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Aleister Crowley's Illustrated Goetia [Paperback]

Christopher S. Hyatt , Lon Milo DuQuette , David P. Wilson
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: New Falcon Publications,U.S.; New edition edition (1 April 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1561840483
  • ISBN-13: 978-1561840489
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 13.6 x 20.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 373,296 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Synopsis

"Goetia [refers to] all the operations of that Magick which deals with gross, malignant or unenlightened forces". Goetia is sometimes thought of as a wild card, something that can get out of control, something which expresses the operator's lower desires to control others and improve his own personal life. And, in fact, this potential loss of control, this danger, the desire for self improvement and great power is exactly what attracts many people to Goetia while horrifying and repelling others. Crowley's Goetia is brought to life with vivid illustrations of the demons. Commentary by DuQuette and Hyatt bring the ancient arts into the modern day.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
The purpose of this section is to stimulate, through metaphor and analogy, an understanding of Goetic operations and the concept of Evil. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars CROWLEY-DUQUETTE-HYATT, an Unholy Trinity 4 April 2002
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Aleister Crowley was called a black magician and the "wickedest man in the world." He was also called a holy-man, prophet, and Logos of the Aeon. In either case, he was the most brilliant and prolific philosopher magicians of the 20th Century. His greatest failing (if you can call it a failing) was the fact that he wrote as if he expected his readers were as educated, brilliant, and insightful as he. (He also mistakenly thought they could all figure out when he was kidding.)
I'm no dummy, and it took me several years, lots of reference books, and a good deal of spiritual courage before I could begin to appreciate Crowley and his works. Helping to light my way through the dark tangles of Crowleyana were two books that were amazingly easy to understand, THE ENOCHIAN WORLD OF ALEISTER CROWLEY, and ALEISTER CROWLEY'S ILLUSTRATED GOETIA. These little gems were written with the expressed purpose of making Crowley's works on Enochian and Goetic magick comprehensible and usable.
I don't know what gods conspired to bring Lon Milo Duquette and Christopher S. Hyatt, Ph.D together as a writing team, but I thank them. Both these gentlemen are prolific authors and famous in their own right, (just search their names on Amazon.com). Together with Crowley, however, they become an Unholy Trinity of modern magick.
If you would actually like to perform magick instead of just reading about it, read both these little books now. Do I sound impressed? I am.
-- R.D. Potter
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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Goetic version of 'Enochian Sex Magick' 22 April 2001
Format:Paperback
When people think of a magician standing within a circle commanding demons then they are thinking of the 'goetia'. It is one of the most feared and most powerful systems of magic availably to the modern sorcerer. Unfortunately the original manuscripts describe operations that would be almost impossible for the modern day magician to carry out. The need for long journey's in order to find 'magical ingredients' and vast wealth being just two of the prerequisites. The fact is that many of these instructions were given as red herrings to put off the unsuitable. This new edition gets rid of all that is unnecessary, updates the archaic language, and shows us that the system can be used outside of it's judeo-christian roots. The best thing about this book is however the strong sense that the authors have used the system and that it works!! They describe a time when a goetic evocation was performed in a son's bedroom while their wife and kids sat watching T.V. It is this down to earth approach that makes the book even more accessible to the modern magician. The only downsides being that they felt the need to use Crowley's name to help sell the book and that the title implies 'sexual evocation' on which there is only one chapter. Overall, though, it is a very good book that does for the geotia what 'Enochian Sex Magick' (by the same authors) does for the Enochian system.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great content wise, if misleading.... 25 Mar 2010
Format:Paperback
I really enjoyed this book; I think it sets out the information such as types of metals or times of day etc. etc. in a better way than the more 'classic' Goetia versions, and yes, it's nice that it's illustrated all the way through (even if a lot of the spirits look the same). The chapters that are new, e.g. accounts of past workings are interesting and well written, and help bring the text to life a little more than previous editions. Alternative calls are given for summoning which are helpful for those who are put off by the long, long, long, long evocations in older texts. The idea that somehow the book is about sex magick is frankly ridiculous though; it has three pages that touch on sex. I still give the book five stars simply because I enjoyed reading it a lot, and honestly couldn't care less that it doesn't cover anything profound concerning sex magick; it just doesn't matter. If you're thinking about buying this edition of the Goetia because it covers sexual evocation, just don't; you will be wasting your money. For anyone who simply wants a more modern, workable copy of the Goetia, then I'd recommend this book without reservation.
