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Affective Computing Paperback – 14 Sep 2000

4 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: MIT Press; New Ed edition (14 Sept. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262661152
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262661157
  • Product Dimensions: 17.3 x 1.5 x 24.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 266,202 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

"Compelling... Picard convincingly demonstrates that computers can also be designed to think about feelings and how to rationally act in light of them... A groundbreaking preface to a plausible direction in computer design." Norman Weinstein, Technology Review "Today's computers are cold, logical machines. They needn't be. In thisimportant book, Rosalind Picard presents a compelling image, not only ofhow machines might come to have emotions, but why they must. Emotions: notjust for animals and people." Donald A. Norman , Hewlett-Packard; Professor Emeritus, CognitiveScience, University of California, San Diego; Author of Things that makeus smart


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Format: Hardcover
Most of this book is a primer for non-clinicians on what is meant by 'human emotions', and how a computer in physical contact with someone could identify that person's mood and respond appropriately to it. Picard makes her case that 'emotional intelligence' would be a useful attribute for software. A human who loses the ability to feel emotions becomes, not admirably logical like Mr. Spock, but unable to make quick, simple, arbitrary decisions and prone to repeat mistakes. Just like most software today. Picard relates the use of affective computing primarily to the 'wearable computers' that researchers at MIT have been playing with for over 10 years to do mostly trivial functions like take photographs and generate muzak. There wasn't much here for those of us who have to interact through keyboards/mice and monitors, and surprisingly no attempt to connect affective computing with related techniques such as fuzzy logic. There is an excellent source reference list at the back.
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Format: Hardcover
A fascinating book with many implications for the fields of artifical intelligence and human-computer interaction. Picard provides a rich background on modern research in emotion and puts forth compelling arguments for the need to incorporate affective abilities in computers as, perhaps, the only way to allow them to respond intelligently to their environment and make rational decisions. An entertaining and mind-opening read.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9a55ea98) out of 5 stars 9 reviews
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9a734df8) out of 5 stars Wearable computers can respond intelligently to your mood 5 Jan. 1998
By redmore@null.net - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Most of this book is a primer for non-clinicians on what is meant by 'human emotions', and how a computer in physical contact with someone could identify that person's mood and respond appropriately to it. Picard makes her case that 'emotional intelligence' would be a useful attribute for software. A human who loses the ability to feel emotions becomes, not admirably logical like Mr. Spock, but unable to make quick, simple, arbitrary decisions and prone to repeat mistakes. Just like most software today. Picard relates the use of affective computing primarily to the 'wearable computers' that researchers at MIT have been playing with for over 10 years to do mostly trivial functions like take photographs and generate muzak. There wasn't much here for those of us who have to interact through keyboards/mice and monitors, and surprisingly no attempt to connect affective computing with related techniques such as fuzzy logic. There is an excellent source reference list at the back.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9a74799c) out of 5 stars Interesting book - Very interesting area. 16 May 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is an interesting book, and I strongly agree with Picard's assertion that computers ought to be able to "recognize" and respond to human emotions. She does an excellent job of making and supporting this point. The other part of her thesis, that computers themselves should have "emotions" is much less clear. She never seemed to adequately make the case that a computer with its own emotions would be of any significant value for anything, and frankly I can't think of any useful applications for such an ability. Some sort of emotional component may be needed to fully support and achieve AI (and she makes this point) but in terms of sort of the standard user interface types of applications it's hard to imagine how such a capability could be useful.
Anyway, good book on a very interesting topic.
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9a8796e4) out of 5 stars The missing ingredient for true artificial intelligence 19 May 1999
By ericpa@hotmail.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
A fascinating book with many implications for the fields of artifical intelligence and human-computer interaction. Picard provides a rich background on modern research in emotion and puts forth compelling arguments for the need to incorporate affective abilities in computers as, perhaps, the only way to allow them to respond intelligently to their environment and make rational decisions. An entertaining and mind-opening read.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9a74e90c) out of 5 stars Good Read 17 Mar. 2015
By ladybug - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Great book for knowing the history of affective computing and it's evolution. Outdated for today's classroom. I hope she writes another version on the cutting edge research being done in the present and how she sees the field in the next 10 years.
HASH(0x9a74e8dc) out of 5 stars Five Stars 4 Mar. 2015
By John Gottman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A real breakthrough book
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