After The Gold Rush
 
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After The Gold Rush

1 Sep 1977 | Format: MP3

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:57
30
2
3:46
30
3
3:08
30
4
5:31
30
5
1:16
30
6
3:48
30
7
2:56
30
8
2:33
30
9
3:45
30
10
3:27
30
11
1:33

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 31 Aug 1970
  • Release Date: 31 Aug 1970
  • Label: Reprise
  • Copyright: 2009 Reprise Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 34:40
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003BNETEQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (86 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,539 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

43 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Touring Mars VINE VOICE on 23 Jan 2004
Format: Audio CD
Thoroughly outstanding from start to finish, this is vintage Neil Young. Harder-edged than the follow-up (and more famous) "Harvest", "After The Gold Rush" contains some classic tracks, including the bitter 'Southern Man', Young's vicious swipe at racist attitudes in America's Deep South, which spawned an equally famous retort by Southern rock legends Lynyrd Skynyrd ('Sweet Home Alabama'). Obviously Neil Young didn't get the hint, since 'Alabama' (on Harvest) was equally scathing, albeit not as powerful as the brilliant 'Souhtern Man'. Young's legendarily off-beat, jagged solo guitar style was pretty much born on this track, and ensures that it will hold a special place in any Neil Young collection.
"Only Love Can Break Your Heart" is a Young country standard, practically unparalleled in the rest of his career. With a real country 3/4 beat, and beautiful harmony vocals (presumably by, amongst others, Danny Whitten), it's almost a mournful lament of a song. (Later covered by St. Etienne to great effect on 'Fox Base Alpha')
Other highlights include the brilliant opener, "Tell Me Why", which really sets the scene for what you can expect from the rest of the album. "Don't Let It Bring You Down" is another top track, although lyrically a bit confused. Also, "When You Dance You Can Really Love" is musically a great song, but what the hell he's on about is a matter of debate! But it only goes to show that even if one part of a song is lacking, it is compensated by the sheer quality of another part. The result is that there isn't a weak song on the album. Even Young's cover version of country standard "Oh Lonesome Me" is thoroughly appropriate and fits right in with the rest of the album.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By D. J. Roberts on 10 Feb 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
There probably aren't too many casual looks at this treasure unfortunately. It's an album that many of the current crop of "singer/songwriters" could do with listening to. Well worth a punt for anybody.

To those who know the record, I bought this cd on its'first release. Personally, I have never heard it sound so good. I could wax on about all sorts, but the bottom line is if you like or love this collection of songs you have to buy this edition to hear them in a depth and swathe of detail I'm sure many of us won't have heard before, even on the vinyl which was good. I'm drawing a breath, but have come to the conclusion that this sounds better than my first (British) press original vinyl - not a memory, I continue to play and enjoy vinyl. I'm sure Neil Young was waiting for the digital technology to catch up and he has been proved right to wait. Superlative.

Lights out, volume up and you have Neil Young and band in your room. And you are in the room as they recorded the music; you can picture where each of them stood to do their parts. Top class.

The above comments also apply equally well to "Harvest".
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Troels Stampe Johansen on 21 May 2011
Format: Audio CD
Having heard Harvest prior to After the Gold Rush, I thought I'd heard what Neil Young had to offer. Boy was I wrong.
After the Gold Rush features some of Young's greatest folk music, as well as some really great rockers that are far superior to the rock songs on Harvest. There, already I've stated what is the real purpose of this review: After the Gold Rush is better than Harvest, by a mile... or two.
"Tell Me Why" opens up the album nicely. It's catchy, but absolutely not one of the best on the album. This immediately changes on the following song, also the title song, which is an extremely beautiful acoustic folk song. And this is where Neil Young really shines. The title song is not the only acoustic deserve-to-be-classic song on the album. "Don't let it bring you Down" and "Birds" are some of the asolute best songs, I've heard from Neil Young, and it is not difficult to see why the singer/songwriter-genre has turned out to be so popular since.
Neil Young seems to be the first singer/songwriter to really give this much of himself. It's deeply personal and the lyrics are simply masterpieces.
But Young doesn't stop here. Whereas most musicians and bands have trouble mastering only one genre, Neil Young shows that he is also a master of country-rock. "Southern Man" manages to keep the personality of his folk songs, but in a rock package with awesome country/blues-solos.

On the last notes, I'll encourage you all to start out by listening to Harvest (if you're new to Young), as that is Young at his most catchy and straightforward. But it's with Harvest's predecessor, After the Gold Rush, that Neil Young's talent and potential truly shines. A masterpiece, and after only a few listens, one of my all-time favourite albums.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Asko on 10 May 2007
Format: Audio CD
I think that Neil Young as an artist is slightly overrated, and some of his most praised albums like Zuma and especially Tonight's the Night I don't really care for...

But this record is a different matter. I still remember the day when I bought it; on the first listen it was sort of OK, but then on the same night I put it on again and listened to it (via headphones); only then it really started to make an impact on me, and I just couln't stop listening - I didn't get much sleep that night, let me tell you!

This is one of those rare albums where "every song is better than the next". Even the songs that could be called throwaways, like just-over-a-minute-long Till the Morning Comes and Cripple Creek Ferry, have great warmth and beauty in them (I especially love the backing choir of the former - pure magic!).

If you are into Young's rock side, this might not be the right record for you, but for the fans of simple, beautiful and heartfelt music it is a must-have.
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