Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now
Alan Turing: The Enigma and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £10.99
  • You Save: £2.70 (25%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Alan Turing: The Enigma has been added to your Basket
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good items may show signs of prior usage and have cover and corners worn, but items is in good overall condition inside and out. May contain stickers/stamps or previous owners name. For detailed description please contact seller. UK standard delivery is 3-12 working days. Please note that we do not process orders on the weekend or on national holidays. UK standard delivery for all items (excluding Fulfilled by Amazon) is 3-12 working days. We now ship international. (Please be aware that all deliveries are made by third party carriers and dates shown are estimations based on their delivery schedules. By placing a bid or offer you automatically accept the terms of this delivery).
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Alan Turing: The Enigma Paperback – 5 Mar 1992

248 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 5 Mar 1992
£8.29
£5.11 £0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£8.29 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save £20 on Amazon.co.uk with the aqua Classic card. Get an initial credit line of £250-£1,200 and build your credit rating. Representative 32.9% APR (variable). Subject to term and conditions. Learn more.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Alan Turing: The Enigma
  • +
  • The Secret Life of Bletchley Park: The History of the Wartime Codebreaking Centre by the Men and Women Who Were There
  • +
  • The Secrets of Station X: How the Bletchley Park codebreakers helped win the war (Dialogue Espionage Classics)
Total price: £24.57
Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Paperback: 768 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; New Ed edition (5 Mar. 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099116413
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099116417
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 4 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (248 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 56,797 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"One of the finest scientific biographies I’ve ever read: authoritative, superbly researched, deeply sympathetic and beautifully told" (Sylvia Nasar, author of A Beautiful Mind)

"Andrew Hodges' book is of exemplary scholarship and sympathy. Intimate, perceptive and insightful, it’s also the most readable biography I’ve picked up in some time" (Time Out)

"A first-rate presentation of the life of a first-rate scientific mind" (New York Times Book Review)

"One of the finest scientific biographies ever written" (New Yorker)

"A first-rate presentation of the life of a first-rate scientific mind…it is hard to imagine a more thoughtful and warm biography than this one" (Douglas Hofstadter New York Times Book Review)

Book Description

The full story behind the persecuted genius of wartime codebreaking and the computer revolution - now an Oscar-winning film starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley

See all Product Description

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Silver Surfer TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 20 April 2014
Format: Paperback
This is a lengthy book and, unfortunately, not the easiest on the reader. It is a story of brilliance intermixed with moments of tragedy and success, all of which contributed towards Turing's personality.

Essentially, Turing was a mathematician who was found to have a talent for solving complex mathematical problems, a talent much needed at the critical point just before WWII and during it. For the reader it is not necessary to understand the mathematics in order to help understand the man. Unfortunately the writer appears also to be a mathematician who deems it necessary to delve into the principles of the complex equations needed to solve the Enigma problem. These complicate the book and the story within.

I had tried to read this book on more than a single instance and each time I get a little further but the central portion is the most complex and seems insurmountable, thanks to the maths. I had previously read other authors' attempts at Turing's story, some possibly pre-dating the 1970's release of the Enigma secret and without the mathematic content, which made them easier to understand Turing's life and lifestyle choices.

This is probably the most complete telling of Turing's life, but certainly not the easiest for many potential readers. It may incidentally interest those studying mathematics at degree or higher levels.
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
76 of 79 people found the following review helpful By Ariadne Tampion on 12 May 2010
Format: Paperback
This is an immense book; a staggeringly thorough biography; the author appears to have left no stone unturned in his search for the real man behind the 'enigma'. Alan Turing emerges as a man who was ahead of his time in his ideas of machine intelligence and his understanding of his own sexuality; but one who was paradoxically also 'born too late', for the breadth of his interests might have sat better in the Victorian era than within the twentieth century cult of the expert.

It is definitely worth reading if you can commit the necessary time and attention to it (I read it while recovering from surgery). Not only is it a thick volume with very small print, but it abounds with highly technical descriptions of Turing's work. Otherwise, wait a couple of years from the time of this review and there will no doubt be a profusion of potted biographies to celebrate Turing's centenary year in 2012.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
48 of 51 people found the following review helpful By RR Waller TOP 500 REVIEWER on 10 Dec. 2011
Format: Paperback
I cannot recall my first meeting with Alan Turing (in books) but I have been fascinated since, on two levels; firstly, Bletchley Park was so shrouded in secrecy (still seems to be to some extent) that many people do not fully appreciate the role its people played in bringing the war to an early end, with fewer lives lost. Secondly, Alan Turing's genius is still not understood by many of us who benefit from it in many ways, e.g. he pioneered computing and helped to ensure our lives are lived in our current freedom.

Excessive praise? I think not.

Having worked with gifted people at one time, I came to understand many of their differences and the difficulty some people had with them and their strange expectations of their normality while being gifted. Alan Turing suffered in similar ways. There is a clear logic in cycling with a gas mask on while suffering from and trying to prevent hay fever - after all, he was trying to crack a complex code. In a large organisation, I should imagine tea mugs annoyingly went missing all the time, especially when time wasted looking for one was lives lost. Solution? Simple - chain it to the radiator.

This is an excellent biography which sheds a great deal of light on Turing's unusual character and some of the technical issues involved in code-breaking and early computer building, both of which the author explains well.

The post-war social complexities are dealt with too, making this a fascinating book. In some ways, it helps to explain Gordon Brown's partial apology many years later; when one considers the services for which knighthoods are awarded now, it leaves one seriously wondering about some post-war decisions.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By M. D. Leith on 15 Oct. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A superb book. Good mixture of some of the maths he used in problem-solving, with personal details of the Great Man's life. One can skip the maths and 'take it as read' without detracting from the 'plot'. It shows A Turing's eccentricity well as well as his complex inner 'demons' in coping with his homosexuality. I am only half-way through as I write this, so the 'plot' has not fully worked out to its tragic end, but I am confident that the rest of the book won't disappoint!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Simon Howard on 16 Aug. 2012
Format: Paperback
This comprehensive biography is certainly detailed. It is, perhaps, the most thorough biography I've read. This allows a great insight into the character and intelligence of Turing, but it did quickly become unnecessarily dense in parts, and felt like it was veering off at a tangent by placing Turing's academic work in a wider context than was really necessary. I don't think the book needed to explain some of the mathematical concepts in quite the detail it did, nor did it need to explain in fine detail the sequelae of those concepts as discovered by others.

I was also a little uncomfortable with the degree of subjectiveness in this description of his life. Clearly, it is impossible for any biography to be written from a totally objective stand-point, but it is clear that Hodges stands in awe of Turing, and constantly tries to explain and justify anything that could be seen as a fault in him. There were times when motives and opinions seemed to have been assigned to Turing's actions without a clear explanation given as to how Hodges had derived these, which made me question their veracity. I'm also awed of Turing and think he's a giant of our age, but even I found the warmth, bordering on sycophancy, of this book a little overbearing. I think the point would have actually been made more strongly had the reader been left to draw their own conclusions from a more objective description of the events.

I was disappointed with some of the omissions of this book.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback