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Albert Camus, Une Vie (French) Mass Market Paperback – 23 Sep 1999


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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Gallimard (23 Sep 1999)
  • Language: French
  • ISBN-10: 2070410625
  • ISBN-13: 978-2070410620
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 5.4 x 18.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,406,312 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Luc REYNAERT TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 23 April 2014
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Olivier Todd paints in this fascinating biography a portrait in flesh and blood of Albert Camus, of his public as well as his private life.
His private life was one long struggle against illness (tuberculosis) and, in his early years, against poverty. His public life was a long battle for his own generous ideas, for his art and against the ideological and material terrorisms of his opponents and enemies.
For Albert Camus, in a life of an honest human being acts and ideas must match each other.

Ideas
The philosophy of Albert Camus can be summarized in three words: freedom, justice and rebellion.
The absurdity of life ('The Myth of Sisyphus') becomes for him a force: each person has now the freedom to give a sense to the world in the way he wants it. For Albert Camus, this freedom means in politics democratic pluralism and in economics collectivism. This freedom also implies necessarily revolts against all kinds of injustice in the world, against totalitarianism and authoritarianism, including religion ('The Plague') and against world domination by the Money powers.

Ferocious enemies
As a journalist (‘a historian of current affairs’ – P. Nizan), Albert Camus fought against 'official' sabotage (not enough paper to print his newspaper) and censorship.
As a novelist and essayist, he was the subject of ignominious attacks from both the Right (R. Nimier: we will not go to war with the lungs of M. Camus) and the Left (S. de Beauvoir’s ‘The Mandarins’ is an exercise in relentless Camus-bashing). Albert Camus suffered emotionally heavily under these attacks damning Paris as a city full of infamy and systematic lies.

Current relevance
Albert Camus battles are today more significant than ever.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
Battles of a humanist 23 April 2014
By Luc REYNAERT - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Olivier Todd paints in this fascinating biography a portrait in flesh and blood of Albert Camus, of his public as well as his private life.
His private life was one long struggle against illness (tuberculosis) and, in his early years, against poverty. His public life was a long battle for his own generous ideas, for his art and against the ideological and material terrorisms of his opponents and enemies.
For Albert Camus, in a life of an honest human being acts and ideas must match each other.

Ideas
The philosophy of Albert Camus can be summarized in three words: freedom, justice and rebellion.
The absurdity of life ('The Myth of Sisyphus') becomes for him a force: each person has now the freedom to give a sense to the world in the way he wants it. For Albert Camus, this freedom means in politics democratic pluralism and in economics collectivism. This freedom also implies necessarily revolts against all kinds of injustice in the world, against totalitarianism and authoritarianism, including religion ('The Plague') and against world domination by the Money powers.

Ferocious enemies
As a journalist (‘a historian of current affairs’ – P. Nizan), Albert Camus fought against 'official' sabotage (not enough paper to print his newspaper) and censorship.
As a novelist and essayist, he was the subject of ignominious attacks from both the Right (R. Nimier: we will not go to war with the lungs of M. Camus) and the Left (S. de Beauvoir’s ‘The Mandarins’ is an exercise in relentless Camus-bashing). Albert Camus suffered emotionally heavily under these attacks damning Paris as a city full of infamy and systematic lies.

Current relevance
Albert Camus battles are today more significant than ever. He was truly a free journalist, not a gagged one by the Money forces (the owners of the media conglomerates). Where are the Albert Camus of today?
Philosophically, he fought for peace and true democracy against all kinds of political, economic or social domination, against all ideological terrorism.
In our Orwellian world full of false or biased interested prophets, Albert Camus is indeed a dangerous classic author.

Before reading this remarkable biography, I would recommend to read first some works of Albert Camus: in the philosophical field, 'The Myth of Sisyphus' and in literary field, his novels 'The Outsider' and/or 'The First Man’.
This generous book about one of the greatest writers of the 20th century should be read by all men and women of good will.
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