A Year in Provence and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£2.13
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

A Year in Provence Paperback – 15 Jul 2011


See all 32 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 15 Jul 2011
£0.01


Product details

  • Paperback: 207 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Books; 1st Vintage Ed edition (15 July 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780679731146
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679731146
  • ASIN: 0679731148
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 1.5 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (92 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,398,304 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Amazon Review

Who hasn't dreamed, on a mundane Monday or frustratingFriday, of chucking it all in and packing off to the south of France? Provençal cookbooks and guidebooks entice with provocatively fresh salads and azure skies, but is it really all Côtes-du-Rhône and fleur-de-lis? Author Peter Mayle answers that question with wit, warmth, and wicked candor in A Year in Provence, the chronicle of his own foray into Provençal domesticity.

Beginning, appropriately enough, on New Year's Day with a divine luncheon in a quaint restaurant, Mayle sets the scene and pits his British sensibilities against it. "We had talked about it during the long gray winters and the damp green summers," he writes, "looked with an addict's longing at photographs of village markets and vineyards, dreamed of being woken up by the sun slanting through the bedroom window." He describes in loving detail the charming, 200-year-old farmhouse at the base of the Lubéron Mountains, its thick stone walls and well-tended vines, its wine cave and wells, its shade trees and swimming pool--its lack of central heating. Indeed, not 10 pages into the book, reality comes crashing into conflict with the idyll when the Mistral, that frigid wind that ravages the Rhône valley in winter, cracks the pipes, rips tiles from the roof, and tears a window from its hinges. And that's just January.

In prose that skips along lightly, Mayle records the highlights of each month, from the aberration of snow in February and the algae-filled swimming pool of March through the tourist invasions and unpredictable renovations of the summer months to a quiet Christmas alone. Throughout the book, he paints colorful portraits of his neighbors, the Provençaux grocers and butchers and farmers who amuse, confuse, and befuddle him at every turn. A Year in Provence is part memoir, part homeowner's manual, part travelogue, and all charming fun. --L.A. Smith --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Peter Mayle's work has been translated into twenty two languages. His previous books include A Year in Provence, Toujours Provence and his recent novels Anything Considered and Chasing Cezanne, available from Penguin. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
THE YEAR BEGAN with lunch. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Julie on 15 Jun. 2003
Format: Paperback
A Year in Provence ... Peter Mayle is a master of wit in this book. He seems to effortlessly bring his characters to life with their amusing quirks and behaviours. It is a very witty account of the problems Mayle encountered trying to get settled in the new country - trying to adapt and be accepted. This really is one of my laugh out loud books, and I would recommend it as such. Most countries/cultures have a few funny little quirky behaviours, that can be considered amusing if you can step back and see the funny side of life. If you can approach this book with that view in mind, and light-heartedly enjoy the diversity of cultures and their customs/ behaviours, you will indeed enjoy and appreciate this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jacques Tati on 30 Jun. 2010
Format: Paperback
This love -letter to Provence, written in the late eighties, is still very readable. You can practically feel the sun on your back, and believe you are tasting with Peter Mayle the glorious range of food and wine across the seasons.

A Year In Provence spent a long time, deservedly, at the top of the best- seller list when it was first published. It also had many imitators, but none came anywhere near to equalling it.

The book has shrunk to only 4 stars now in my estimation because it has dated a little, through no fault of the author's. Technology has galloped ahead since the book was written, making the book a pre-internet period piece.

Nevertheless, if you are heading for the South of France, read this to put you in the mood.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By phunt@antennaaudio.net on 28 Mar. 2002
Format: Paperback
This is not a high-brow expose of French culture, but rather a pleasent account of a man and his wife doing what I wish I could, moving permanently to a quiet French village.
It's obvious that Peter Mayle is not short of a few pounds as he seems able to afford all rennovations to his house (any-one wishing to read an account of pennyless people moving to a foreign country should read 'Extra Virgin' by Annie Hawes) but this is not a DIY book either.
Peter Mayle has an effortless way to make his writing feel like a long letter to a friend.
You will not discover any ground breaking revelations here but, as one who spends time with an adopted continental family, I recognised many of the quirks which Peter Mayle describes (and my continental partner did not find it in the least offensive either). If you dont have a funny bone, dont read this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By John P. Jones III TOP 500 REVIEWER on 5 Oct. 2012
Format: Hardcover
whatever useless things that these hands have done." The previous quote is a line from a Leonard Cohen song, with the eponymous subject title. He's still, or more properly, back on the concert circuit, and was recently in Toulon, which, with a bit of longitude, could be considered far eastern Provence. Peter Mayle felt a similar longing, and in the beginning of his book, he described it thus: "We had talked about it during the long grey winters and damp green summers, looked with an addict's longing at photographs of village markets and vineyards..." Provence is hardly a secret; it is a destination of choice for the "au courant," starting with at least Caesar's troops, who might be granted a farm there for their retirement if they lived that long. Do you hear that, Veterans Administration?

Mayle, who is English, wrote this charming account of a year there in 1989. It has become a classic of sorts, with millions of copies now in print. Supposedly, the Japanese tour buses would weave through the narrow streets of Ménerbes so they could take a picture of his now renovated house. Mayle had been an advertising executive, managed to accumulate a few coins, "saw the light," chucked it all, and actually fulfilled his dream, and that of his wife, and perhaps the dog's also. Provence was no longer just a vacation destination; it became his home when he purchased one in the countryside, along the northern base of the Luberon massif. It is a year's account, commencing in January, with a chapter devoted to each month. The hardback version which I acquired shortly after it was originally published is warmly illustrated, with black and white sketches, by Leslie Forbes.

The "tongue" is reflected in perhaps 30% of the book; a loving description of the food, and the many meals prepared.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By David D. Madden on 20 May 2002
Format: Paperback
I could not put it down it was very funny and has introduced me to his other books. Despite what some other reviews might say it is not a poke at the French people. It is very obvious that Mayle is in love with the people and the country.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Molly reads on 8 Aug. 2009
Format: Paperback
This book was first published in 1989 and I've been late getting to it. I read it this summer in the south of France. I was staying in a very quiet rural village - perhaps what the towns in Provence were at the time of Peter Mayle's writing. The book is set out in 12 chapters , one per month. So it covers the full seasons - from cold winter snows, to the mistral winds and the glorious summers. There are some good laughs in the book - particularly renovating the house. I enjoyed his descriptions of the food and his trips to various vineyards to purchase wine.
As a female reader , I would have like to have gotten to know his wife a little better - although mentioned throughout the book I didn't feel I got to know her well.
Overall, hugely enjoyable.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback