), Roma (1972), Il Casanova di Federico Fellini (1976), and Ginger e Fred (1986).

Released in Italy in December 1973, Amarcord was an "unmitigated success".
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Yeoman on 10 April 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A series of visually astonishing vignettes evoking Fellini's childhood Rimini. The Biondi family form the focal point through which we meet a series of colourful characters and situations, none greater than than the gorgeously teasing 'Gradisca'. Funny, lustful and yearning without a hint of mawkish sentimentality. Quite simply wonderful, one of Fellini's most accessible and certainly one of my favourite films of any time or genre.

One point to take care with (without stating the obvious) is that the dubbing is mind-numbingly atrocious so make sure you select the subtitle option at the outset.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Keith M TOP 500 REVIEWER on 23 Aug. 2013
Format: DVD
This 1973 film co-written and directed by Federico Fellini is a truly wonderful trip down memory lane, as the director recalls his own upbringing, setting his film near the Adriatic coastal city (and seaside resort) of Rimini during the 1930s. For Amarcord, Fellini largely eschews the fantasy elements and more technical innovations of his films of the preceding decade, and instead makes (for me) a welcome return to the more warm-hearted (and communal) realism of earlier films such as La Strada and I Vitelloni. Here, Fellini traces an entire lifecycle in the history of his close-knit community, focusing on the Biondi family (in which the teenage boy, Titta, is assumed to have autobiographical connotations for the director), and imbuing his film with hilarious (and touching) moments of humour, as well as exploring favoured themes of religion, cinema, and (here, predominantly adolescent) sex, in addition to the more serious political undercurrent of the growth of Mussolini's fascist party (albeit, treated by Fellini with scathing satire).

Taking the form of a series of individual vignettes, rather than being based around a single narrative thread, Amarcord is never less than an impressive visual spectacle (courtesy of Giuseppe Rotunno's cinematography), and never more so than during the opening sequence, a vibrant festival scene, marking the end of winter and start of spring, taking in the ceremonial burning of a witch dummy and introducing us to the communal life of the town, with its local whore, blind man, Ronald Coleman-lookalike cinema owner, and glamorous ladies taking the evening passeggiata.
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