£0.95
  • RRP: £5.94
  • You Save: £4.99 (84%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 14 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Always Room for One More ... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Always Room for One More (Owlet Book) Paperback – 15 Mar 1972


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£0.95
£0.95 £0.01
£0.95 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Only 14 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


Product details

  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Henry Holt & Company; Reissue edition (15 Mar. 1972)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805003304
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805003307
  • Product Dimensions: 19.9 x 0.3 x 16.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,028,284 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Always Room for One More Lachie MacLachlan generously invites in every traveler who passes his "wee house" until the walls truly burst. A Caldecott Medal winner. Full description

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 May 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is a short children's version of an old Scottish folk song about Lachen MacLaclan and his family who always have room for visitors in their home. They keep letting visitors in until their house bursts. But, all is set aright by the end of the song, the music also being provided in the book. And, children always seem to like to sing. The illustrator, Nonny Hogrogian, won the 1966 Caldecott Medal for best illustrations in a book for children.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Simply the best 15 Dec. 2000
By Brett C. Seekins - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Without reservation, simply one of the best written and illustrated children stories ever.
This tale, based in Scotland, portends familial strife at a particular domicle. Their house is simply too small. Yet, the family is continually interrupted by uninvited strangers passing through their town with problems of their own, knocking on their door.
Although there is no physical room in the house, the family somehow makes room for the visitor. And then, the family experiences an ultimate discomfort.
Read the rest. A happy ending that will bring tears of enrichment every read.
I lost my first copy. I just ordered 5 more. 2 for me (in case I lose another) and a few for those friends that just had babies.
Hey, a Caldecott winner, too.....
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Always room for this book in my classroom 21 May 2002
By Jay - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Adapted from a Scottish folksong, the text reads like a poem be-cause the words have not been changed. The illustrations are done with very simple techniques of hashing and sponge painting, but do a very effective job of supplementing the text which can be difficult at times due tot he Scottish dialect. However, a glossary is given as well as some background information on the folksong. The music is also provided so it could be performed by the class to better understand the story and broadening both the activities that can be done and the ages this book can be used with.
Why 5 stars?:
This book is a great introduction into the form of Scottish folksongs. The background information as well as the sheet music provided will enable it to be used in a much broader spectrum. The illustrations, while not stunning, will definitely catch the eye. Younger children may not appreciate the aesthetic qualities of the pictures or text, but will still enjoy the comical story.
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Can the house take in one more visitor? 15 May 1999
By R. D. Allison (dallison@biochem.med.ufl.edu) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is a short children's version of an old Scottish folk song about Lachen MacLaclan and his family who always have room for visitors in their home. They keep letting visitors in until their house bursts. But, all is set aright by the end of the song, the music also being provided in the book. And, children always seem to like to sing. The illustrator, Nonny Hogrogian, won the 1966 Caldecott Medal for best illustrations in a book for children.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Twas a bit o' a but and a ben 14 Feb. 2005
By E. R. Bird - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The 1960s were a time of wildness and experimentation. Crazy colors, unique new thoughts conceived in the streets, a new acceptance of people who were different from us, THIS is the legacy we can credit to that time. And did children's books remain unaffected by this shift in cultural consciousness? Not a jot! Take the 1968 "Drummer Hoff" by Barbara Emberly. Now that's a Caldecott winner, my friends. But the wacky 60s didn't affect just Hoff and his warlike tendencies. Sorche Nic Leodhas's, "Always Room For One More" is a truly fascinating look at how artists in the children's publishing world were experimenting with new techniques and presentations. While the story behind this book is rather staid and normal, the art found within is a topsy-turvy combination of different styles, techniques, and forms. A beautiful book that remains quite lovely to the eye.

Written in slightly Americanized Scottish brogue, the book tells the tale of a man, his wife, and their, "bairns to the number of ten" who live in a small cottage by themselves. Always kind and generous, their patriarch Lachie MacLachlan (can't beat it) is apt to invite anyone he sees to come and stay with him and his family. So before you know it the house contains the original family of 12 plus a tinker, a tailor, a sailor, a gallowglass, a fishing lass, a merry ault wife, four peat-cutters, a ranter, and a shepherd with his dog. Everyone has a gay old time dancing and partying about but though the family may have heart as large as the ocean, there's the actual physical problem of how large the house is and how much it can take. Before anyone knows what's happening, the walls and roof are "dinged down" and everyone finds themselves sprawled outside without a house anymore. This could be dire. This could be bleak. But fortunately the people invited to the home are caring souls so they build a much bigger house for the family of ten. One that could contain any number of strangers Lachie and his MacLachlans invite. Happy ending for one and all.

The tale this most represents, to my mind, is Pete Seeger's fabuous "Foolish Frog" song/book. And to be frank, the Seeger version is twice as catchy and three times as funny as Leodhas's tale. Still, there's a lot to love in this book. Leodhas includes a bit of background at the end of her tale, along with a Scottish to English glossary of terms. For those of you who didn't know what a Gallowglass was, this is the place to find out (no, it has nothing to do with glass). There's even sheet music for the musically inclined prone to singing their children's books aloud. But as I mentioned earlier, it's Nonny Hogrogian's illustrations that catch the eye here. Alongside the beautiful cross-hatched pen and ink illustrations are tufts of green, purple, and grey. Unfortunately for me, the book I was reading didn't have any explanations of how Hogrogian created these pictures. But however it was, they're truly evocative. The cliffs are particularly cliffy. The heather and gorse cheery and dour all at the same time. The whole book seems to take place against a grey cloudy sky, but there's a lightheartedness that defies the awful weather. True, all the children (once we get close) seem to look exactly the same only with different styles of hair, but that doesn't distract from the distant landscape scenes in the least.

The book is a fine way for anyone to connect children to the Scottish heritage in some way. It's a fun little book, though I would certainly recommend that it be read aloud by someone adept at Scottish brogue. Otherwise it might come off sounding a bit odd. Though certainly not one of the most memorable of the Caldecott Award winners (try finding one in the New York Public Library and see how many copies you find), it's still an enjoyable little number. Recommended, if not too heartily.
Enjoyable 4 Jan. 2011
By J. Cowan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Our family has Scottish roots, so I like that this book is a traditional Scottish song and includes a glossary of terms at the back. My 9-year-old really likes it. I was surprised to see that it's considered a third-to-fourth grade reading level at her school, where they use a levelled system from A to Z. It would be appealing to younger children too if read or sung aloud.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback