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Adès: Powder Her Face

University of North Florida Jazz Ensemble I, Jill Gomez Audio CD
2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: £17.92
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Product details

  • Performer: Jill Gomez, Valdine Anderson, Niall Morris, Roger Bryson
  • Composer: Thomas Adès
  • Audio CD (1 Oct 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: EMI
  • ASIN: B00000DFNX
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 277,897 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I: Overture (Orchestra)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 2:58£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 1: Nineteen ninety: Oo, aa! ha ha ha ha ha (Maid/Electrician)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 4:12£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 1: Nineteen ninety: I see. This is what it has come toThomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 2:51£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 1: Nineteen ninety: Take it from me (Duchess/Electrician/Maid)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 5:06£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 1: Nineteen ninety: Interlude (Orchestra)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 1:06£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 2: Nineteen thirty-four: Of course she's done wellThomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 2:14£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 2: Nineteen thirty-four: I could never grow bored of dukedoms (Confidante/Lounge Lizard/Duchess)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 1:52£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 2: Nineteen thirty-four: I hear him coming (Pantomime) (Duchess/Confidante/Lounge Lizard/Duke)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 5:07£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 2: Nineteen thirty-four: Interlude (Orchestra)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 2:37£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 3: Nineteen thirty-six: Fancy, fancy being rich (Waitress)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 4:45£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 3: Nineteen thirty-six: Interlude - Scene 4: Nineteen fifty-three ...mm...ah!...How may I help you? (Duchess/Laundryman/Other Guest)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 3:49£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 3: Nineteen thirty-six: ...mm..ah!...Room service?Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 3:23£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 3: Nineteen thirty-six: What have you got there?Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 3:08£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 3: Nineteen thirty-six: Come here (Duchess/Waiter)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 6:18£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen15. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 3: Nineteen thirty-six: Interlude (Orchestra)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 2:04£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen16. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 5: Nineteen fifty-three: Is Daddy squiffy?Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 5:43£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen17. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 5: Nineteen fifty-three: Are you saying the Duchess is a whore?Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 4:57£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen18. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, ACT I, Scene 5: Nineteen fifty-three: Ha ha ha ha...(Paper chase) (Mistress/Duke)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 2:18£0.99  Buy MP3 


Disc 2:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, Act II, Scene 6: Nineteen fifty-five: Did she?...Of course she did (Rubberneckers)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 3:09£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, Act II, Scene 6: Nineteen fifty-five: Order. SilenceThomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 5:29£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, Act II, Scene 6: Nineteen fifty-five: But now I have heard something new (Judge)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 3:45£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, Act II, Scene 6: Nineteen fifty-five: Did you hear - What he said? (Rubberneckers)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 1:44£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, Act II, Scene 6: Nineteen fifty-five: So that is all (Duchess/Rubberneckers)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 5:09£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, Act II, Scene 6: Nineteen fifty-five: Interlude (Orchestra)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 1:04£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, Act II, Scene 7: Nineteen seventy: I'd like to make one thing entirely clearThomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 3:06£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, Act II, Scene 7: Nineteen seventy: Ah! None left (Duchess/Society Journalist/Delivery Boy)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 4:11£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, Act II, Scene 7: Nineteen seventy: Interlude Fifty-eight, seventy-nine (Duchess)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 1:16£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, Act II, Scene 8: Nineteen ninety: Agh - Who are you? (Duchess/Hotel Manager)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 6:34£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, Act II, Scene 8: Nineteen ninety: That will do. You may go (Duchess)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 4:44£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, Act II, Scene 8: Nineteen ninety: Broken. It's broken (Duchess/Hotel Manager)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 8:07£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Powder Her Face (an Opera in two acts) Op.14, Act II, Ghost Epilogue: Enough...Or too much! (Maid/Electrician)Thomas Adès/Jill Gomez/Almeida Ensemble/Valdine Anderson/Niall Morris/Roger Bryson 2:41£0.99  Buy MP3 


Product Description

Amazon.co.uk

Simply put, Thomas Adès's chamber opera Powder Her Face will likely be one of the strongest, most compelling pieces of contemporary music you've heard in a long while. The libretto, at once tragic and savagely funny, is by the acclaimed young English novelist Philip Hensher and addresses a resonantly scandalous topic: the glamour-drenched life and downfall of Margaret, Duchess of Argyll, whose divorce trial in the 1950s set benchmark lows for publicising someone's sex life. Adès's score is a bona fide masterpiece, combining a broad palette of styles and influences, from tango and Cole Porter to Berg's Lulu and mordant atonality, all scored with brilliant invention for an ensemble of 15 musicians (here conducted by the composer). But Adès, born in 1971, succeeds where others have tumbled: he's a true man of the theatre, and there's no pastiche in the music, which rises above the level of collage (except for one purposely inserted camp tune) and instead coheres into a seamless, thrusting, witty, highly dramatic whole. The four-member cast, led by Jill Gomez as the Duchess, is right on target. Valdine Anderson portrays a series of mocking antagonists (given high-wire acrobatic vocalisms) who precipitate the downfall, while Niall Morris and Roger Bryson bring engaging variety to their multiple roles as the male figures in the Duchess's world. An event not to be missed. --Pierre Ruhe

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
2.8 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD
Here Thomas Adès has presented us with a masterpiece. This opera is a cruelly human piece about the sexual exploits and proceeding trial of the Duchess of Argyll.

The composer and librettist (Philip Hensher) have created an incredibly moving work that explores the Duchess' unquenchable thirst for sex; the pitiless mockery of the various staff at the Hotel she's staying in; the unforgiving sentence of the Judge; the shameless hypocrisy of the jealous, condemning Duke; the overwhelming humiliation the Duchess suffers when she is finally asked to leave and tries to hold onto the last scraps of dignity she has.

The wonderful score Adès has written for this piece of incredible drama works perfectly. His compositional voice is fantastically versatile - combining Weill and Berg and his own extraordinarily original style.

This is a soberingly, profoundly, brutally beautiful work written by the most inspired and intelligent composer of the last 30 years.
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9 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Real Music 21 Dec 2001
Format:Audio CD
With new music it is difficult to be sure: only repeat hearings will confirm early impressions. But my initial impression is that this is music worth getting to know better. I look forward to the time when I can say that I am familiar with this music. It is really interesting.
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13 of 27 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Long-winded and cruel 16 Dec 2000
Format:Audio CD
POWDER HER FACE has received a succes de scandale for many things, notably the infamous fellatio scene. That is perhaps the only bright moment in a protracted chamber opera that pares away any of the inherent humanity and dignity of the characters. The libretto is extremely wordy (a fault of many operas written today), and Ades' text-setting falls short of inspired or cogent. I found the piece awfully long and insincere - much of the opera's sound depends upon a sense of parody and mockery rather than actual meaningful human communication.
While all the performers rise to Ades' virtuoso demands, the writing doesn't seem to offer many rewards once one passes all the athletic hurdles. Ades seems to be reliant upon juxtaposition throughout the piece, placing a tango here and a pop song there while only intermittently revealing his own harsh compositional voice. That voice revels in being "off-the-wall" - which may entertain briefly, but in the end, what remains but a bitter taste? To these ears, he's only copying what Peter Maxwell Davies did years ago (only better). Save your money - POWDER HER FACE isn't a major addition to modern opera.
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11 of 26 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Harsh and unimaginative music 14 Aug 2003
Format:Audio CD
When I saw this opera at my local record shop at half price, I lept at it. After all wasn't Thomas Adés the future of British classical music, the new Benjamin Britten? And wasn't this the opera with the famous oral sex scene?
I was so disappointed when I listened to this drivel. I wish I'd have spent my money on something more worthwhile, you know like cigarettes or hamburgers. I'm not necessarily averse to the charms of atonality, but this was so unimaginative and dull. Most of the musical techniques used in it were being used by people like Krenek and Berg in the '20s, only they were being used a lot better then. Adés seems to think that driving voices and instruments to the extreme limits of their ranges is the way to create excitement. Instead it sounds shrill and harsh - and utterly unremitting, with, to my ears, no change in mood in any part of the opera.
This is not to dis the players, who respond to the extreme demands placed upon them admirably. My worry is that people hear things like this and abandon the idea of contemporary music altogether. For some quality modern opera, save the money you would spend on this and listen Glass, Adams, Judith Weir or Rautavaara instead.
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Amazon.com: 2.8 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Opera of the future? Hmm... I don't think so 11 Jan 2000
By Simon - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I think it's perfectly possible to have an viewpoint lyingsomewhere in between. I bought it on the basis of a wildlyenthusiastic review in Music Magazine, which mentioned the work in the same breath as the great operas of Berg, Britten et al. Aside from that there was the instrinsic fascination of hearing a work written by a guy who went to the same school as myself, and who was always getting heaps of praise from his school-mates about how brilliant he was (though as a pianist rather than a composer). However, as so often in the case of a promising young `star', I believe this opera has received in many musical quarters the kind of excessive critical appraisal that does neither the work nor the composer any favours. Comparing the work to Wozzeck and the great operas of Britten is hyberbole driven to excess. There are certainly passages of genuine dramatic intensity, but these are rarely sustained and nothing comparable to the horror experienced in Wozzeck; and Ades has yet to acquire Britten's succinct characterisation and direct emotional appeal that makes his operas such great works. To begin with: the libretto. Others may disagree, but in using a semi-biographical story based on the sordid sex life of a beautiful but ultimately tragic aristocrat, Ades encountered from the start an uphill struggle. Surely no one will make the mistake in the future of attempting to write an opera based on Princess Di's failed marriage and untimely death! This inevitably results in a problem piece; a piece too sophisticated and eseoteric in idiom to appeal to the masses in spite of its soap-opera-like plot, but too banal and shallow in places (such as the Noel Coward pastiche) for it to be a great and convincing work of art. The elements of the popular and avant-garde do not for me coalesce. Ades is undeniably gifted when it comes to devising novel instrumental effects within an unconventional ensemble, what with its most unusual percussion section (including a fishing reel among other things!); but too often this results in superficiality; there is much surface gloss but not enough depth of emotion. There are exceptions, notably the closing scene with the Duchess lamenting her declining reputation, but these come like oasises in a desert. There is a host of allusions, sometimes clever disguised, to a variety of popular styles, such as jazz, cabaret and Broadway but these have little relevance to the more seriously intentioned parts of the work. Moreover, I don't feel that Ades sufficiently disguises the element of pastiche often prevalent in the work. Kurt Weill, and even Britten to some extent had no hesitation in employing popular idioms in their work, but these always came with an underlying cynicism and bitterness (as in Mahler). The opera improves in the second half, when the Duchess's declining fortunes begin to catch up with her, and the music is shed of most of its previous pastiche. However there remain other problems; there is too much dialogue, and this is largely the fault of the libretto, I'm afraid. Based on real life events, rather than ancient mythology or Shakespearean dramas (as in the Wagner or Verdi operas), the opera's characters 'talk' too much, rather than make any really meaningful statements, and this poses real problems when setting their dialogue to music. There is too much recitative, and when there is melodic writing for the singers, it too often submerges what's going on in the small orchestra, making listening very heavy going without the aid of the plot. I should be able to enjoy the opera as absolute music, without constant recourse to the libretto in the CD sleeve notes, but I find it very difficult at times! It was only when I saw a Channel 4 production last Christmas that some of the complexities of the work and the relevance between music and words came to light, but this TV staging still failed to convince me that the work is a great masterpiece. Precocious as Ades certainly was (only 24!) when he wrote Powder her Face, he would have to be a genius even greater than Mozart, Mendelssohn or Britten to have created an example of the difficult genre opera that stands comparison with some of the greatest works ever written. Berg and Britten, for instance, were both well over 30 and truly experienced composers when they wrote their great operatic masterpieces. Powder her Face is undeniably the work of a greatly talented and still developing composer, but one whose talents I feel would be better directed in the spheres of orchestral and chamber music. Surely history will regard Asyla as a far more successful work than the much more hyped Powder her Face- and one which makes its point convincingly in a sixth of the time in which Powder her Face, I'm afraid, doesn't.
