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Adobe Premiere Pro Power Tips: Secrets, Shortcuts, and Techniques [Paperback]

Larry Jordan
2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
RRP: 21.99
Price: 21.57 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Book Description

20 Dec 2012

Stop wasting time! Let Larry Jordan’s Adobe Premiere Pro Power Tips power your editing. Whether you are migrating to Premiere Pro from other editing software, or you are a long-time Premiere editor, this must-have guide is packed with hundreds of bite-sized tips to get you up and running in no time.

Written with humor and deep technical understanding, Jordan shows you the secrets, shortcuts, tips, and techniques you need to make the most of Premiere Pro.

Like any professional production, the book starts with planning, then flows into scripting, shooting, logging, editing, audio mixing, and final output with hundreds of Power Tips covering Story, Prelude, Premiere, Audition and Adobe Media Encoder. These Power Tips will:

* Speed your editing
* Expand your knowledge
* Wow your clients (and keep them coming back for more!)

Visit the companion website (www.focalpress.com/9780415657075) to see video demonstrations that accompany this book.


Frequently Bought Together

Adobe Premiere Pro Power Tips: Secrets, Shortcuts, and Techniques + An Editor's Guide to Adobe Premiere Pro
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Product details

  • Paperback: 312 pages
  • Publisher: Focal Press (20 Dec 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415657075
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415657075
  • Product Dimensions: 18.8 x 23.5 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,246,909 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

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Product Description

About the Author

Larry Jordan is an internationally-renowned author, presenter, consultant, and Apple-Certified trainer in digital media with over 35 years of experience as a television producer, director, and editor with national broadcast and corporate credits. His informative and entertaining teaching style provides film and video editors around the world with unique techniques, methods and resources to increase their productivity and enhance their skills. Visit his website at: www.larryjordan.biz.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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2.0 out of 5 stars general 19 July 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I really didn't like this book, trying to read through it was like watching paint dry.
in my humble view the way the book was laid out was completely wrong
and people new to pp. cs6 would find it extremely difficult to digest
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Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  27 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars incredible 14 Oct 2013
By College Kid - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I'm a junior in college. I've taken classes, watched tutorials and read more than a few books on premiere. This book is incredible. I couldn't put it down, every page holds invaluable information. If you are serious about editing do yourself a favor and buy this book. Every page is packed with tips that have already saved me hours of frustration by making my workflow significantly more efficient. Buy this book. You won't regret it, I promise.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Clear and easy to follow, good for novices, with a few new tricks, but most will be familiar to regular Premiere Pro users 25 Oct 2013
By Nathan Andersen - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I've been editing with Premiere Pro on and off for a few years. I am, however, very much an amateur in the sense that I don't spend a lot of time editing. I use it just every once and a while for little projects, and the occasional (amateur) short documentary subject. That means I do forget things, and am not as efficient as I might be. I know what kinds of things can be done, but often need to look up exactly how online.

So I was excited to work through this book, in the hopes that it would help me build new skills. After reading it through, I can say I learned a few things, but most of it I already knew as a result of working through some introductory tutorials when I first got started and then reading tips on forums. Another thing worth knowing - that isn't entirely clear from the product page - is that this is really aimed at CS5.5 and CS6, as there is not even a mention here about Creative Cloud or any of the new features that come with its latest upgrades. That's okay with me, since I'm sticking with CS6 for now anyways, and most of the information will be the same, but those really wanting to get up to speed might do better to look online (or elsewhere) for tutorials and guides. I do that, too, but I like having a reference I can put my hands on, and this one's not bad. An better book, in my opinion, is Richard Harrington's An Editor's Guide to Adobe Premiere Pro. I haven't seen his latest edition, but I bought and worked through the first edition when I was first learning Premiere Pro, having had some experience with Final Cut Express, and it was an excellent guide, that went a lot farther than this book does into not only telling you how to do things efficiently but into the editing process itself and why you would want to do things in various ways.

The aim of this guide is to get you familiar with and faster at using not only Premiere Pro, but some of the other applications in Adobe's video editing suite, such as Prelude, Story, and Audition. (There's nothing here about After Effects, of course, which would require its own book just to get started.) This is pitched as a tip book. It's not really an introduction. If you are just starting out with Premiere Pro, and need to learn about the basics of non-linear editing, this isn't the place to begin. This book presumes you know all that -- either because you are already using Premiere Pro, or because you've used something similar like Final Cut 7 and you're making the switch to Premiere. It doesn't teach you how to edit, either, only offers guidance as to some of the most efficient ways to accomplish the most important editing tasks using software in the Creative Suite - focused on the essential processes of managing resources, ingesting clips, arranging the editing space, editing video and sound quickly and efficiently, and adding titles and effects.

Although most of the advice is pretty standard and won't tell you much that's new if you've been working on Premiere Pro for a while, what I do really appreciate are the occasional insights from the author into best practices. The author is obviously an experienced editor and occasionally offers advice that is not platform specific, about how to name files, how to organize audio tracks, and such, and that advice is often extremely helpful. Even though I didn't learn a lot of new things about Premiere Pro itself, I'm glad I read through this for its insights into efficiency and organization. I tend just to fill up my Project Panel with files and then search through them to find what I'm looking for; even worse, I tend not to organize my original video as well as I could, and end up not knowing what I can and can't safely delete when I'm done with a project. I did learn a lot from the Audition chapter, since I have only tinkered around with that program and have never seriously tried to figure out anything beyond some of its most basic functionality and its auto heal function (which is amazing!).

To sum up: this is a handy guide for building competence that would be ideal for the moderately experienced Premiere Pro editor, or for the newbie who has some experience with similar editing programs. It also has some good general advice that is likely to help anyone but the most experienced editors. It isn't for total newcomers, though. It is also exclusively focused on CS5.5 and CS6, although most of what it covers will apply to earlier and later versions of Adobe editing programs. In my opinion, though, most users will be better off picking up a copy of Richard Harrington's An Editor's Guide to Adobe Premiere Pro.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hundreds of tips, literally 30 Dec 2013
By Larry Commons - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
As a long-time Final Cut Pro user, I've often referenced Larry Jordan's info online when a "How do I do that?" situation arose. Since I'm also using Premiere Pro these days, this book is a good resource for having lots of info in one place without having to search around.

That said, the book isn't an end-all tutorial for Premiere Pro. It's more useful for editors who have used Premiere at least some previously.

The cover promises "hundreds of tips" and that's no exaggeration. Everything from setting up preferences, to keyboard shortcuts, to editing with better organization is covered here. There's also lots of info on audio, which is nice.

One thing I really like is that the headline for every tip has a sub-headline that says more -- example: "Adjusting Audio Levels" is followed by the phrase "Using the mixer allows greater precision." Then six short paragraphs explain how to do it.

Nice graphics, high-quality paper -- just what you'd expect from Focal Press books.

Recommended.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good book 2 Dec 2013
By Stephen M. Lerch - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
If you are looking for an in depth, how to get started book, stop reading this review, go back to the Amazon search panel and do another search. This is NOT the book for beginners. Well, not beginning beginers.

This book is designed with the assumption that you know how to get around Premiere Pro already. Sure, it gives tips on how to build your workflow and name files/folders, but it does NOT give you in depth analysis on how to use certain functions or features. It does teach you what some of the things in menus and preferences means, but this doesn't help the beginner do anything more than set the software up to work optimally within their unknown workflow.

In terms of the way this book is written, I am accustomed to books about Adobe products saying "press this for the Mac, this for PC." This book almost universally assumes everyone is using the Mac. If you need to know the commands or equivalent functions on a Windows based PC, then this may not be the book for you. If you are comfortable with being provided an afterthought on OS equivalent functions, say you already know all about your Windows computer, then it's probably not a big deal. This is the case for me, and I don't judge or drop stars because the book doesn't put me in the limelight. MOST professionals ARE using Macs, so this makes sense to be written this way.

The tips themselves range from simple setup recommendations (how to name a project, what format to edit in based on the final target format, etc) to time code utilization to ADR tool usage. Everything is designed to help make you more efficient or adjust your workflow to become more efficient.

The book is written in a semi-linear fashion, but no chapter REALLY demands you read any of the previous chapters. They do sometimes bring up examples of things from a prior chapter, but only to say "if you remember from that last chapter, this means that."

The only disappointing thing here is that Creative Cloud isn't even mentioned. Of course, looking at the November 2012 release date, it should be obvious that the CC version of Premiere was still CS6, just you paid every month to have it and the feature set was the same. I hope they are working on a follow up for CC changes, though honestly everything in the book can easily be applied to CC.

This just makes me wonder, based on most of the reviews being from Amazon Vine, why the publisher waited more than a year to put the book in the Vine program. My guess is sales were less than brisk and they are taking a jab at making the book sell as it should.

Well written and knows the audience. Recommended.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book for intermediate Premiere users 28 Nov 2013
By GameMaker - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I've been using Premiere for quite a few years now. I've edited a handful of short films, and lots of short personal video projects over the years. I'm more of a hobbyist and student though, so I don't use Premiere everyday, I forget things, and also don't always keep up with all of the latest changes from version to version. So for my level of skill, and my usage, this book is perfect.

It's an interesting book in that it really serves equally well as reference and a book you can read cover-to-cover, or a chapter at a time or whatever. It's broken down into chapters that cover the major functional subsections of Premiere. Like setting up, preferences, editing, exporting, and effects. It also includes chapters on things not really part of Premiere, but that could be part of your workflow, like Adobe Story and Audition. Each chapter is then broken down into very small subsections, that are kind of little "facts" or "tips". The tips include everything from things like what sort of machine will make use of Mercury Playback Engine (and what it is), what are some of the recommended hard drive configurations, to things like how to do a "J" cut, or what the default keyboard shortcuts are and how to change or add to them.

In other words, if you are working on a project and scratching your head over how to accomplish something, you can pick up this book, look the topic up in the index, and have a pretty good chance of finding the answer you are looking for. Conversely, you could be kicking back in your recliner or bed, pick up this book, and skim through the chapters, really quickly and efficiently, and just read through some of the topics that you'd like to know about and learn some "power user" sorts of things that will help you next time you sit down to edit.

What this book is not good for: It won't teach you how to edit, it won't teach you how to use Premiere from ground zero. It has no examples or tutorials. Its all how to do this, and how to do that, and how you can accomplish this more efficiently, and here's a way to do that, that you probably didn't know about, and so forth. In other words, it's a great supplementary book for intermediate and advanced users.
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