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Afraid Of Sunlight
 
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Afraid Of Sunlight

18 Aug 2008 | Format: MP3

7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 10.00 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
7:28
30
2
5:45
30
3
5:12
30
4
5:01
30
5
7:54
30
6
6:49
30
7
6:10
30
8
7:03
Disc 2
30
1
6:04
30
2
4:34
30
3
5:14
30
4
5:17
30
5
5:59
30
6
7:27
30
7
1:17
30
8
6:02
30
9
6:51

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 26 Jun 1995
  • Release Date: 26 Jun 1995
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: EMI UK
  • Copyright: 1999 Parlophone Records Ltd. This label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved. (C) 1999 Parlophone Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:40:07
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001TJSVCA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 38,605 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By N. Mason VINE VOICE on 7 Jun 2006
Format: Audio CD
Marillion of this era (mid 1990's) appear to be generally defined by the album 'Brave'. I feel very strongly that this is the album that defined them then and, in many ways, continues to define them now.

It is a supremely listenable album but one that challenges every time you do listen. 'Gazpacho' is a good, if not great, opener. 'Cannibal Surf Babe'is the one slightly disappointing track on the album and one that, in my opinion, does not gel with the other tracks. The remainder of the album is magical with three of the best tracks they have ever made in 'Beautiful' 'Afraid of Sunlight' and 'King' with the rest of the tracks not far behind. I feel that these three tracks show every side of the band with 'Beautiful' highlighting the truly melodic side; 'AoS' is an epic with musicianship and vocals of the highest quality and one of the few tracks on any album I have that I will repeat play when listening. 'King' builds superbly and highlights the tougher sound of the band.

If you are thinking of buying one Marillion album I would strongly recomemend this underrated album as a way in to an underrated band.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Stotty on 21 Oct 2006
Format: Audio CD
After the bleak, plodding Brave, Afraid Of Sunlight sees the band right back on song.

The theme of fallen heroes/celebrities really gives the album depth and the songs, although not the most immediate in the world, get better and better with each listen.

Gazpacho and the superb title track are classic, traditional Marillion numbers. Out Of This World is probably the best track on the album and for me takes me back to Chelsea Monday. The Donald Campell theme also gives the song a real beautifully macabre undercurrent (no pun intended). Beautiful is the finest ballad the band have ever written and King is a superb show stopping finale.

There are some odd-bod tracks that the album was more memorable for at the time, the Motorhead meets the Beach Boys mess of Cannibal Surf Babe, the road moviesque Afraid Of Sunrise and the Phil Spector style Beyond You.

Despite these songs, Afraid Of Sunlight remains Marillion's most underrated album and a work of genuine beauty. First Class.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 Nov 2000
Format: Audio CD
A.O.S., on its release, was the softest sounding Marillion album to date. This is very much an album that exemplifies Marillion's painstaking musicianship and less the stadium rock sound of the past. For example, the trademark roaring guitar solos of the past are noticeably absent, but the album is still of an electric and not acoustic sound. The softer music than that of previous recordings provided Steve Hogarth with a chance to really make the most of his soulful voice, rather than the power vocals that you expect to hear from a rock singer. As usual with Marillion, there isn't a bad tune on here, with only the ridiculous, embarrassing, unnecessary and out of place Beach Boys impression Cannibal Surf Babe detracting from the "pressures of fame" theme of the other songs and the "be yourself and sod the rest" theme of Beautiful.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By PD Flood on 29 Sep 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
8 tracks of pain and heaven. Beauty and sorrow. Success and defeat. Life and death.

An album that doffs it's cap to Lennon, OJ Simpson, Hendrix, Tyson, Cobain, Brian Wilson and Donald Campbell, is clearly not one full of laughs. But rather than languishing in misery and sorrow, this album rises like a phoenix from the flames to offer beauty, poignancy and catharsis.

The album still has influences of prog in there (influences NOT rip-offs) such as Floyd (Out Of This World), Genesis and Rush (Gazpacho). However, there are also references to The Beach Boys (Cannibal Surf Babe), REM (Beautiful), Nirvana, Hendrix and The Beatles (King), Talk Talk and Phil Spector (Beyond You) and Joni Mitchell (Afraid of Sunrise), although all of these influences are very carefully employed and not overused.

However, it's the title track that wins gold on this album. And this is a song that only Marillion could write. The epitome of all that's great about the band.

Interestingly, this album was made in a relatively short time, under great pressure from their label (after taking nearly 2 years to create it's predecessor 'Brave'.) I can only assume that pressure brings out the best in this band. They've never quite reached these heights again since leaving EMI (almost, but not quite).

If there is ever one Marillion album that you should hear, then this is it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By PNeruda on 5 Jan 2009
Format: Audio CD
I just love this record since the first time I listen to this so many years ago. I fell in love with this music and with the memories that sorround it every time that I listen this record, and I am always ready to do it again. This is the very best music, with Brave and This Strange Engine, recorded by Marillion with Mr. Hogarth as the front man of the band. Get it and enjoy the pleasure of music.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By lerusty on 6 Oct 2008
Format: Audio CD
'Afraid of Sunlight' was released in the summer of 1995, quite quickly after its highly-rated predecessor 'Brave'.

I am a life-long fan of Marillion but, before the release of this album, I feared that they were losing their way a bit; I must be one of the few fans who has never been that keen on 'Brave'. However, I think that Afraid of Sunlight is brilliant, especially the 27 minute second half which is outstanding throughout.

'Beautiful' was released as a single and it was played a few times on the local radio station where I was living at the time.

'Brave' rocked preety hard. AoS has its moments but, for me, it is a very emotional album which has excellent, very poignant, quite painful lyrics. This album contains one of Hogarth's finest vocal performances. The man is in emotional turmoil and you can hear the raw emotion in his voice: 'Been in pain for so long / I can't even say what hurts anymore' he cries in the title track. 'I will pretend and be strong' he promises in 'Beyond You' the song during which he also tells us 'I reach out to hold you / But all I do is hurt you'. A fantastic vocal range, amazingly powerful, especially at the end of the closing track 'King' (what a build up!) and during parts of the tital track. Emotionally charged and pleading at other times. You cannot but feel his suffering in this record. My God; this guy knows what it is to hurt.

Rothery's guitar adds to it, especially in the track 'Out of this World' which certainly lives up to its name. A glorious guitar solo, and he is renowned for them, of course. Mark Kelly's keyboards add a certain landscape of beauty, especially in 'Out of This World' and 'Beyond You.
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