10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not Bowled Over by This 23 Sep 2003
By Christopher Forbes - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
When hot new composers are discussed in learned critical circles, one name that frequently appears is Thomas Ades. Ades is a young British composer and pianist who has made quite a stir with his brilliantly orchestrated, eclectic compositions, which feature elements from popular music, but filtered through a strongly modernist prism. Ades has created an impressive resume, with major commissions for full-scale work from around the globe, and has gained such champions as Sir Simon Rattle, who will be performing Ades' orchestral work, Asyla, in his New York debut with the Berlin Philharmonic. Not bad for a young composer only just barely thirty.
Naturally, when a young talent such as this writes an opera, it is considered a major event. Unfortunately, despite the critical praise that Ades has received from some quarters, particularly from noted critic Paul Griffiths, I can't find much to celebrate in Power Her Face. Despite the witty orchestral writing, and some attractive use of tango material, to me, Powder Her Face is mostly devoid of dramatic and musical interest.
The plot of the opera was derived from the life of the Duchess of Argyll, who led a scandalous sexual life, which is depicted rather graphically in the opera, before her downfall in a public trial and ultimately her disgraceful end. Outside of the shock value, I'm not sure what exactly attracted Ades and librettist Phillip Hensher to this subject. The characters in the opera are mere ciphers, not fully realized human beings. If they were going for the alienation techniques of Brecht, they missed one key element in Brecht's aesthetic, the fact that no matter how horrible the characters in a Brecht play, there is a fully drawn human being underneath, one that you end up having sympathy with despite yourself. In Powder Her Face, this dimension of humanity is almost completely absent. The only time the Duchess is anything but a caricature is in her final aria, which is just too little, too late for me. And ultimately, there is no point to the opera besides prurience. When Brecht put his lecherous or greedy characters on stage, there was an underlying social point being made. If there is a social point to Powder Her Face is it a pretty flimsy one, and one that has been made with more wit and style by more talented creators.
Musically, Ades does show promise. The instrumentation is, as usual for the composer, quite innovative. Powder Her Face is called a "cabaret opera" a genre which Ades does get credit for inventing, though it's roots are in the Brecht/Weill collaborations of Three Penny Opera and Happy End. Ades is fascinated by the popular music of the time, and in between highly modernist phrases you hear snatches of Noel Coward-like melodies or tango tunes. The writing for voices is more problematic. Ades is not a bad setter of words. The language can always be heard, even without recourse to the libretto. That's a sure test of skill in prosody. However, except for some set pieces in popular style, and the Duchess' last aria, the work is devoid of anything memorable. Opera need not be glowing with melody. Debussy proved that 100 years ago with Pelleas. But it needs something musical to draw the ear in, and Powder Her Face just doesn't have this. All in all, it gives the impression that it would have been much better as a play with some background music. Nothing in the work sounds as if it was compelled to be sung.
Lest it be though that I am not a fan of Ades, I am. I like Asyla and some of the other instrumental pieces a lot. Though I don't think he is quite at the level that his supporters claim, I do think that, if he ignores some of the hype that has been attached to him, he will grow into a composer of real stature. But my sincere hope is that, when he tries another opera, and he should, that he examine more carefully the choice of subject, and try to go for something that really makes a statement. Shock value wears rather thin after a while.
22 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Future Of Modern Opera 12 Nov 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
No opera about a sex-crazed English duchess could be all bad, right? "Powder Her Face" lives up to its rave UK reviews, and then some. Ades has an amazing knack of writing accessible music that is also totally modern. At times strongly reminiscent of Britten, at other times a pastiche of composers like Bartok or Stravinsky, his orchestration is powerful and innovative. To non-opera buffs, or those of a more lowbrow persuasion, the thought will occur: "this is what Frank Zappa could have achieved, if he'd tried a bit harder." The Five Star rating is no exaggeration. Watch for the great sloppy thirties-style ballads, Jill Gomez' excellent singing, and the sly way Ades nods a tribute to pretty much every musical form of the 20th century, while retaining proper operatic forms. Buy it!
16 of 24 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Grating and noisy. 26 Dec 1999
By John J. Coyne - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Of course an opera about a sex-crazed duchess can be bad. But young Thomas Ades' first opera, Powder her Face, is not bad - it's accostic and unlistenable. Speaking as one of the unfortunate contemporary music fans present for the US premiere of this opera, I know for a fact that I do not stand alone when I say that Ades' attempt to set the English language to music, and to sustain a two-act, essentially banal story line fall so far short of all the hype surrounding the performance that one wonders who the composer had to bribe to get his music played in the first place. Not only is his choice of idiom (a transparent and ultimately unsuccessful fusion of popular music and austere modernism) totally unsuited to the words being sung, but the composer's apparent inexperience in orchestration resulted in entire passages where one could not hear the vocal line at all under the dense instrumental writing. Not that you would be able to understand what was being sung even if it weren't. This is a far cry from the future of modern opera, and if some composer years from now finds any of the music written in the latter half of the twentieth century to be influential, I can assure you that Powder Her Face will not part of it. If you're looking for good contemporary opera, I would suggest Harrison Birtwislte's Punch and Judy, Meredith Monk's ATLAS, John Adam's Death of Klinghoffer, or David Amram's The Final Ingredient.
6 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A New Direction 1 Jan 2001
By Nat - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
It's typical of the classical music establishment that there are so many vitriolic reviews on this page. Ades' use of pastiche and reference does not belittle his unique musical approach. Give him a chance - he was only 24 when he wrote this intruiguing and compelling work, and I have no doubt that his compositional style will mature into something very special. And no, I am not his mother!... ps. the "Fancy Being Rich!" "aria" is a joy to sing - he really understands the capabilities of the voice (something many modern composers - namely Tavener - cannot grasp!...)
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