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1 of 18 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Uh? 6 May 2005
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
When I bought this book, I thought it would have all the answers. It doesn't. It is just Aliester Crowley's work recycled. It is full of uselss information about 'spirits.' DO NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  31 reviews
34 of 36 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Based on Crowley's Goetia... 1 Feb 2004
By Psyche - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
`What Goetia is - is the releasing of yourself from your won fears and illusions by direct confrontation.' (pg 10)
According to tradition, the Goetia is the first book in the <I>Lemegaton</I> attributed to Solomon the King, though likely compiled by a host of authors. Goetic evocation deals with the summoning of the seventy-two lesser spirits and demons. In this edition, based on Crowley's <I>Goetia</I>, DuQuette and Hyatt strip away all unnecessary trappings and cut through most of the `fooltraps' designed to dissuade less astute practitioners.
Traditionally, Goetic evocation calls for strict observance of many details, such as the correct ritual hours, lengthy calls, and an inordinate amount of ceremonial trappings. The authors tell the reader what one can safely do away with, and what can be altered as preference dictates. However, there are some items that the authors do believe are required for the successful (and safer) evocation of the Goetic spirits, including a list of `must haves' with detailed explanations and personal anecdotes as to why they are necessary. Noting `that there is absolutely no necessity (nor particular advantage) to blindly conforming with the Conjuration scripts of the ancient texts. The Spirits are no more impressed of you say "thee" and "thine" than they are if you say "you" and "yours".' (pg 45)
Goetic spirits `will work for anyone who knows how to use them. This is one of the horrors people attribute to Goetic workings. You "don't have to be respectable" for Goetia to work for you. Unlike other magical workings there is no implication that the operator has to be "good" and "holy" to achieve results. This idea in itself violates our model of "right" and "wrong", "just" and "unjust". In the Goetic world like in the real world the "bad" can and do prosper. Thus our belief in the moral orders of the Universe appears violated by the simple existence of Spirits who will do the bidding of anyone.' (pg 14)
Though they will work for anyone, the authors caution that one `must be completely convinced that your demands are absolutely justified. (And don't think we are invoking the great demon "morality" here. An <I>unnecessary</I> motive is an <I>unworthy</I> motive - pure and simple). When you are truly justified in your demands then you have the momentum of the entire universe behind you.' (pg 37)
Further cautioning and confirming that `yes, they are dangerous,' DuQuette and Hyatt explain that `while they remain unmastered they can surface unbidden and wreak all havoc modern psychology blames on "things hidden in the subconscious mind".' (pg 24) As well as a few delightfully thrilling personal anecdotes.
There are a few changes, namely the elimination of lengthy calls in preference for Thelemic invocations from <I>Liber Samech</I> by Crowley, Enochian calls, etc. As well, `for the convenience of the modern reader' the authors have translated information regarding each of the seventy-two Goetic spirits into modern understanding and Crowleyan associations, and `where obvious, returned certain Spirits to their original gender.' (pg 43)
Sketches accompany each of the seventy-two spirits, illustrated by artist-clairvoyant David P. Wilson, a practicing Goetic magickian. `Over a period of 15 years, he has evoked each of the Spirits at least once...But it is very important for you to remember that, because no two people have the same visual-emotional "vocabulary", the images of the Goetic universe will be unique to each of us.' The authors caution the reader not to `think that these sketches are what you <I>must</I> see when evoking any particular Spirit,' instead explaining that `they are intended to serve only as springboards to your imagination.' (pg 72)
Though with such a short section on sex magick, I don't know that it really deserves the `Sexual Evocation' subtitle as there are really only a few pages on it at the rear of the text.
Aimed at those actually interested in actually practicing magick rather than simply reading about it, it gives unambiguous description of what tools are required and the methods of evocation and, briefly, of sexual invocation, cutting through the superfluous and get right to what is necessary. An excellent introduction to Goetic magick as Crowley practiced it.
34 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars CROWLEY-DUQUETTE-HYATT, an Unholy Trinity 11 Jan 2002
By Renus Hyena - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Aleister Crowley was called a black magician and the "wickedest man in the world." He was also called a holy-man, prophet, and Logos of the Aeon. In either case, he was the most brilliant and prolific philosopher magicians of the 20th Century. His greatest failing (if you can call it a failing) was the fact that he wrote as if he expected his readers were as educated, brilliant, and insightful as he. (He also mistakenly thought they could all figure out when he was kidding.)
I'm no dummy, and it took me several years, lots of reference books, and a good deal of spiritual courage before I could begin to appreciate Crowley and his works. Helping to light my way through the dark tangles of Crowleyana were two books that were amazingly easy to understand, THE ENOCHIAN WORLD OF ALEISTER CROWLEY, and ALEISTER CROWLEY'S ILLUSTRATED GOETIA. These little gems were written with the expressed purpose of making Crowley's works on Enochian and Goetic magick comprehensible and usable.
