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Allegro
 
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Allegro

First Complete Recording
1 Mar 2010 | Format: MP3

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Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
5:23
30
2
3:56
30
3
1:27
30
4
0:15
30
5
0:40
30
6
3:07
30
7
5:38
30
8
1:10
30
9
0:51
30
10
0:13
30
11
0:14
30
12
0:38
30
13
3:21
30
14
0:55
30
15
1:10
30
16
2:12
30
17
2:53
30
18
0:42
30
19
0:41
30
20
4:29
30
21
3:08
30
22
1:45
30
23
1:52
30
24
0:25
30
25
0:29
30
26
1:30
30
27
2:10
30
28
0:54
30
29
5:57
Disc 2
30
1
3:00
30
2
0:48
30
3
3:41
30
4
3:07
30
5
0:50
30
6
0:13
30
7
1:30
30
8
0:56
30
9
3:56
30
10
2:54
30
11
0:10
30
12
3:09
30
13
4:55
30
14
3:28
30
15
4:24


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 3 Feb 2009
  • Release Date: 3 Feb 2009
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Masterworks Broadway
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:35:06
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001PMB2MW
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 178,910 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Rossignol on 27 Jun 2009
Format: Audio CD
Allegro was first staged in 1947,and ran for (only?) 315 performances,which by Rodgers and Hammerstein's previous form(Allegro was preceeded by Oklahoma and Carousel,so it had a lot to live up to.) Maybe it was a "Flop"by those standards,but as R&H went on to follow it with South Pacific and The King and I,it had a lot to compete with.
Since then it has been unfairly ignored,even though there WAS a concert performance in 1994 (with a revised and not complete score).It has taken this album(with the complete score) to reveal what aficionados already knew,it has the required strengths to stand by ANY of R&H other musicals,especially given the excellent cast.
How could it be anything else when Stephen Sondheim,who was who was a production assistant for the original Broadway production,sat in on the recording sessions.
It would be great if someone had the courage to mount a staged production.
BTW,Oscar Hammerstein II (who died in 1960) has two speaking lines in this new recording,these come (it seems) fro an old dictation tape of Hammerstein's.Sondheim himself also has some spoken lines on this recording.
If you love R&H musicals,and who doesn't,you cannot afford to miss this.

As I have now listened to this set several times,I thought I would append some thoughts.
I can see why the 1947 Broadway Theatregoers were disappointed by this work.They were expecting a big R&H musical, with showstoppers,and a fantasy plot to lift them from the post WW2 gloom.
What they got was a charming,wistful & moving domestic show.
R&H were obviously harking back to the happy days between the two world wars,and trying (unsucessfully, by the run of the musical) to say that this homely spirit of the US was still there if we looked for it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. L. Rees TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 13 Feb 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
A Rodgers & Hammerstein "also ran", long overdue for reassessment. This excellent first ever full length recording encourages exactly that, its score most tuneful and immensely appealing. Its theme has become ever more pertinent in these days when materialism crowds out so much of true value.

This is the story of Joseph Taylor Jnr, a Greek style chorus tracing his progress from birth to middle age. A highly talented doctor, like his father, he chooses to leave the small community in the mid-West. Too dull! For him - the fast lane, the bright lights, the city, he to be where the money is. In due course comes awareness this is not how life should be - everything so meretricious, he reduced to pampering rich patients who are not really ill. It is time to return to his roots. Far less money will be coming in, but he in every other aspect will be infinitely richer.

Throughout there is much to applaud, many melodies that linger - "A Fellow Needs a Girl", "So Far", "You Are Never Away", "Money Isn't Everything", "The Gentleman is a Dope", "Allegro", etc. The singers are first rate (Joseph Jnr sung by Patrick Wilson, Raoul in the film of "The Phantom of the Opera").

Richard Rodgers had a soft spot for this musical and longed to give it another try. Other things kept getting in the way ("South Pacific", "The King and I", "The Sound of Music" - to name but a few). He felt the innovative staging may have put people off. In fact that very staging fired the imagination of people like Stephen Sondheim and producer Hal Prince, their offerings forever destined to extend the boundaries. "Oklahoma!" instantly transformed the history of the musical. "Allegro" took longer, but transformed it nonetheless. In so many ways it deserves respect and affection. Give it a try.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Trevor L on 28 Aug 2010
Format: Audio CD
This recording is a must for anyone who enjoys musical theatre. It is beautifully performed and beautifully recorded. The earlier reviews set out the history of the show. It is easy to see why the plot was not popular when the show was first produced. There is a parallel there with Sondheim's "Anyone can whistle" (also a flop, initially, with a great score). Yeston's "Nine" did not put off more modern audiences. Hammerstein was not afraid of being controversial (the establishment wanted "Carefully taught" taken out of South Pacific) but his side swipe at rich society in Allegro did not appeal to a 1940s audience. It is such a pity because some vintage R & H songs have remained largely hidden.
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