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Addicted Hardcover – 7 Sep 1998

43 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: CollinsWillow; 1st edition (7 Sept. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0002187949
  • ISBN-13: 978-0002187947
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 16.2 x 3.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 137,287 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Amazon Review

Arsenal and England stalwart Tony Adams combines two very '90s preoccupations in these memoirs: football and the confessional. Alongside the story of Adams' hugely successful career for Arsenal and England, Addicted also charts his decline into alcoholism and subsequent efforts at rehabilitation. The combination works surprisingly well with Adams new-found self-awareness enabling a far more thoughtful and mature insight into his footballing life than you suspect would otherwise have been the case.

Thrust into the Arsenal first team at 17, his tenacity and enthusiasm made up for initial technical shortcomings and his leadership ability inevitably saw him made captain. But off the pitch things were not so straightforward. His marriage was in disarray and his drinking out of control. After a particularly intense period of "research into the illness"--a day-long bender following England's defeat on penalties to Germany in Euro 96--Adams sought help and while his account of his ongoing AA-aided recovery occasionally lapses into clichéd therapy-speak, there is a raw honesty to it that makes it both moving and affecting. Much has been made of Adams' apparent criticism of Glen Hoddle's handling of England's 1998 World Cup bid, but in reality the strength of this book comes not from the spilling of dressing-room secrets, but from its powerful depiction of the price one man continues to pay for success. --Nick Wroe

Review

‘The most successful captain in Arsenal’s history symbolises everything the club traditionally stands for in terms of resilience, professionalism, pride and attitude’
FourFourTwo magazine


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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Matty on 7 May 2006
Format: Paperback
Someone bought me a copy of this for Christmas, and although I'm not an Arsenal fan I've always admired Tony Adams so I was happy to read it. It's as brutal and frank as everyone says, and it also made me look at myself and some of my friends in terms of the way we act with sport, competition and alcohol. Details of how TA found any excuse to drink alcohol, be it celebrating, drowning sorrows or whatever, made me realise how close many of us are to slipping down the same route. After reading this and being totally blown away by it, I picked up autobiographys by Dennis Wise, Harry Redknapp, Chris Waddle, Ian Wright, Paolo DiCanio and Bobby Robson. All interesting in their own way, but in comparison to this they fell way short. Wright, DiCanio and Wise in particular just prattle on about how great they are, and how everyone else had it in for them for no reason. Unlike TA they are unable to accept that they have any flaws. It's that brutal honesty and self assessment that makes this book rise above the rest. I'll be reading it again for sure.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. A. C. Gilbert VINE VOICE on 28 April 2003
Format: Paperback
Football fan or not, Arsenal fan or not, Addicted is worth reading for anyone who wishes to gain an insight into the world of addiction.
This book is like a punch in the solar plexus. Adams bares his soul through page after page, detailing the self-loathing of a man hooked on competing, but for whom life outside the game becomes a nightmare. Unable to cope with the boredom of days off, unable to face the real self which lay behind the public persona, and unable to find a way to live a stable, reasonable life when not on a pitch, Adams' descent into a shameless, alcohol-infused hell is spelt out in the starkest detail. It is gripping stuff, in the way that watching an accident happen before your eyes is gripping. You can't tear yourself away from the story, which unfolds quickly before your eyes.
Yet thankfully this is also a happy end book, in which the seeds of Adams' new life are sown and begin to grow. Talking through his experiences and sharing them with other alcoholics, Adams grows from the ugly, angry, competitive caterpillar into a cultured butterfly – university student, crtic; it's as if his life has opened up, from one facet to many.
This book can surely give hope to all those whose opinion of themselves is far too harsh and critical; it shows that we are never too young to learn, to turn away from the "dark" towards the light of human achievement, and that life is not about pursuing one or two obsessions to the detriment of everything else.
Adams has paid a heavy price for his addiction, losing a marriage and losing the memories of some fantastic sporting achievements along the way, but in this well-written book it is clear that he is far from finished. I predict him to manage Arsenal to a string of titles when Arsène hangs up his clipboard!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By zissou on 12 Jan. 2007
Format: Paperback
'Addicted' is a thoroughly enjoyable read, Tony Adams delivers one of the most engaging and brutally honest autobiographies in print. In many autobiographies, particularly those of footballers, the subjects are often at pains to portray themselves in a good light, skirt over indefendable controversies and pass the blame for their failings, this is not the case with 'Addicted'. Charting his descent into alcoholism, detailing his beliefs and thought processes of the time, with somewhat staggering honesty. The book really allows the reader a sense of the man, then in his darkest days, and also of the recovering athlete re-enagaing with his first love. Some readers may feel there to be too much space and detail afforded to match descriptions and routine footballing information, however this serves to highlight the incredible acheivements and longevity of his career whilst all the while abusing his body to extreme levels. 'Addicted' is essential reading for football fans, and in fact anyone as it encourages self evaluation through its brutal honesty whilst charting the career of one of Englands finest defenders, which also consequently renders the subject, former England captain Tony Adams both intriguing and endearing.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "bevbishop44" on 5 Jan. 2006
Format: Paperback
I believe this book led the way for autobiographies to be more open and honest about the writer themselves and Tony Adams certainly achieved that with his honest admission of being an alcholic made compelling reading
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 Jan. 2003
Format: Paperback
If you're an Arsenal fan this is suberb as it details so many important games for Adams, which are also mostly important games for Arsenal. The detail he goes into is good if you need to brush up on your trivia of an Arsenal legend. But this books strongest point is the blunt honesty of a recovering alcoholic who battles bigger problems then marking the likes of Alan Shearer and Eric Cantona. This book is very moving for anyone who isnt even a football fan as it is about a human being getting over everyday problems, the only difference is he is famous which only made it harder to admit and overcome as he was the leader of one of Europes biggest football clubs. A good player and a better person for what he went through, frank and honest from start to end, hard to put down once you start reading.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bill HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on 9 Sept. 2014
Format: Paperback
I'm a life long Arsenal supporter and I was always a fan of Tony Adams, particularly his strong work ethic and dominating presence on the football pitch, which these days seems to be mirrored by very few defenders, obviously John Terry springs to mind, and possibly Vincent Kompany. This is very much a heart on the sleeve book, Tony is brutally honest about his long term battle with alcohol, and how he would look for any excuse to sink a few pints, whether it be to celebrate something, forget something, moan about something, and so on. He does not sugarcoat his personality, and he is not boastful about his impressive professional achievements, unlike some footballers who have issued autobiographies. I read Dennis Bergkamp's autobiography quite recently, which makes quite a contrast with Tony's story. The Bergkamp book is very analytical about coaching techniques and tactics, and discusses backroom football politics, whilst Tony's tale is far more down to earth, talking about his drink fuelled escapades with the likes of Steve Bould and Paul Merson. A good read but quite sad really, it certainly makes you think about your own attitude to booze. Whenever Gazza makes one of his sad sudden re-appearances in the media, having fallen off the wagon again, I do think back to this book, and I wonder how many modern footballers still go out on the p*** on a Friday night before match-day.
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