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Alice's Adventures Under Ground [illustrated] [Kindle Edition]

Lewis Carroll
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (954 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £4.14
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Book Description

Alice was published in 1865, three years after the Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and the Reverend Robinson Duckworth rowed in a boat, on 4 July 1862, up the River Thames with the three young daughters of Henry Liddell, (the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University and Dean of Christ Church) : Lorina Charlotte Liddell (aged 13, born 1849) ("Prima" in the book's prefatory verse); Alice Pleasance Liddell (aged 10, born 1852) ("Secunda" in the prefatory verse); Edith Mary Liddell (aged 8, born 1853) ("Tertia" in the prefatory verse).

The journey began at Folly Bridge near Oxford and ended five miles away in the village of Godstow. During the trip the Reverend Dodgson told the girls a story that featured a bored little girl named Alice who goes looking for an adventure. The girls loved it, and Alice Liddell asked Dodgson to write it down for her. He began writing the manuscript of the story the next day, although that earliest version no longer exists. The girls and Dodgson took another boat trip a month later when he elaborated the plot to the story of Alice, and in November he began working on the manuscript in earnest.

To add the finishing touches he researched natural history for the animals presented in the book, and then had the book examined by other children—particularly the MacDonald children. He added his own illustrations but approached John Tenniel to illustrate the book for publication, telling him that the story had been well liked by children.

On 26 November 1864 he gave Alice the handwritten manuscript of Alice's Adventures Under Ground, with illustrations by Dodgson himself, dedicating it as "as Christmas gift to a dear child in memory of a summer's day". Some, including Martin Gardner, speculate there was an earlier version that was destroyed later by Dodgson when he printed a more elaborate copy by hand.

But before Alice received her copy, Dodgson was already preparing it for publication and expanding the 15,500-word original to 27,500 words, most notably adding the episodes about the Cheshire Cat and the Mad Tea-Party.

Product Description

About the Author

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832 – 1898), better known by his pen name, as “Lewis Carroll”, was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, as well as the poems "The Hunting of the Snark" and "Jabberwocky", all examples of the genre of literary nonsense.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2254 KB
  • Print Length: 130 pages
  • Publisher: E-launch Publishing (17 May 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0051GPJVI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (954 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #374,450 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Lewis Carroll was born on 27 January 1832. He studied at Christ Church, Oxford and went on to become a mathematics lecturer there from 1855 to 1881. Lewis Carroll's most famous works are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (published in 1865) and the sequel Alice Through the Looking-Glass, which contains the classic nonsense poem The Jabberwocky (published in 1872).

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
92 of 97 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All Of Alice 28 July 2009
By Dave_42
People tend to lump "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass (and What Alice Found There)" into one collection which has taken on the new title of "Alice in Wonderland". This is probably a product of the movies, which took bits and pieces from each and made a composite adventure. This was possible, because Lewis Carroll (a.k.a. Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) managed to make the stories so even in quality that they can be put together seamlessly. He also managed to keep the stories enough different, that one can still enjoy reading both of them one after the other, without the feeling that the second is just a retelling of the first.

To be sure, there are several ways in which the stories are similar, but not to the point where it detracts from the reader's enjoyment of the story. There are only three characters which appear in both books, one of which is Alice. The other notable characters (the Cheshire Cat, the Queen of Hearts, Tweedledum and Tweedledee, Humpty Dumpty, etc.) are well distributed between the two books. Thus there is a looking-glass between the two, just as the looking-glass plays such a key role in the second book.

The Penguin Classics edition of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass" includes both books including the illustrations by John Tenniel. It also includes the original "Alice's Adventures under Ground" which includes Lewis Carroll's artwork. For additional features, it includes `"Alice" on the Stage' an article which Lewis Carroll wrote after seeing a production of the stage version, and it includes preface's to the books which Lewis Carroll wrote in 1896 for the 1897 editions. There are wonderful notes for both books, and a very informative introduction by Hugh Haughton.
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45 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A delightful reading, appeals to all ages 3 Oct. 2001
I read the original text of Carroll's masterpiece when I was 18 years old (I'm 22 now). I knew only interpretations made by Russian writers before. They were funny but not comparable to the original. So I enjoyed myself from the first page of Alice's Adventures In Wonderland to the last of Through The Looking Glass. The book is so brilliant, full of clever humor, paradoxes and parodies. The so-called "nonsense" is very amusing and by no means without sense. Of course I sometimes missed meanings of Carroll's parodies and allusions. Later I read different references and explanations. The searching of meaning made the book even more interesting in my eyes. There is no need in mentioning characters of both books for they are widely known, but I can't stand the temptation. First of all - Alice herself. She is such a charming and sensible young lady. I laughed a lot at her thoughts and commentaries to the events. And then White Rabbit, Mad Hatter, March Hare, Caterpillar, Cheshire Cat, Mock Turtle, strange birds, the intelligent Mouse, Tweedledee and Tweedledum, Humpty Dumpty, Duchess, King and Queen of Hearts, etc - they are creations of true genius. I also liked immensely Carroll's poems included in the books. I often notice that I am repeating lines from them. As for my favourite The Walrus And The Carpenter, I know it by heart. Wit, fantasy and magic make Alice's Adventures a superb children's book as well as a source of great pleasure for adults. Classical illustrations add more charm to this addition. I prefer them to more modern images (by Disney for example).
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33 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure genius 27 Sept. 2006
These are two of the greatest books ever written. They are, of course, not nonsense. They may have been written for children, but their appeal to any reasonably perceptive adult is so intense that those who have fallen under their spell can practically recite the entire texts of both. In fact, they constitute profoundly penetrating statements, or summaries, of the human condition: physical in Wonderland, and intellectual in Looking-Glass. They do not ramble. Every word, every incident, has been chosen with the utmost precision. Tenniel's illustrations are inspired perfection, and the result of prolonged and dedicated collaboration between author and artist. They will never be improved upon, although many have attempted to replace them with their own images. Wonderland is, in effect, an analysis of the significance and sensations of growth and discovery in the development of a human being, advancing from childhood into adolescence. Starting with the trauma of birth, it describes the experience of adjustment to the world of adults, but succeeds nevertheless in demonstrating that adult society is nothing but a construction of charades --- a house of cards. Looking-Glass raises perennial philosophical questions, such as what is reality? what do words actually mean? what is the nature of time, and identity? Does the world consist of as much anti-matter as matter? It is an extraordinarily compressed summary of the riddles of thought and existence. These works are absolute masterpieces of writing: two of the most sophisticated productions ever penned during the late Victorian era. At the same time they are uniquely readable, witty and amusing.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
By Ratty
Not all, if any, of these reviews are about this particular edition of this book. Amazon as lumped all reviews for this tittle together regardless of which edition it is. Weather it's hardback, paperback, audio cd, kindle or whatever it's all the same to Amazon. So you might think your reading a review for a paperback when the reviewer's writer is discussing an expensive delux hardback, or you might think you are reading a review for a collectors edition hardback when the reviewer is telling you how bad the illustrations are on their kindle edition. Someone maybe saying how much they think as be cut out from the original but they are talking about their Auto CD copy when you are looking at a library edition. I came here specifically for a hardback Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass with the famous illustrations. Of the seven hundred supposed reviews I have not found one that I can honestly and reliably attribute to this edition. So before you make a judgement based on what you read, make shore what you read really applies to what you think it applies to and not something else with the same tittle or a different edition of the same tittle .
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