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Algorithms for Image Processing and Computer Vision Paperback – 5 Dec 1996


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Product details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons; Pap/Cdr edition (5 Dec. 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471140562
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471140566
  • Product Dimensions: 18.8 x 2.3 x 23.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,056,636 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From the Back Cover

A cookbook of the hottest new algorithms and cutting–edge techniques in image processing and computer vision

This amazing book/CD package puts the power of all the hottest new image processing techniques and algorithms in your hands. Based on J. R. Parker′s exhaustive survey of Internet newsgroups worldwide, Algorithms for Image Processing and Computer Vision answers the most frequently asked questions with practical solutions.

Parker uses dozens of real–life examples taken from fields such as robotics, space exploration, forensic analysis, cartography, and medical diagnostics, to clearly describe the latest techniques for morphing, advanced edge detection, wavelets, texture classification, image restoration, symbol recognition, and genetic algorithms, to name just a few. And, best of all, he implements each method covered in C and provides all the source code on the CD.

For the first time, you′re rescued from the hours of mind–numbing mathematical calculations it would ordinarily take to program these state–of–the–art image processing capabilities into software. At last, nonmathematicians get all the shortcuts they need for sophisticated image recognition and processing applications.

On the CD–ROM you′ll find:
∗ Complete code for examples in the book
∗ A gallery of images illustrating the results of advanced techniques
∗ A free GNU compiler that lets you run source code on any platform
∗ A system for restoring damaged or blurred images
∗ A genetic algorithms package

About the Author

J.R.PARKER is a professor of computer science at the University of Calgary specializing in image processing and computer vision. He is also a principal in the consulting firm of Becker, Parker & Associates where he specializes in forensic applications of image processing.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Edge detection is one of the most commonly used operations in image analysis, and there are probably more algorithms in the literature for enhancing and detecting edges than for any other single subject. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Mar. 1999
Format: Paperback
At its best, this book is a wonderful cookbook of image processing techniques. For example the author's presentation of the Canny and Shen-Castan methods of edge detection is clear and detailed. Full C source is provided for this and all the other techniques discussed in the book. The book does not pretend to be a basic introduction to image processing -- if you do not have Castleman or Pratt or sometimg similar on your bookshelf, you probably should not start by acquiring this book. A possible source of irritation for some readers will be the variation in depth of coverage of topics. For example, when the author discusses wavelets, the coverage is very scant and qualitative. It is well done, but quite different in kind from the aforementioned coverage of advanced edge detection techniques. Similarly, the author will cover specific aspects of image processing, such as motion blur for an image, in the context of a rather general discussion of image restoration. In short, the book seems to reflect the author's interests more than attempting to be an objective coverage of the current state of the art in image processing. Nonetheless, the high quality of the information that the author provides and the bibliography to further coverage of the given topics are well worth the price of the book. You just need to approach it on the author's terms rather than on a preconceived notion of what you should get out of the book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 Mar. 1999
Format: Paperback
A very good "imaging recipes" book. includes solutions to various IP/Vision problems ranging from low-level edge detection to high-level character recognition. Most of the algorithms are not presented in older books, which makes it a valueble source which replaces the tedious search through individual articles. Written in an "application oriented" approach, with lots of code snippets.
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1 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 23 Mar. 1999
Format: Paperback
Um otimo livro. Atende as expectativas teoricas e de implementacao. Os exemplos encontram-se um linguagem C. A biblioteca de algoritmos idealizada preve a utilizacao do compilador C GNU. Mas, com poucas modificacoes pode-se utilizar estes algoritmos para outros compiladores. Recomendo este livro para estudantes de graduacao como acompanhamento de disciplinas de processamento de imagens, os quais, como eu, geralmente anseiam por ver realizadas as explanacoes teoricas.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 11 reviews
29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
Excellent cook book of advanced IP techniques 22 Mar. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
At its best, this book is a wonderful cookbook of image processing techniques. For example the author's presentation of the Canny and Shen-Castan methods of edge detection is clear and detailed. Full C source is provided for this and all the other techniques discussed in the book. The book does not pretend to be a basic introduction to image processing -- if you do not have Castleman or Pratt or something similar on your bookshelf, you probably should not start by acquiring this book. A possible source of irritation for some readers will be the variation in depth of coverage of topics. For example, when the author discusses wavelets, the coverage is very scant and qualitative. It is well done, but quite different in kind from the aforementioned coverage of advanced edge detection techniques. Similarly, the author will cover specific aspects of image processing, such as motion blur for an image, in the context of a rather general discussion of image restoration. In short, the book seems to reflect the author's interests more than attempting to be an objective coverage of the current state of the art in image processing. Nonetheless, the high quality of the information that the author provides and the bibliography to further coverage of the given topics are well worth the price of the book. You just need to approach it on the author's terms rather than on a preconceived notion of what you should get out of the book.
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Outstanding source of implementations of image processing algorithms 10 Mar. 2006
By calvinnme - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is a great source of code for the implementations of common and not so common algorithms used in image processing and computer vision. It is not meant to be a textbook on either subject. For that I suggest you turn to "Digital Image Processing" by Gonzalez and Woods for the subject of image processing and to "Computer Vision" by Linda Shapiro for computer vision.

