Agent 6 and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £7.99
  • You Save: £2.40 (30%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Agent 6 (Child 44 Trilogy... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping option on this book. Guaranteed very good quality. Used but still in excellent condition for the next owner.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Agent 6 (Child 44 Trilogy 3) Paperback – 19 Jan 2012


See all 17 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£5.59
£2.20 £0.01
£5.59 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Agent 6 (Child 44 Trilogy 3) + The Secret Speech (Child 44 Trilogy 2) + Child 44
Price For All Three: £14.17

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Ltd (19 Jan. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847396747
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847396747
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 3.4 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (128 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 848 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born in 1979 to a Swedish mother and an English father, Tom Rob Smith's bestselling novels in the Child 44 trilogy were international publishing sensations. Among its many honours, Child 44 won the International Thriller Writer Award for Best First Novel, the Galaxy Book Award for Best New Writer, the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award, and was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize and shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award and the inaugural Desmond Elliot Prize. Child 44 is now a major motion picture starring Tom Hardy, Noomi Rapace and Gary Oldman.

Product Description

Amazon Review

Tom Rob Smith’s debut novel, Child 44, was a considerable success (the youthful Smith began to collect book award nominations by the bushel, before finally bagging the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award for 2008). That book’s successor, The Secret Speech, featured the second appearance of the beleaguered former MGB officer Leo Dormidov. Hopes were high for the final volume in the trilogy – and here is Agent 6, the final outing for Leo. So does it satisfactorily conclude the sequence?

In the last book, the time was 1956; Stalin had died, and it was the time of Nikita Khrushchev’s revisionist pronouncements (such as the ‘secret speech’ of the title, in which the Stalinist regime was – for the first time – roundly denounced). Leo Dormidov, his wife Raisa and their daughters are in mortal danger again, because of the new public view of the police as criminals; Leo’s efforts to save his family plunged him into situations of fear and tension. Both books were novel of striking authority (despite the controversial stylistic notion of putting all speech in italics, so that everything appeared over-emphasised). Agent 6, the third and final outing for the conflicted former MGB officer, brings the trilogy of novels to a resounding climax. Leo’s new civilian life with his wife Raisa and his family has acquired equilibrium, but the USSR and the US are still bitter enemies. A visit to the states by Leo on a diplomatic mission has a tragic outcome, and Leo loses everything. Only the grim plains of Afghanistan offer him a way back – or death. Tom Rob Smith has utilised cinematic technique here (not to mention upping the number of suspenseful set pieces), and some will prefer the more complex character building of the first book (still the finest in the sequence), but for most readers this final Leo Dormidov novel will push all the requisite buttons. --Barry Forshaw --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

`In this final part of the trilogy (equally good as a stand-alone book), which began with much acclaimed Child 44, author Tom Rob Smith shows he has lost none of his talent for producing a perfectly paced thriller' --Books of the Year, Country & Town House

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By PZ on 10 Mar. 2014
Format: Paperback
TRS does it again.

Child 44 was excellent (but then there are so many serial-killer stories), and The Secret Speech was non-stop action (but could all this really happen to one man/family?).

I think I enjoyed Agent 6 the most. When turning the pages, I often had to use all my willpower NOT to read the bottom of the right hand pages first because I couldn't wait to find out what happened next. I resisted though, and it was worth it.

A perfect conclusion to the trilogy.

Buy it.

(Possible spoiler ahead warning!)

Nothing to do with the book itself, but I'm not sure why it's called Agent 6. I'd lay a small wager that this book had a different title until the publishers got hold of it. Simon & Schuster should certainly be ashamed of their misleading back-cover blurb, which climaxes with: "Leo will stop at nothing as he hunts down the one person who knows the truth: Agent 6. WHO IS AGENT 6?" Did whoever wrote this actually read the book? The book is 543 pages long. The first Leo even learns of the existence of Agent 6 is on Page 483! 12 pages later he knows Agent 6's real name, and 9 pages after that he confronts the man in his house. Not exactly what I'd call a hunt.

This book deserves a better marketing department than that.

Ignore the blurb, and buy it anyway.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By AmazonMonster on 11 Feb. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What I've enjoyed most about these books is that each one has taken a different approach to an extremely complicated man in often terrible circumstances. The first book was more of a procedural thriller with the added complication of being at the time of Stalin, the second then threw everything into the air by setting it against the events of the Hungarian revolution and now this sweeps us towards the more recent cold war stand off between the US and USSR before finding its way onwards to a setting that is more familiar now than many of us would prefer. Leo is our anchor through all three books and our empathy with him grows as he tries to make sense of all that has happened to him and worse, all that he has done and the consequences for those he loves. I wish my Russian history lessons at school had been like this!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Shazjera TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 5 July 2011
Format: Hardcover
I don't get to read this genre very often as it is not one I would usually buy for myself so when a proof copy arrived in the post from Simon & Schuster (via BookDagger) to review I started reading with a mixture of trepidation and excitement. Trepidation because I am not a political person at all and wondered if this would affect my perception of the story and excitement at reading a different genre.

Although this is the third book involving agent Leo Demidov it was very obvious from the beginning that I didn't have to have any previous knowledge. Leo's character is very understandable from his actions - but there is also an inference that although he is following Communist doctrine, there are underlying doubts.

At the beginning of the story the foundations are laid for how life is in the Soviet Union. We meet American singer Jesse Austin who is a Communist and is a key figure to the plot.

Fifteen years later we join Leo, his wife Raisa and their two adopted daughters on the eve before Raisa and their two daughters are leaving for America. Raisa is leading a diplomatic mission using singing as a bridge between the two countries.

On American soil we are introduced to FBI agent Jim Yates who is another central figure to the plot.

The change of events is sudden and dramatic and what follows is Leo's journey to reach America to avenge the tragedy. Along the way we spend time in Afghanistan until events conspire to get him back on track.

There are politics in the story but for me they were far outweighed by the psychological profiles of the characters we meet and the change in them as they examine their beliefs and become more humane.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By MR J S WIGGS on 21 Jan. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
For a book that starts off fast paced and really draws you in, this seemed to lack a little depth in the middle and towards the end. Still an excellent way to end a brilliant trilogy!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Adam Stokes on 11 July 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having read and enjoyed 'Child 44' immensely, I have purchased both of Tom Rob Smith's follow-ups. 'The Secret Speech' is good in itself but felt a little too desperate to come across as an 'epic' and get itself adapted into a Hollywood movie. 'Agent 6' - despite an excellent premise - feels like a TV mini-series that runs out of budget half way through. I was intrigued by the opening chapters which genuinely reel you in, but once the tragic central incident has unfolded, the brakes suddenly slam on and the book wonders around in circles for ages - particularly the scenes set in Afghanistan. It's a brave move by Smith to jump so far ahead in time, only a third of the way in but it's not altogether successful (I was reminded of a similar, equally-jarring period shift in Philip Kerr's 'The Dead Rise Not'). And most frustrating of all, the eponymous Agent 6 (around whom the book's mystery revolves) is neither mentioned nor seen until the final quarter of the book. A missed opportunity.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback