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Adolescent Sex


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Amazon's Japan Store

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Product details

  • Audio Cassette
  • ASIN: B000ZBFU1I
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,050,857 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Mr. J. S. Maclaren on 1 May 2004
Format: Audio CD
For an album virtually disowned by the band and slated by reviews ever since, it is actually pretty good. It is, in so many ways, a million miles away from their classics, 'Gentlemen Take Polaroids' and 'Tin Drum'. Influenced by the early glam-rock sounds of Roxy Music and Bowie, it is Japan rocking out. But more than that, on a few tracks, there seems to be a heavy funk sound going on back there. And while it seems to jar with the punk aesthetic so widespread at the time, there are definite influences. But while it is so different from their later work, there are some definite links: Mick Karn's bass is still key (although far more straightforward and less adventurous); David Sylvian's voice still dominates, mixed quite high on most tracks; and Richard Barbieri is definitely enjoying getting to grips with his toys.
The album has a rawer, less particular feel about it, but for all that it, each of the songs seem to me to be complete and well-rounded. 'Suburban Love' has a Chic-feel to it, and feels slightly subversive. 'Adolescent Sex' sounds just as the title suggests - a little rough, a little fumbling, but kinda fun and naughty all the same. The Streisand cover, 'Don't Rain on my Parade' is performed with great gusto, and feels like fun - and so it should. 'Television' has a rhythm which could house a lounge-jazz tune, but gradually builds into a crescendo of frustrated angst - 'It's all you ever wanted!'.
All in all, it's never going to be their greatest album. But it has a variety of interesting qualities - which, if you are like me, is plenty enough to give it a listen. The flaws are there, for sure, but there is definitely something of note in there too. Give it a whirl, you might be glad you did. I was.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mr. J. Winney on 16 Mar. 2003
Format: Audio CD
25 years on ... I still listen to this, it's a cliche, but a great test!!! I was turned onto Japan by a mate at college (now RIP), but this is not why I still give AS a spin. As a teenager in the late 70s I was caught between punk and rock - going with the former and swinging back to the later once the bubble burst. Japan, and AS in particluar, stood out because it had energy and was clever. Not either, but DIFFERENT.
If you want to make music with a guitar (or just listen to it) you should hear this at least once, what's the worst thing that could happen (Belious Some ??) :-)
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 Oct. 2003
Format: Audio CD
After seeing Japan endure the worst reaction ever from a Glasgow audience, supporting Blue Oyster Cult, I dashed out to buy this album on vinyl. Yes, they had a borrowed, androgenous, look which leant heavily on the New York Dolls, but they were entirely out of keeping with the times - a good thing in my view. AS prompted a 5 star review from "Sounds" Geoff Barton at the time. I followed them through all the changes, right to the end, because Japan never failed to provoke and challenge. Listen to this album and find out why.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Henk Beentje TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 Oct. 2007
Format: Audio CD
I actually prefer the two first Japan albums over the introspective noodling that came later - and which most people seem to prefer. It was a breath of fresh air amidst the punk offerings of the time - it had good lyrics, internal tension, a band that sounded together and played tight music. And, after all these years, it still works. The opener, 'Transmission' was pretty weird even in 1978: pounding drums and bass, a tight guitar warp, and an organ floating through - strange background vocals, daft solos. And still it works. They might disown it - I love it! And like 'I wish you were black' there is a biting intensity to David Sylvians voice that keeps the attention going, as well as the feet moving; 'Performance' is another good track in this vein. But I like all the tracks, with 'Suburban love' another tense favourite. An excellent album.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By L. G. on 23 Jun. 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I love this album as a long time Japan/David Sylvian fan. Even though I know he has said that he doesn't feel any connection to Japan's earlier music as it is so dramatically different to the music he writes nowadays, I still think it is brilliant and shouldn't be written off! It has a kind of 'seventies' feel, dabbling in hard rock and disco sounds but the music is incredibly melodic and catchy and David's vocal style varies considerably, from his usual gentle, 'pure' voice to sexy and breathy, to all out rock god! Complemented by the excellent musicianship of Karn, Jansen, Barbieri and Dean. My favourite track is 'Television' which goes on forever with David's breathy vocals and a hypnotic groove! I would recommend this album and the even more fabulous 'Obscure Alternatives' album where you can hear glimpses of David's unmistakeable, unique style starting to come through.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By PP on 6 July 2011
Format: Audio CD
I bought this album when it first came out in 1978. This was the year when shedloads of great punk/new wave bands released stunning debuts, but to me this was in the true punk spirit as it was so out of sync with everything else out there. The music is a fusion of Heavy rock and funk and had the sass of early seventies Bowie and Roxy music running through it. The musicianship is excellent, with twin guitars to the fore, some great riffs and solos. Lush sounding keyboards, a thumping drum sound and the bass is astounding, refusing to do the normal things and snaking through the tracks with melody and cohesion. The only slight weakness is the vocals, which are a little on the thin side but the delivery and lyrics make up for this in the same way that Televisions classic "Marquee moon" did. Above all this though are the actual songs, all of which are class, from the short "the unconventional" to the 10 minute epic "television".
The album that came next, "Obscure alternatives" was almost as good but was more reggae influenced and not as rocky, the third album "Quiet life" ditched the rock guitar in favour of a disco type sound and that was the end for me. A friend owned the supposedly classic "tin drum", which, to my ears, was souless, cold and typified the awful 80's music scene.
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