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Age of Plastic, the Import

36 customer reviews

Price: £14.18
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by samurai media JPN401.
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Frequently Bought Together

Age of Plastic, the + Adventures In Modern Recording + From A To B / Anywhere
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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Japan
  • ASIN: B000091KVQ
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on 30 July 2003
Format: Audio CD
The Buggles have their place in music history because their quirky hit "Video Killed the Radio Star" has the distinction of being the first music video shown on MTV. But their 1980 debut album "Age of Plastic" deserves to be remembered on its own terms; not just for the "futuristic" music, but because the lyrics represent a coherent critique of the world of technology as being full of potential but fraught with peril. Even a cursory look at "Video Killed the Radio Star" shows the song is offering up less than subtle ironies about the medium of pop music, not to mention the fledgling MTV. The Buggles consisted of the tandem of Geoffrey Downes on percussion/keyboards and Trevor Horn doing bass/guitar/percussion/vocals, both of who were obviously more interested in producing. That same year they produced the Yes album "Drama," and the pair ended up joining the group and replacing Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman.
Pay attention to the lyrics on this album. "Kid Dynamo" is about the death of imagination in the age of mass media, a proposition that is clearly becoming more and more obvious with each year. "I Love You Miss Robot" is not kinky, despite its title, and is about the pitfalls of human dependence on technology. As for the music, it is pretty diverse. ""Video Killed the Radio Star" is upbeat and peppy while "Johnny on the Monorail" is the exact opposite, dark and brooding. Of course, at the time the use of electronic devices was considered cutting edge and the novelty of it all distracted from the potency of the lyrics. The Alan Parsons Project tried to do something along these lines with with 1977's "I Robot," but that effort seems ponderous and pretentious when compared to "Age of Plastic." I think I could make a compelling argument that this is one of the top ten, or at least top two dozen albums, from the decade (and you can go either way on that as the end of the 1970s or the start of the 1980s).
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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Steven LeBeau on 29 Sept. 2001
Format: Audio CD
I'll admit, I bough this album for "Video", only to discover that the entire album is excellent. Standouts of course would include "Clean, Clean", "Elstree", "Plastic Age", and of course "Video Killed the Radio Star". It should be mentioned that although Amazon's review mentions drum machines, all the drums were actually played by a real drummer (none other than Ultravox's Warren Cann), though Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes wanted him to sound like a drum machine ('cause they didn't have one at the time)!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on 15 Nov. 2005
Format: Audio CD
The Buggles have their place in music history because their quirky hit "Video Killed the Radio Star" has the distinction of being the first music video shown on MTV. But their 1980 debut album "Age of Plastic" deserves to be remembered on its own terms; not just for the "futuristic" music, but because the lyrics represent a coherent critique of the world of technology as being full of potential but fraught with peril. Even a cursory look at "Video Killed the Radio Star" shows the song is offering up less than subtle ironies about the medium of pop music, not to mention the fledgling MTV. The Buggles consisted of the tandem of Geoffrey Downes on percussion/keyboards and Trevor Horn doing bass/guitar/percussion/vocals, both of who were obviously more interested in producing. That same year they produced the Yes album "Drama," and the pair ended up joining the group and replacing Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman.
Pay attention to the lyrics on this album. "Kid Dynamo" is about the death of imagination in the age of mass media, a proposition that is clearly becoming more and more obvious with each year. "I Love You Miss Robot" is not kinky, despite its title, and is about the pitfalls of human dependence on technology. As for the music, it is pretty diverse. ""Video Killed the Radio Star" is upbeat and peppy while "Johnny on the Monorail" is the exact opposite, dark and brooding. Of course, at the time the use of electronic devices was considered cutting edge and the novelty of it all distracted from the potency of the lyrics. The Alan Parsons Project tried to do something along these lines with with 1977's "I Robot," but that effort seems ponderous and pretentious when compared to "Age of Plastic." I think I could make a compelling argument that this is one of the top ten, or at least top two dozen albums, from the decade (and you can go either way on that as the end of the 1970s or the start of the 1980s).
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By S. Franklin on 27 Aug. 2005
Format: Audio CD
This is an exceptional album of nostalgia and pulsating electricity! As a synth musician myself, I drift off into a world of awe when I hear it, especially 'Living in the Plastic Age'. Most people remember 'Video Killed The Radio Star', but 'Living in the Plastic Age' is indeed a finer track. It borders on classical synth pop and is amazingly written. But then again, Trevor Horn has produced for many major artists including the Pet Shop Boys and Madonna.
Go on, buy the album! It's only 3 and a half quid for pete's sake! You'll love it!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Susan Green on 26 Feb. 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The days of cold dark winter mornings getting ready then walking to school. 'Video Killed the Radio Star' and 'Plastic Age' on the radio before breakfast TV came along. I only bought this album 3 years ago; songs such as 'Astro Boy,Technopop and Kid Dynamo' although they were on the B side of the singles i owned in 79/80 never got listenend to.These songs are so beautifully forlorn and at the same time optimistic about the future.The reprise at the end of'Video'(not on the single)sets off emotions long ago left behind in 1979. ''i heard you on the wireless back in '52..' in 79 that was 27 years in the past, now 1979 + 27 = 2006. So next year look back down that same length of time and see if 'Video' evokes the same thoughts.Im glad to be living in the Age of Plastic...
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