The book starts out with the treatment of a common subject - edge detection - and provides code for various edge detectors including Canny, Shen-Casten, and Marr-Hildreth.

Chapter 2 does a pretty good job of explaining digital morphology, the various operations, and their uses.

Chapter 3 has a very brief introduction to gray-level segmentation, and then jumps into more advanced topics such as the method of iterative selection, entropy, fuzzy logic methods, and the method of Chow and Kaneko, among others. Most of the methods here are somewhat mathematically involved, and the author does a pretty good job of explaining the mathematics and showing resulting images that show the strengths of each method.

Chapter 4 is about the calculation and use of texture in image processing and computer vision. Again, the mathematics here can get involved and equations and illustrations are included to help make the concepts clear. Even fractal geometry and its use in texture is very briefly mentioned.

Chapter 5 is one of my favorites, since it covers the topic of skeletonization, which is not commonly covered in most vision or image processing books. The most common method is mentioned first - that of the medial axis transform. This is followed by a discussion of iterative morphological methods and also the use of contours. Finally, the chapter is rounded out with an explanation of the Zhang-Suen/Stentiford/Holt combined method and accompanying code. This method usually produces the best combination of good visual results and computational efficiency.

In Chapter 6, on image restoration, the author moves to the frequency domain and discusses the Fourier Transform, the FFT, and their uses in image restoration. The author provides his own image restoration system, the Eagle Restoration System, complete with code.

Chapter 7, on wavelets, is a very brief and not too satisfying introduction to the topic. The author does provide some mathematics and some code for some basic transforms, but does not provide much in the way of motivation.

Chapters 8 and 9, on optical character recognition and symbol recognition respectively, are two very good chapters on this subject. It provides the simple introductory information on recognizing printed alphabetic characters. It also talks about skew detection in the case of slanted lines of text. Chapter 9 expands the concepts with a very good section on neural networks and character recognition concluding with a system that recognizes printed music.

Chapter 10, the final chapter of the book, was an OK introduction to genetic algorithms and evolutionary computing. However, like the chapter on wavelets, I found it a bit thin.

The appendix contains a listing of all of the C code included on the CD and each program's purpose. Going through the individual programs was, for me, almost as educational as reading the book, since the code is very well laid out and commented. I highly recommend this book to individuals looking for implementations and discussions of certain image processing and computer vision algorithms.
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
A great "Imaging Recipes" book 10 Mar. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A very good "imaging recipes" book. includes solutions to various IP/Vision problems ranging from low-level edge detection to high-level character recognition. Most of the algorithms are not presented in older books, which makes it a valueble source which replaces the tedious search through individual articles. Written in an "application oriented" approach, with lots of code snippets.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
An unusually clear book -- and great for OCR researchers. 6 May 2006
By Golan Levin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This nifty book is unusual in several respects: it is written in an extremely clear and simple style; it presents good clear code, both in print and on the accompanying CD; and it presents a variety of different methods for achieving each given goal. For example, the book presents a half-dozen different algorithms (usually with code) for edge-detection, for thresholding, and for skeletonization. For the most part, the book does a good job of explaining the relative merits or suitabilities of the different algorithms.

It's important to say, though, that this book is not a comprehensive introduction to image processing issues and algorithms (such as Gonzales&Woods), nor is it a soup-to-nuts cookbook of code (such as Myler&Weeks' admittedly dated "Pocket Handbook"). Although the book is written in a style that students could understand, I wouldn't recommend it as a first book for novice students. It would be better suited to a non-specialist who nevertheless needs to accomplish something specific -- like thresholding or edge-detection -- in short order, and with an algorithm that's tuned to their particular application.

One last thing: this book will be VERY MUCH appreciated by anyone seeking a foundation in optical character recognition.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Good book; somewhat sloppy code 9 April 2008
By A. Nikiforov - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Clear and simple book, goes right to the guts. One minus is sloppy code. It's written by a scientist who is not a programmer. Implementations are slow and sometimes inaccurate. For example, function nays8 counts 0's in one thinning algorithm. Function snays count 0's in another thinnnig algorithm, while nays8 now count 1's!
Most of these comes from straightforward implementation of ideas. Sure enough, exactly this makes his code a good starting point in writing more effective programs.
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