I don't know what gods conspired to bring Lon Milo Duquette and Christopher S. Hyatt, Ph.D together as a writing team, but I thank them. Both these gentlemen are prolific authors and famous in their own right, (just search their names on Amazon.com). Together with Crowley, however, they become an Unholy Trinity of modern magick.
If you would actually like to perform magick instead of just reading about it, read both these little books now. Do I sound impressed? I am.
25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very dissapointing 20 Jun 2005
By R. Todish - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I bought this book here on Amazon because of its cover and description but had I thumbed through its pages in a bookstore then I never would have bought it.

144 pages of its 236 total pages are very primitive illustrations and the seal of the individual spirit. Even those only take up half a page each. I would say that well over 60% of this book is just padding.

Other than the few pages that describe the evocation of Orobas I would say that this book stinks and that there is nothing new or useful in it for anybody who has any of the key of solomon texts.
15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars if you are interested in this book, you may want to know... 3 Sep 2004
By the magician - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
that i have found a couple of questionable things.
1. Lon Milo's orobas' account in this book is a tad different from what he says in his "My life with the Spirits" book and although Lon himself has admitted to being a faulty and possible irresponsible person, and given the fact that he is still trying to make a point, i being the "detail fiend" find that questionable.
I mean if you're telling me a story to explain something but your examples of an account, differs each time it is told, how can I trust your accountability?
--"HOLD ON!!" some LMD lovers would say-
-wait there's more-
I also found that the sigils in this book is a tad different from the sigils out of my copy of the Goetia (Aleister's original notes) and that leads me to wonder if there is an actual guideline for performing things or is there a, "as long as you get the general idea of the thing; just do it" kind of approach.<- is it really a case of "do what thou wilt?"
In this work, we (newbies) don't have an actual older, experienced person that we can learn from and everything that we do we must discern (Malkuth helps) and judge for ourselves and eventhough that is okay by my terms, you still don't want to have "off" information when dealing with something as powerful and dangerous as this!
(Moving On)
Although, I am currently not familiar with all the 72 descriptions of these beings by my Solomon/Crowley Goetia (so I can compare), I do find that the descriptions in this book has similiarities such as, you will find that some or most of these creatures are described to have lion faces, gryphon wings, or have crow heads-which I find suspect.
Now I have not (and I repeat)have not done a goetic evocation and since this book is currently out of stock it only tells me that there are alot of people in this world of ours who want the power to make things happen.
I mean I have been looking at this book and the reviews on here a long time before considering to buy it and until recently waldenbooks have put a "look inside this book" option and eventhough this store is so busy that they probably just got around to this book, I still think that they put that "look inside" option there because this book is a hot little item.
Like I've said, people are in dire need to change their lives and are probably willing to go through hell to achieve what they want. So if you are reading my review to judge for yourself, I feel responsible to tell you that this book (for the most part)has detailed information as to what to do and what not to do written in an "up to date" sense.
And the drawings that describe all of the demons in here (by David P. Wilson) are great (I don't know why Lon didn't use him for his ceremonial tarot deck and no, I do not hate Lon) and that about does her.
Due to what I have found fautly or questionable is why I am giving this book 3 stars.
And I will say to you (dear friend)in this game of will and manifestation, you are your best judge and deliverer and you alone is responsible for what you get back.
Take care
33 of 43 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Five of Cups: Disappointment: The water of stagnation... 16 Sep 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I just bought this book from Amazon and I am really disappointed in it. A part of what drew me to Goetic work was an odd series of events which revolved around some of the classical depictions of the Goetic Demons.
The 'illustrations' in this book are something equivalent to the fantasies of the typical junior high student. Rough scribbles in pen and ink that show little talent, and likely no familiarity with the spirits themselves. While the traditional depictions bring forth the elegance and regality of the spirits, the illustrations in this book come off leaving one with an uninspired comic book to work with. I also compared the traditional sigils with those drawn in this book, and found that many of them in this book were missing details, certain lines and circles throughout. It has been my personal belief to approach spirits with honor and accuracy, neither of which are present here.
The evocational text is written that of a Crowleyian flavor, calling upon Ra-Hoor-Khuit, Osiris, etcetera as has also been altered from the original Goetic texts. Thus I would only recommend this book for use by Crowley's fans and followers, and anyone with the wisdom to use the traditional texts, sigils and illustrations can easily find them on the web, which can be copied to your own grimoire.
Sex sells, and that is the only reason it is mentioned in the title of this book. The actual section covering sex magick is only three pages at the end of the book. This is the same marketing scam used in Enochian Sex Magic put together by the same group of people.
While some of Hyatt's and DuQuette's essays are amusing, they by no means warrant purchasing this book.
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