After Goya and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

After Goya Paperback – 3 May 2011


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£21.50 £12.98


Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: YouWriteOn.com (3 May 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1908147261
  • ISBN-13: 978-1908147264
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.7 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,364,892 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Haarlson Phillipps was born in London next door to a notorious prison. He has been on the run ever since, having lived in Valletta (Malta), Reddish, Manchester, Cheltenham, Bishop's Cleeve, Cardiff, Hassall House Farm, Arnside, Lancaster, Great Ayton, Saltburn by the Sea and Durham. He now lives in Barcelona.

Haarlson Phillipps is the author of After Goya, an "intelligent literary thriller" set in present day Spain, and Heavensfield, a crime novel set in the north of England.

He teaches at Hospital Clínic, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge and at Universitat Internacional de Catalunya.

When not reading and writing he enjoys good food and drink shared in good company, cooking, hill walking, visiting art galleries and museums, and pretending to practice castellano and catalan.

Haarlson is currently working on Under Hercules' Eyes -- a collection of short stories. You can catch up with him at http://www.haarlsonphillipps.com

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Elliebb on 29 May 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
After Goya by Haarlson Phillipps

The judgment of a book is always fraught with a reader's own interests, literary taste and biases, of course, and because I like intrigue, Haarlson Phillipps' first novel, After Goya, delivers a good read. It is more than a simple intrigue, however, and with its intelligence and depth of story, will appeal to readers across the thriller genre.
Phillipps has created a story from the simple premise that not all is what it seems and leads the reader through a complex plot against the equal and on-going complexity of the Spanish historical and political scene. A young German woman inherits two painting from her grandfather which are sequestered in Spain and in her rather naïve and innocent attempts to claim them unleashes events involving a local and international cast of characters, solidly built for the most part, along a story path of unexpected plot twists. At the centre of it all is Jordi Cotelo, a policeman of the old school - a Spanish Colombo, if you like, disheveled and plodding and always patting his pockets for his forgotten cell phone. His partner, Jesus Antonio Alvarez, reflects a more modern modus operandi and their relationship provides both tension and insight into the main conflict within the story.
The novel begins with a back-story and both Cotelo and the other main character, the English art expert, James Howard-Graham, also have stories of their own which the author manipulates into believable motives for their actions. And then there is the historical story within the context of the plot and the art interest surrounding the paintings by Goya, all of which add a satisfying density to the story as a whole.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition
As a literary thriller, the plot doesn't disappoint. A simple tale of baddies trying to steal a couple of paintings adds layer upon layer of intrigue as Cotelo follows the trail of subtle clues and curious characters, while simultaneously negotiating the murky waters of Spanish back room politics. The literary and artistic pretensions of the novel are laid on with a light touch, adding depth and richness to a good old rip-roaring tale of detective work.

Cotelo himself is a thinking person's Columbo, dishevelled and disrespectful, with a keen nose for human nature. But he also has political and literary sensibilities, a dark back story, and a dash of sex appeal thrown in for good measure.

For many English readers, this novel will introduce them to an unfamiliar Spain. The traumas and divisions of the civil war still lie just beneath the surface even today. This dark tale of simple greed and complicated historical and political motivations places the reader firmly in that divided society.

As a page-turning thriller with the added richness of literary, artistic and historical settings, this was a very satisfying read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
When I read the blurb on this book I was really looking forward to what looked like a different type of mystery novel. In many ways it didn't disappoint. The story evolves around a German girl who inherits two paintings from her grandfather with one catch - she has to travel to Spain to collect them; or as it turns out, to track them down. The trip turns out to be hugely more onerous than she could have possibly anticipated. All of the lead players are developed well (I particularly liked the lead cop who was apt to losing his phone and the rather pompous art loving Englishman) and the passages of dialogue are excellent. I loved, too, the Spanishness of it: for me the book brought to life many of he customs and unique nature of this beautiful country.
If the book has flaws it is in the fact that I found the narrative difficult to follow at times - mainly because of the sheer volume of historical references and the many organisations (past and present) mentioned in the book. Overall though I found it to be an enjoyable and informative read and I'd happily recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Ken Scott on 16 Dec. 2011
Format: Paperback
Downloaded this book from Kindle for a five hour trip to Barcelona. Carrying out a little research for my own book on the Spanish Civil War and this one seemed to fit the bill. Finished the book in my hotel room on the same day, a 'one dayer,' in my eyes worthy of five stars. Captured the moment perfectly and loved the historical content and the way the author skillfully took the reader back to Spain's darkest days and left just a little hint that they could easily be ressurected. Great plot, well researched book and written with an obvious passion for my adopted homeland. Hoping to read more of the same very soon.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By andy on 5 Feb. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
After Goya by Haarlson Phillipps starts during the Spanish Civil War though sadly for me did not remain there for long. It is a modern day thriller and an intriguing novel that uses Spain, its history and its politics as the backdrop for the story.

I found the novel to be good, but, the narrative in After Goya has some minor criticisms from me: It is about three hundred pages long and the pace within those pages is great but I wonder if a longer novel might not have left me feeling that some things were rushed or badly explained (this is difficult to say fully without giving plot away); Not too keen on the overuse of "He" at the start of a few too many sentences; Finally we got repeated words repeated words within the text and sometimes Lucena with a tilde, but mostly Lucena without a tilde - is this poor proof reading, laziness or both?

After Goya is a good intrigue/thriller novel with good historical and political reference but it seemed a little rushed at times.

Three and a half out of five.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback