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Adam Bede (Oxford World's Classics) [Kindle Edition]

George Eliot , Carol A. Martin
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £8.99
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Book Description

Our deeds carry their terrible consequences...consequences that are hardly ever confined to ourselves.'

Pretty Hetty Sorrel is loved by the village carpenter Adam Bede, but her head is turned by the attentions of the fickle young squire, Arthur Donnithorne. His dalliance with the dairymaid has unforeseen consequences that affect the lives of many in their small rural community. First published in 1859, Adam Bede carried its readers back sixty years to the lush countryside of Eliot's native Warwickshire, and a time of impending change for England and the wider world. Eliot's powerful
portrayal of the interaction of ordinary people brought a new social realism to the novel, in which humour and tragedy co-exist, and fellow-feeling is the mainstay of human relationships. Faith, in the figure of Methodist preacher Dinah Morris, offers redemption to all who are willing to embrace it.

This new edition is based on the definitive Clarendon edition and Eliot's corrected text of 1861.

ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

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Product Description


this was a wonderful novel, layered and beautiful and complex. The fact that I wanted there to be even more of it is a testimony to how good it was. (Jenny Brown, Shelf Love)

About the Author

Carol A. Martin is Professor of English at Boise State University.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1025 KB
  • Print Length: 589 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; 1 edition (29 Mar. 2001)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #296,863 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Mary Ann (Marian) Evans was born in 1819 in Warwickshire. She attended schools in Nuneaton and Coventry, coming under the influence of evangelical teachers and clergymen. In 1836 her mother died and Marian became her father's housekeeper, educating herself in her spare time. In 1841 she moved to Coventry, and met Charles and Caroline Bray, local progressive intellectuals. Through them she was commissioned to translate Strauss's Life of Jesus and met the radical publisher John Chapman, who, when he purchased the Westminster Review in 1851, made her his managing editor.

Having lost her Christian faith and thereby alienated her family, she moved to London and met Herbert Spencer (whom she nearly married, only he found her too 'morbidly intellectual') and the versatile man-of-letters George Henry Lewes. Lewes was separated from his wife, but with no possibility of divorce. In 1854 he and Marian decided to live together, and did so until Lewes's death in 1878. It was he who encouraged her to turn from philosophy and journalism to fiction, and during those years, under the name of George Eliot, she wrote Scenes of Clerical Life, Adam Bede, The Mill on the Floss, Silas Marner, Romola, Felix Holt, Middlemarch and Daniel Deronda, as well as numerous essays, articles and reviews.

George Eliot died in 1880, only a few months after marrying J. W. Cross, an old friend and admirer, who became her first biographer. She was buried beside Lewes at Highgate. George Eliot combined a formidable intelligence with imaginative sympathy and acute powers of observation, and became one of the greatest and most influential of English novelists. Her choice of material widened the horizons of the novel and her psychological insights radically influenced the novelist's approach to characterization. Middlemarch, considered by most to be her masterpiece, was said by Virginia Woolf to be 'one of the few English novels written for grown-up people'.

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Customer Reviews

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4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the greats 30 Jan. 2012
One of my all-time favourites - the classic nineteenth-century realist novel with the chapter setting out so beautifully what the realist novel is about, which might make it seem dry and theoretical, but it is not at all. A moving and absorbing story for any reader, which deals with issues still relevant today. I don't want to say more about the plot and spoil it for those who are unfamiliar with it, but this is a novel which manages to deal with tragic events without depressing the reader, although unlike many Victorian novels does not resort to a sentimental happy ending. Well worth reading if you haven't read it before and easier to read than Middlemarch (Oxford World's Classics) if you are new to George Eliot. If you enjoy nineteenth-century novels you are sure to enjoy this. The Oxford World's Classics editions are my favourites, and not just for the pretty covers - the thorough introductions and chronologies really do help set the text in context. If you are an impoverished student, try to find a secondhand World's Classics edition, rather than buying a brand new cheap Wordsworth which tend not to have the critical apparatus - the extras often give you a few clues for essays and seminar papers!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A very human writer 27 May 2014
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
There could not be a more thoughtful writer than George Eliot, she considered everything of what it means to be human and wove it into her novels. Adam Bede is perhaps not as sophisticated in style as Daniel Deronda, but is still a wonderful read. George takes us on a slow journey through her pastoral landscape and what she says of life in the 19th century, you find is often just as relevant to us now.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Eliot's Thomas Hardy novel 28 Dec. 2009
By Roman Clodia TOP 100 REVIEWER
If you've read Middlemarch and/or Daniel Deronda, this is a very different George Eliot. More akin to The Mill on the Floss, it tells a story of rural tragedy which might have influenced Hardy, particularly in Tess.

Taking in Eliot's concerns about class, gender and education, this is a moving book that both depicts a lost world and yet involves subjects which still concern us today: a girl's choice between the exciting and staid lover, and the consequences of unthinking sex.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Adam Bede 15 Aug. 2015
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Fascinating story
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 3 Sept. 2014
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
No problems
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