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Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction Paperback – 7 Oct 2004

4.5 out of 5 stars 97 customer reviews

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Paperback, 7 Oct 2004
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Product details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Michael Joseph Ltd; New edition edition (7 Oct. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0718146905
  • ISBN-13: 978-0718146900
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 3.4 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (97 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,012,832 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

As funny as anything Townsend has written, in which the loft-dwelling Mole wrestles with credit-card debt, WMD and where to find a dentist (Sunday Times)

The funniest book of the year. I can think of no more comical read (Jeremy Paxman Sunday Telegraph)

He will be remembered some day as one of England's great diarists (Evening Standard) --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Sue Townsend is on of Britain’s bestselling authors. Her hugely successful novels include five Adrian Mole books, The Public Confessions of a Middle-Aged Woman (Aged 553/4) and Number Ten. She is also well known as a playwright. She lives in Leicester. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The latest episode in the Adrian Mole story has arrived, and it is amazing how Sue Townsend manages to keep the story fresh and hilariously funny. This is not a book to read on a train or other public venue and I for one found myself laughing aloud and giggling with amusement as the twists and turns of this diary unfold. Mole's potential for disaster and embarrassment continue unabated and the whole sage of his engagement to the awful Marigold plays out throughout the book.
Alongside Adrian's story we also catch up with his children and his parents, and of course the lovely Pandora, now a junior government Minister. These books are nothing if not topical and reading it is also a political history of the last two years, as Tony Blair stumbles deeper into the morass of Iraq, stretching the loyalty even of Adrian and ultimately Pandora. Other contemporary themes occuring in the book include the property improvement fad, credit card debt, the impact of ethnic cultures on the face of Britain and the animal rights movement.
There are some wonderful new characters in the book too - Adrian's employer, Marigold's sister, and of course the awful potential-father in-law Mr Flowers. While Sue Townsend of course encourages to laugh at Adrian's escapades, she also manages to make us sympathise with him and to identify with some of the problems he experiences. A wonderfully warm and human book, very easy to read, and well worth catching up with.
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Format: Hardcover
The new Adrian Mole book is - perhaps surprisingly - quite excellent. Having turned 34, the teenage insecurities he is so well-known for are now far behind...or?
I think Sue Townshend has managed to keep the storyline going very well through the changing times (The series now comprises Adrian's life through 20 years, meticulously recorded day by day), and this book introduces a whole new cast of side characters, as well as some familiar old faces. This book is much better than the recent ones - it's funny, touching, sad and toe-curling at the same time.
Definitely recommended - though you'll undoubtedly enjoy it more if you have read at least some of the previous books.
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By Rotgut VINE VOICE on 7 Oct. 2010
Format: Paperback
Adrian Mole was the Harry Potter of the Eighties...a publishing phenomenen, written for children but read by everyone, entering the national consciousness, engendering a successful sequel and quickly translating to the screen.

Fast forward to 2004 and we have this, "Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction"in which Sue Townsend (like J K Rowling almost undoubtedly will) continues the story of her schoolboy hero into adulthood.

The diary format, a very accessible and flexible first-person style of narrative, is retained, of course, and missives between characters also drive the narrative on; Adrian has remained an enthusiastic letter writer (E Mails are sent now and again but really Townsend's characters seem to inhabit an earlier age, as most of the literature and music referenced shows.)

Mole himself is a great comic creation, similar to Mr Pooter in many ways. While he is as naive and indecisive as ever, he has matured into a witty adult (e.g. p.223 , while viewing a particularly unpleasant modern art exhibition: "I know a lot about art, but I don't know what I like.") Other characters are just as strong, the mad Flowers clan manage to get our hero into many comic scrapes, his boss Mr Carlton-Hayes is that most unusual figure in a modern novel, a thoroughly decent man.

As the novel progresses, the comedy moments of killer swans and ridiculous home furnishings are eclipsed by a serious and genuinely moving examination of the Blair/Bush War in Iraq. Satiric comedy is a valid and effective way of attacking high minded politics and has been since the ancient Athenian Greeks invented modern literature.
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Format: Paperback
Adrian Mole is a serial loser in the game of life. His diaries are a catalogue of his sexual frustrations, feelings of infinite loneliness and despair that his life will remain unfulfilled. His hopes for a career at the BBC, or his plans to become a great intellectual will never be realised and his passion for Pandora will never come to fruition. We, the readers know this, but Adrian sadly does not. Nevertheless, it has always been tremendously enjoyable reading his diaries and witnessing how he squirms his way through life.

The WOMD plots a similar course as previous Mole diaries. It provides a very engaging romp through the typically turbulent world of Mole but it also serves up a very skillful satire of the excesses and pitfalls of modern life in Britain during the Blair `boom and (unfortunately) bust' years. There is Mole's worsening financial situation as he falls for the lure of easy credit. His quest to regain his holiday deposit by writing letters to government ministers to provide him with proof of WOMD. The worries about his `grand-design' obsessed parents and his absent children living abroad (one fighting in Afghanistan). Finally, the main thread is devoted to his failing love life with a new girlfriend called Marigold (who is a walking fashion-disaster), her feisty sister Daisy and his lifelong romantic obsession, Pandora.

We are also treated to some excellent background characters that punctuate the story. The booming Mr. Flowers (Marigold's father) who both frightens and amuses in equal measure. Adrian's old-fashioned bookshop owner, Mr. Carlton Hayes, who lends an air of reason to Adrian's unreasonable expectations. At his new home Adrian has to put up with a noise-intolerant neighbour and an indignant swan called Gielgud.
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