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All-American Boy
 
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All-American Boy

28 Aug 2003 | Format: MP3

7.92 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
3:48
2
7:07
3
3:42
4
6:17
5
4:20
6
5:45
7
4:43
8
5:45


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 31 July 1998
  • Release Date: 31 July 1998
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 41:27
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B006NY1NM6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 122,414 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By EuroBee on 4 Jun 2004
Format: Audio CD
After leaving the glory years of Mott the Hoople behind him, Ian Hunter's first (eponymous) solo album in 1975 provided more-of-the-same: singalong choruses and driving rock/pop numbers, interspersed with the odd down-tempo ballad.
But his second solo album - "All American Alien Boy" - saw a significant change in direction. It also saw him slip up one, maybe two, levels in terms of songwriting. The result was one of the great albums of the 1970s - something of a "lost classic".
The 8 outstanding songs on show here display such imagination, in terms of concepts, lyrics and arrangements, that the term "quantum leap" is - for once - surely justified, even if Hunter didn't take all of his fan base with him on this one. Hunter's vision is also superbly executed by an oustanding backing band (including Jaco Pastorius).
Lovers of the 70s will also be able to detect something of a "concept album" feel on AAAB, with its clear contrast between wistful/jaundiced reflections on the Old World ("Letter to Britannia from the Union Jack" and - the template for all piano ballads - "Irene Wilde") and the quickly tainted idealism/optimism of the New World (the Dixie-tinged "All American Alien Boy", "Apathy 83" and the abrasive "Restless Youth"). Personal favourite? The album closer "God (Take 1)" - typical Hunter-at-his-best: insistent, poignant, thought-provoking and, of course, criminally neglected by the great music-loving public...
A classic. Five stars. No question.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By "exorcist12" on 17 Feb 2004
Format: Audio CD
AAAB has been and always will be my favourite music album. It encapsulates everything that is great about Rock Music in eight tracks. There are ballads,love songs and great driving rock songs. Singer songwriters like Ian Hunter are a rare breed. They write with a skill and dexterity that is seldom seen today outside of the work they continue to produce.
If you want an intro to Ian's music then this is it.The first track 'Letter to Brittania from the Union Jack' is the greatest song ever written.
Ian Hunter........rocks last genius !!
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By M. Dench on 23 April 2006
Format: Audio CD
First off, I have to say that this is easily one of the high points of Ian Hunter's career, and he's had many high points. This is a fantastically good album, critically acclaimed and generally well received. Ironically, having found an 'artistic' vein, Ian followed it up with Overnight Angels (with Earl Slick), which was fairly artless. But that's another story.

So, no complaints about this re-release. It's one of the great albums of the last 30 years. And the packaging and sleeve notes are great, restoring lost artwork to the package, and giving us the historical background to the album. Where it does fall down flat on it's face, though, is in the choice of bonus tracks. The only one that really is a bonus is the early single version of the title track, which is quite different. The others are all different takes of album tracks, and it's not easy to tell the difference, other than the lack of overdubs. If you were to take the sax and backing vocals away from 'You Nearly Did Me In', I don't think it would sound any different to 'Weary Anger'. This in itself would not be so bad if the previously mentioned excellent sleeve notes didn't mention several tracks recorded for the album but not released with it. What would be more desirable - rejected takes of well known songs, or finished versions of unknown songs from the same album sessions? Tricky. Clearly too tricky for Sony who left them all off, with the little caveat that they may appear on some future release. Whoopee, I can hardly wait. But hold on, I'm going to have to.

Great album, great packaging, great opportunity to provide a really great all round release missed - thrown away actually!

Buy it anyway, it's superb.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Paul Ess. on 2 April 2009
Format: Audio CD
Ian Hunter sings like a rating who's been in the salty spray too long. On 'All American Alien Boy' he belts out sturdy anthems and bewitchingly lyrical ballads with admirable spit and fierce passion.

He is worryingly below most peoples radar. Normally I'd be thrilled about this, but in Hunter's case it seems strangely criminal. Just because he's from the Borders doesn't automatically mean he has to remain a cult figure. He is a VITALLY important singer/songwriter; up there with the best and it sickens me watching the same pathetic old lags getting lauded and statued-up each time there's an 'Awards Ceremony' (a poor media euphemism for 'celebrities getting trolleyed') while, with rare exceptions, Hunter gets elbowed into the shadows.

I'll spell it out - in his pomp (ie here), he's easily as good as peak Dylan or Morrison. His words mean as much and his music is as spellbinding.
'Letter to Britannia From the Union Jack' and 'Irene Wilde' are two of the greatest songs ever written by an Englishman, yet how many of you reading this have heard either...?
Forget Jagger or Lennon, this is where to find the real rock and soul of the UK.

Hunter (along with Iggy Pop, Bowie, Reed, Bolan, Townshend, Smith etc etc ) is often cited as a 'Godfather of Punk'.
Why do people do this? How many 'Godfathers' does a sub-culture need? He writes beautifully about gritty and occasionally mundane subjects - is this all you need to do to get canonised by the faithless?
Bolan's credentials are even more tenuous bless him - he had the Damned on his TV show (For the record; Peter Cook was the Godfather of Punk Rock and opinions to the contrary are for the weak!).

I digress; 'All American Alien Boy' is brilliant, enriching rock music.
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