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Absent [DVD]


Price: £6.75 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
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Absent [DVD] + Plan B [DVD]
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Product details

  • Actors: Carlos Echeverria, Javier de Pietro, Antonella Costa
  • Directors: Marco Berger
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: Spanish
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Network Releasing
  • DVD Release Date: 9 April 2012
  • Run Time: 87 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B006VIHEQI
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 57,479 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

ABSENT by Marco Berger is all about the relationship between Martin, a 16 year old student, and Sebastian, his professor. But this is not the story of a teacher seducing a pupil but of a boy falling for a man.

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Tommy Dooley TOP 100 REVIEWER on 5 May 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is an Argentinean film from director Marco Berger who brought us `Plan B'. It tells the story of Martin (Javier De Pietro) a swarthy, sixteen year old schoolboy, who has a crush on his teacher, which I am led to believe is a pretty common event. Martins' teacher though is Sebastian (Carlos Echivarria) and he is the sports teacher. One day at swim class Martin feigns an eye injury and the Proffessore has to take him to the eye doctor. Martin though has unhatched a cunning plan that sees him getting to stay the night with his teacher and closer to the object of his desires.

Martin just keeps pushing the boundaries all the time but in a kind of innocent way and his teacher just isn't sure what is going on. The following day he starts to realise that Martin is not so innocent and this leads to further complications and gets the emotions of both of them all mixed up.

This film is like waiting for a bomb to explode, it is dripping with a brooding quality of lasciviousness that keeps you hooked. There are no bad performances and the development of the characters is both believable and engaging. The musical score is excellent too with just the right amount of mood to compliment the film rather than trying to be a barometer for your emotions.

This is a story of the follies of young adult lust and not about the bedroom gymnastics, so if you are looking for something that you want to `interact' with, this is definitely not for you. It is a slow burner and it won't be to everybody's taste, the ending is also fairly ambiguous, so please be warned, but it had me gripped throughout. In Spanish with good subs this is one for World cinema fans and those who like gay themed films.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Clare on 13 May 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Director Marco Berger has accomplished a great deal in film, and his Plan B [DVD] in particular has received many a deserving accolade. It was largely for this reason that I was eager to see "Absent". The premise is somewhat unusual in that the young protagonist Martin, exploring his own sexuality seeks to seduce his older teacher Sebastian, as opposed to exploring such amongst his peers. What transpires is an elaborate, albeit deceptive plan, to spend the night with his teacher in the hope that "something happens between them". Indeed a great deal happens, although not in the way the audience expects. The young teacher, who is as reserved as Martin, seems acutely aware of the dangers involved in this interaction. Despite avoiding such, and making alternative arrangements he agrees to allow young Martin to stay in his home. As a comfort he tells his girlfriend what is happening, not to obtain her approval but rather as a means of addressing his own fears. What unfolds over the course of a week, following that night over, is both surprising and intoxicating to watch.

The irony being that both characters are equally inhibited in their respective truths, and both seem incapable of addressing such head on. Martin is a little more concerning, in that he has a impulsive and destructive streak, which is unfortunately directed against his infatuation. Not that his teacher is innocent, in that his own underlying desires and unspoken truths, make for an aggressive reaction.

Whilst the story itself is titivating, I found many aspects of the film to be stretched and implausible.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By schumann_bg TOP 50 REVIEWER on 25 Jun. 2014
Format: DVD
Absent is an intriguing film from the director of Plan B, Marco Berger, and is brought off with rather more conviction than that film. 16-year-old Martin tricks his swimming teacher into letting him stay at his flat overnight in the hope that something sexual will happen, and the whole ambiguity of emotion arises out of this question of what both characters really feel. The main note of the film is a thriller-like not knowing which way it will go next, and Berger controls the plotline admirably. I would have welcomed more clearcut feeling, less suspension, but then it would have been a different kind of film. As it is, it could already be seen as quite provocative, and the screenplay subtly plays on the taboos that come into the setup very quickly in this kind of situation. The film has a kind of coolness, but holds the interest. A lot of it is shot in close-up. The two leads are both excellent, although Martin was too old for the part, really. Given what the film required him to do, and the frame of mind it put him in, I imagine it wouldn't have been possible to use someone of the right age, as he not so subtly flaunts himself in just his underwear both in front of the teacher and a friend of his own age, both times lying in bed, which may give a clue as to his real feelings. He did have the mannerisms of someone quite young, as did his friend, which was interesting to see acted this way because they did not seem ridiculous. However they weren't quite convincing either, and where we suspend disbelief happily enough in an opera, in a film it is harder. Maybe it should go in the opposite direction to Blue Is The Warmest Colour and be rewritten as a comic, where it could be more accurately represented? It is a bold film, though, and quite original.
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