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Alice In Chains
 
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Alice In Chains

1 Jan 2001 | Format: MP3

4.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
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4:44
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3:22
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7:12
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5:27
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6:28
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4:05
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5:35
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4:08
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2:45
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5:40
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8:18
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7:03


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 3 Nov 1995
  • Release Date: 3 Nov 1995
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:04:47
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001I8744S
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 13,338 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Tom Chase VINE VOICE on 25 Dec 2006
Format: Audio CD
After creating a surge of fine albums in the 90s with the almost perfect tour-de-force of grunge - 1992's "Dirt" - and one of the most touching EPs I've ever heard - 1994's "Jar of Flies" - AIC's final output before Staley's death was this self-titled album, AKA "Tripod".

"Tripod" never really got the acclaim akin to "Dirt", although certain tracks got a deal of airtime such as the dingy Heaven Beside You, it is rather underrated in the grunge era. However, I feel it does lack the consistency of "Dirt" and at times feels a little bloated, but then it also contains some of AIC's finest work and has a very unique eerie feel to it, as it is the final works before the tragedy.

The opening two tracks kick things off in typical AIC grunge style. Grind has a menacing sluggish riff combined with an infectious chorus melody, a trademark of AIC at their best, and Brush Away is probably my favorite of the more straightforward rockers on the album with its stellar guitar interplaying from Cantrell and Staley's desperate cries of `I gotta get away...And brush away loose ground'. The vibes of anguish and depression are continued and multiplied tenfold by the punishing Sludge Factory, which feels like, well...sludge. This is the pinnacle of the album, and definitely up there with AIC's best achievements. The band bludgeon their way through the 7 minute entirety with huge walls of down-tuned guitars and one of Staley's best ever performances, his delivery is full of such deep frustration and anguish it is genuinely touching.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By EasternNathCult on 10 July 2009
Format: Audio CD
DARK. BROODING. EVIL.

This is Alice's most complex and atmospheric album and my personal favourite.

Songs such as the opener, 'Grind' and 'Sludge Factory' will melt your face, whereas as the haunting 'Head Creeps' (one of AIC's best!) and 'Frogs' just leaving you feeling uneasy and, in my opinion, this is when Alice In Chains are at their very best.

I can see how people could find it inaccessable; there aren't any 3 minute headbangers on here, but give it a chance to sink in - this one's a MONSTER.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "blacktooooooooth" on 5 Jan 2001
Format: Audio CD
Alice In Chains have come a long way since the 1990 Facelift. Every album by these amazingly talented 4 men from Seattle gets better than the last. Dirt (1992) in my view is probably one of THE best rock albums yet. AIC are very hard to classify, i suppose they could be called grunge as they are part of the small group of bands from Seattle that are grunge. These are Nirvana, Soundgarden, Stone Temple Pilots, and so on. Layne Staley can do things with his voice that most vocalists would kill for. He is a great singer and has so much emotion, he gets this accross very well. Jerry Cantrell's riffs are just amazing and have the tone and quality that only AIC can give. Mike Starr and later Mike Inez (recently in Slash's snakepit) are both unbelievable bassists. Then there is Sean Kinney on drums who is just one of the best technical drummers around. This album, nicknamed TRIPOD for obvious reasons has the best collection of songs ranging from all areas of the bands Pshyche. From dark songs to light half-comedy songs. "Heaven Beside You" and "Grind" are the real stand out tracks, but the album as a whole cannot be beaten. This is the most expressive and also the last studio album alice did before they stopped recording (for now). My choice would be buy now ask questions later.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. Jenkins on 5 Nov 2009
Format: Audio CD
Alice were always about dark, but the Tripod album is a strong contender for their most bleakly disorientating of all. Musically it captures the dissonant landscape of a damaged psyche perhaps even better than Dirt's howl of rage or Jar of Flies late night solitude. Like a good David Lynch film or Kafka story it takes you to places simultaneously fascinating and repulsive, oblique and captivating.

For starters, Grind immediately reasserts their ability to write a thunderous, hooky rock track. Brush Away is similarly face-melting. From there, however, things become more complex. Much of the album is weird, trippy, and bordering on the psychedelic. Sludge Factory progresses from a punishing downtuned riff to what sounds like Jerry Cantrell playing a solo on a guitar with slack, loosened strings, to Layne Staley reciting a muddle of non-sequiters in the voice of a robot. By the time it's seven minutes are up, you start to suspect someone might have sipped something into your drink. Similarly, after 8 minutes of stark acoustic picking and seasick guitar lines, Frogs ends with Staley murmuring and shouting like a man laid out after ingesting one too many questionable substances, over a nest of guitar and feedback.

Heaven Beside You and Over Now take a cue from the bands two excellent acoustic eps, and are starkly intimate and raw. Again and Nothin' Song make full use of the bizarre, shiver inducing harmonics with which the band pepper their louder than hell riffage. Shame in You is epic, and one of my favourite songs by the band.

Staley was apparently severely struggling with drugs by this stage, and Cantrell steps in on lead vocals on several tracks. But when Staley does appear, his commitment seems without question.
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